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Ethiopia

Articles by Ethiopia

Malawi_IPPF_Tommy Trenchard
31 January 2022

Feminist Opportunities Now (FON)

  The objective of the project is to build the capacity of women's movements, via sub-grants and organizational development support, especially for small organizations, often non-registered, to address and respond to gender-based violence. Budget:  14,000 000 EUR Donor: Agence Française de Développement (AFD) Timeline: 4 years (Start date – Q2 of 2022) Project implementation areas: Mexico and Columbia in Latin-America (led by MdM), Bangladesh and Sri Lanka in Asia (led by CREA) and Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Guinea the Ivory Cost, Kenya and Mali (led by IPPFARO Partners: IPPF ARO, Médecins du Monde(MdM), Creating Resources for Empowerment in Action (CREA), FIDH (International Federation on Human Rights) & Empow’Her. Other interesting information: It is the first time IPPF has received direct funding from AFD, the first time we are partnering with these new consortium partners and delivering on a large global project

A woman receiving an antenatal check up in West Ambae, Vanuatu
31 March 2017

SPRINT: Sexual and reproductive health in crisis and post-crisis situations

The SPRINT Initiative provides one of the most important aspects of humanitarian assistance that is often forgotten when disaster and conflicts strike: access to essential life-saving sexual and reproductive health services. We build capacity of humanitarian workers to deliver essential life-saving sexual and reproductive health services in crisis and post-crisis situations through the delivery of the Minimum Initial Service Package (SRH) for reproductive health in emergencies.   Through funding from the Australian Government's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) our SPRINT Initiative has brought sexual and reproductive health to the humanitarian agenda, increased capacity and responded to a number of humanitarian emergencies. Australia has funded the SPRINT initiative since 2007 and has supported reaching 1,138,175 people to date and continues to respond to ongoing emergencies.   In each priority country, we work with an IPPF Member Association to coordinate and implement SPRINT activities. Through these partnerships, SPRINT helps strengthen the enabling environment, improve national capacity and provide lifesaving services during times of crisis.   You can read more about the SPRINT Initiative and IPPF Humanitarian’s Programme here.   Australian Government's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT)      Australia's location in the Indo-Pacific provides us with a unique perspective on humanitarian action. Australia is committed to helping partner governments manage crisis response themselves. This is done through building the capacity of the national government and civil society to be able to respond to disaster. DFAT also works with experienced international partners to prepare for and respond to disasters, including other donors, United Nations agencies, the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and non-government organisations.  

Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia

Ethiopia, the second most populous country in Africa, and the tenth most populous in the world, has enormous sexual and reproductive health (SRH) challenges as the statistics demonstrate.

The Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE) celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2015. It has a broad reach which focuses on providing poor and marginalized populations with family planning, safe abortion care, maternal and child health care, prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases (STIs) including HIV and AIDS and associated opportunistic infections.

In the shape of permanent clinics, mobile facilities, community-based services (CBSs), FGAE has numerous service points. Staff, backed by over thousands volunteers, hundreds of peer educators and of community-based distributors (CBDs). 

There’s no disguising the fact that achieving proper SRH amongst the Ethiopian people is an exhausting uphill struggle. FGAE has the will, the determination and the backing to fight for people’s rights and welfare.

Access is key to the Member Association’s activity, and it works extensively with young people to inform, educate and provide essential SRH services. FGAE also runs special projects targeted at particularly vulnerable individuals and groups: street children, people living with HIV and AIDS, sex workers, and young migrants in 8 of the 11 principal Regions in Ethiopia.

FGAE partners with government, with non-governmental organisations(NGOs) including the  Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Women, Children and Youth, UNFPA-Ethiopia, CARE-Ethiopia, DKT-Ethiopia, Dawn of Hope, the Ethiopian Women’s Lawyer Association, and a broad spectrum of HIV and AIDS-related operations.

Private sector partners include Betezata Hospital and Janmeda/medical bio laboratories, and donors to the Member Association’s work include the Royal Netherlands Embassy, the Packard Foundation, IPPF’s Japan Trust Fund, USAID/CDC and Irish Aid.

Website: www.fgaeet.org

 

Tewodros Kassa
24 September 2020

"My Experiences as a Health Journalist"- Tewodros Kassa (Ethiopia)

Tewodros Kassa is a 27-year-old journalist from Ethiopia, currently a reporter with the Ethiopian Herald. A holder of a BA degree in journalism and communications, Tewodros chose health journalism as his specialty. In this article, he shares his experiences as a health reporter, more so during this time of the COVID-19 pandemic. Tewodros is also a member of the IPPF Africa Region SRHR Journalists' Network.  Why did you choose to be a journalist? I chose journalism because I wanted to positively contribute to society by sharing information through telling powerful stories. I observed that many people faced difficulties in life due to lack of proper information, especially that related to their health. I wanted to fill this gap by empowering them with information that would enable them to make healthy decisions about their lives. Why did you choose to specialize in health journalism? I particularly chose health journalism because good health is critical to our survival and well-being. However, there remains a wide information gap when it comes to health. While there are so many important health issues to be covered, in Ethiopia, many media houses prioritize politics, business, and other agendas, with minimal space being given to health. My desire has always been to change this by advocating for more coverage of health issues and mobilizing policy makers and other stakeholders’ commitment towards a healthier society through well-told stories. Where do you get your stories from? I like reporting from a human-interest angle. This involves interviewing ordinary people in the field. Reporting this way helps my readers connect with the story better. Data and lengthy reports filled with jargon from scientists, researchers, medics and policymakers are best interpreted and told through the stories of individuals -the human-interest angle, and that is what I do. What is your daily routine like as a health journalist? Every morning, I make sure I catch up with global and local news as I keep myself updated. I then try to develop story ideas based on the health issues of the day. I also finish any pending stories I was working on. I am constantly in touch with my sources –who include health care professionals, patients, researchers and scientists as they are the ones who give me new information and help verify facts in their areas of expertise. Which is the most memorable story you have ever filed? It has to be the story I did titled “The covert life of Eskedar”. This was the story of a 35-year-old woman living in rural Ethiopia, and whose education was interrupted when she was married off at the tender age of 10. She went on to face abuse in her marriage, which she eventually left. In her struggle for survival, she ended up on the streets as a commercial sex worker, where she faced a myriad of challenges including sexual violence, harassment and exposure to sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV. Eskedar’s story inspired me to continue doing more reports that highlight issues of poverty, child marriage and the need for education of the girl child, as well as women’s empowerment.   What have some of your experiences been during COVID-19? My reporting experience during Covid-19 has no doubt been challenging. Staying at home and working from home is difficult as a journalist, especially when your work largely requires you to go out to the field to collect information. Restrictions on movement have affected our regular group discussion forums, attending of conferences and other public forums -all of which are platforms for harvesting good story ideas. However, conducting telephone interviews, use of social media and other digital technologies have allowed me to succeed in my reporting during the pandemic.  Social media has been of great benefit to me when reporting during COVID-19. I have attended many press conferences, webinars, conducted interviews and followed live proceedings of reports and briefings via social media. Besides, social media is faster than the mainstream media when it comes to disseminating stories to the public. I can also say that adhering to the stipulated COVID-19 safety mechanisms have helped me stay safe. I wear my face mask as required, washing hands properly, sanitize, stay home when it is necessary, and I observe social distancing while out there. How have you worked with IPPF’s Member Association during this time? Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE) has over the years played a supportive role for me as a journalist – something it has continued to do during this time of COVID-19. As I’m collecting information, FGAE always helps me find the right person for the interview, generate new ideas, access experts for my story, access data and other resources, among others. FGAE has helped me over the years in my health reporting. Tewodros spoke to Maryanne W. Waweru, Communications Officer, IPPF Africa Regional Office For more information about the work of IPPF Africa Region, connect with us on Facebook and Twitter. 

Malawi_IPPF_Tommy Trenchard
31 January 2022

Feminist Opportunities Now (FON)

  The objective of the project is to build the capacity of women's movements, via sub-grants and organizational development support, especially for small organizations, often non-registered, to address and respond to gender-based violence. Budget:  14,000 000 EUR Donor: Agence Française de Développement (AFD) Timeline: 4 years (Start date – Q2 of 2022) Project implementation areas: Mexico and Columbia in Latin-America (led by MdM), Bangladesh and Sri Lanka in Asia (led by CREA) and Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Guinea the Ivory Cost, Kenya and Mali (led by IPPFARO Partners: IPPF ARO, Médecins du Monde(MdM), Creating Resources for Empowerment in Action (CREA), FIDH (International Federation on Human Rights) & Empow’Her. Other interesting information: It is the first time IPPF has received direct funding from AFD, the first time we are partnering with these new consortium partners and delivering on a large global project

A woman receiving an antenatal check up in West Ambae, Vanuatu
31 March 2017

SPRINT: Sexual and reproductive health in crisis and post-crisis situations

The SPRINT Initiative provides one of the most important aspects of humanitarian assistance that is often forgotten when disaster and conflicts strike: access to essential life-saving sexual and reproductive health services. We build capacity of humanitarian workers to deliver essential life-saving sexual and reproductive health services in crisis and post-crisis situations through the delivery of the Minimum Initial Service Package (SRH) for reproductive health in emergencies.   Through funding from the Australian Government's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) our SPRINT Initiative has brought sexual and reproductive health to the humanitarian agenda, increased capacity and responded to a number of humanitarian emergencies. Australia has funded the SPRINT initiative since 2007 and has supported reaching 1,138,175 people to date and continues to respond to ongoing emergencies.   In each priority country, we work with an IPPF Member Association to coordinate and implement SPRINT activities. Through these partnerships, SPRINT helps strengthen the enabling environment, improve national capacity and provide lifesaving services during times of crisis.   You can read more about the SPRINT Initiative and IPPF Humanitarian’s Programme here.   Australian Government's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT)      Australia's location in the Indo-Pacific provides us with a unique perspective on humanitarian action. Australia is committed to helping partner governments manage crisis response themselves. This is done through building the capacity of the national government and civil society to be able to respond to disaster. DFAT also works with experienced international partners to prepare for and respond to disasters, including other donors, United Nations agencies, the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and non-government organisations.  

Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia

Ethiopia, the second most populous country in Africa, and the tenth most populous in the world, has enormous sexual and reproductive health (SRH) challenges as the statistics demonstrate.

The Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE) celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2015. It has a broad reach which focuses on providing poor and marginalized populations with family planning, safe abortion care, maternal and child health care, prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases (STIs) including HIV and AIDS and associated opportunistic infections.

In the shape of permanent clinics, mobile facilities, community-based services (CBSs), FGAE has numerous service points. Staff, backed by over thousands volunteers, hundreds of peer educators and of community-based distributors (CBDs). 

There’s no disguising the fact that achieving proper SRH amongst the Ethiopian people is an exhausting uphill struggle. FGAE has the will, the determination and the backing to fight for people’s rights and welfare.

Access is key to the Member Association’s activity, and it works extensively with young people to inform, educate and provide essential SRH services. FGAE also runs special projects targeted at particularly vulnerable individuals and groups: street children, people living with HIV and AIDS, sex workers, and young migrants in 8 of the 11 principal Regions in Ethiopia.

FGAE partners with government, with non-governmental organisations(NGOs) including the  Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Women, Children and Youth, UNFPA-Ethiopia, CARE-Ethiopia, DKT-Ethiopia, Dawn of Hope, the Ethiopian Women’s Lawyer Association, and a broad spectrum of HIV and AIDS-related operations.

Private sector partners include Betezata Hospital and Janmeda/medical bio laboratories, and donors to the Member Association’s work include the Royal Netherlands Embassy, the Packard Foundation, IPPF’s Japan Trust Fund, USAID/CDC and Irish Aid.

Website: www.fgaeet.org

 

Tewodros Kassa
24 September 2020

"My Experiences as a Health Journalist"- Tewodros Kassa (Ethiopia)

Tewodros Kassa is a 27-year-old journalist from Ethiopia, currently a reporter with the Ethiopian Herald. A holder of a BA degree in journalism and communications, Tewodros chose health journalism as his specialty. In this article, he shares his experiences as a health reporter, more so during this time of the COVID-19 pandemic. Tewodros is also a member of the IPPF Africa Region SRHR Journalists' Network.  Why did you choose to be a journalist? I chose journalism because I wanted to positively contribute to society by sharing information through telling powerful stories. I observed that many people faced difficulties in life due to lack of proper information, especially that related to their health. I wanted to fill this gap by empowering them with information that would enable them to make healthy decisions about their lives. Why did you choose to specialize in health journalism? I particularly chose health journalism because good health is critical to our survival and well-being. However, there remains a wide information gap when it comes to health. While there are so many important health issues to be covered, in Ethiopia, many media houses prioritize politics, business, and other agendas, with minimal space being given to health. My desire has always been to change this by advocating for more coverage of health issues and mobilizing policy makers and other stakeholders’ commitment towards a healthier society through well-told stories. Where do you get your stories from? I like reporting from a human-interest angle. This involves interviewing ordinary people in the field. Reporting this way helps my readers connect with the story better. Data and lengthy reports filled with jargon from scientists, researchers, medics and policymakers are best interpreted and told through the stories of individuals -the human-interest angle, and that is what I do. What is your daily routine like as a health journalist? Every morning, I make sure I catch up with global and local news as I keep myself updated. I then try to develop story ideas based on the health issues of the day. I also finish any pending stories I was working on. I am constantly in touch with my sources –who include health care professionals, patients, researchers and scientists as they are the ones who give me new information and help verify facts in their areas of expertise. Which is the most memorable story you have ever filed? It has to be the story I did titled “The covert life of Eskedar”. This was the story of a 35-year-old woman living in rural Ethiopia, and whose education was interrupted when she was married off at the tender age of 10. She went on to face abuse in her marriage, which she eventually left. In her struggle for survival, she ended up on the streets as a commercial sex worker, where she faced a myriad of challenges including sexual violence, harassment and exposure to sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV. Eskedar’s story inspired me to continue doing more reports that highlight issues of poverty, child marriage and the need for education of the girl child, as well as women’s empowerment.   What have some of your experiences been during COVID-19? My reporting experience during Covid-19 has no doubt been challenging. Staying at home and working from home is difficult as a journalist, especially when your work largely requires you to go out to the field to collect information. Restrictions on movement have affected our regular group discussion forums, attending of conferences and other public forums -all of which are platforms for harvesting good story ideas. However, conducting telephone interviews, use of social media and other digital technologies have allowed me to succeed in my reporting during the pandemic.  Social media has been of great benefit to me when reporting during COVID-19. I have attended many press conferences, webinars, conducted interviews and followed live proceedings of reports and briefings via social media. Besides, social media is faster than the mainstream media when it comes to disseminating stories to the public. I can also say that adhering to the stipulated COVID-19 safety mechanisms have helped me stay safe. I wear my face mask as required, washing hands properly, sanitize, stay home when it is necessary, and I observe social distancing while out there. How have you worked with IPPF’s Member Association during this time? Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE) has over the years played a supportive role for me as a journalist – something it has continued to do during this time of COVID-19. As I’m collecting information, FGAE always helps me find the right person for the interview, generate new ideas, access experts for my story, access data and other resources, among others. FGAE has helped me over the years in my health reporting. Tewodros spoke to Maryanne W. Waweru, Communications Officer, IPPF Africa Regional Office For more information about the work of IPPF Africa Region, connect with us on Facebook and Twitter.