- - -
bank-phrom-Tzm3Oyu_6sk-unsplash

News

Latest news from IPPF

Spotlight

A selection of news from across the Federation

Hear us roar 2

Africa

News item

IPPF Africa Region Quarterly Newsletter - March to June 2022

Quarterly Newsletter - March to June 2022.
Adapting family planning services in time of crisis introduction
news item

| 28 June 2021

Adapting family planning services in time of crisis: Innovations by the IPPF Africa Region Member Associations

  On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. The impact of the pandemic would be felt across the world in all sectors, including health, where major disruptions were witnessed. Access to basic health information and services, including sexual reproductive health (SRH) information and services became constrained owing to various government-led protective directives such as restrictions on movement, lockdowns and curfews. The pandemic also put a strain on IPPF Member Associations (MAs) across the world. MAs are IPPF affiliated locally owned health organizations which provide a wide range of sexual reproductive health information and services. The pandemic saw many MAs cut down on their services, with some having to shut down completely or suspend some of their operations in their static clinics, community-based outlets and mobile outreach services. Surveys conducted by the IPPF Africa Region in April and June 2020 to establish the impact of Covid 19 on its MAs established that a total of 1,405 service delivery points (SDPs) were reported to have been closed during round 1 of the survey while 2,161 SDPs were closed during round 2 out of the 13,049 service delivery points reported in 2019. 447 mobile clinics were also shut down. These disruptions affected people’s access to the essential sexual reproductive healthcare services provided in our MA facilities, such as family planning services, sexually transmitted infections services, maternal and child health services, among others. Young people were no longer able to congregate at the youth-friendly centers where they would access SRH information and services. This called for innovation on the part of IPPF in ensuring that the populations, especially the vulnerable and marginalized, continued accessing SRH services. Various partners came on board to mitigate the gap occasioned by COVID-19 by providing various resources for this, including financial resources. These donors included Global Affairs Canada (GAC), Levi Strauss Foundation and Danida. The Danida grant for COVID-19 was disbursed to 45 IPPF MAs in the Africa region and was geared towards filling the gap created by the pandemic by ensuring there was continued SRH service delivery despite the challenges. The interventions facilitated by these grants have yielded commendable results, as more than 100 million SRH services were reported in the Africa Region - mostly women, girls, the vulnerable and hard-to-reach populations have been able to access SRH information and services. The range of services, offered by the MAs in partnership with government agencies and development partners in the private sector, included ante-natal and post-natal care, childbirth services, family planning services, STI treatment and management services, Comprehensive Sexuality Education (CSE) for the young people, Sexual and Gender-Based Violence (SGBV) services. In a series of five case studies, we highlight some innovations and adaptations developed by IPPF Africa Region MAs, that enabled thousands of their target populations to continue accessing quality and affordable sexual reproductive health and rights (SRHR) information and services amidst the pandemic. Cameroun: Adopting a Home-based Service Delivery Approach Nigeria: Establishing Digital Health Interventions Zambia: Training Women on Self-Managed Care for Contraception Benin: Bringing Comprehensive Sexuality Education Online Sao Tome: A Clinic on Wheels 

Adapting family planning services in time of crisis introduction
news_item

| 28 June 2021

Adapting family planning services in time of crisis: Innovations by the IPPF Africa Region Member Associations

  On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. The impact of the pandemic would be felt across the world in all sectors, including health, where major disruptions were witnessed. Access to basic health information and services, including sexual reproductive health (SRH) information and services became constrained owing to various government-led protective directives such as restrictions on movement, lockdowns and curfews. The pandemic also put a strain on IPPF Member Associations (MAs) across the world. MAs are IPPF affiliated locally owned health organizations which provide a wide range of sexual reproductive health information and services. The pandemic saw many MAs cut down on their services, with some having to shut down completely or suspend some of their operations in their static clinics, community-based outlets and mobile outreach services. Surveys conducted by the IPPF Africa Region in April and June 2020 to establish the impact of Covid 19 on its MAs established that a total of 1,405 service delivery points (SDPs) were reported to have been closed during round 1 of the survey while 2,161 SDPs were closed during round 2 out of the 13,049 service delivery points reported in 2019. 447 mobile clinics were also shut down. These disruptions affected people’s access to the essential sexual reproductive healthcare services provided in our MA facilities, such as family planning services, sexually transmitted infections services, maternal and child health services, among others. Young people were no longer able to congregate at the youth-friendly centers where they would access SRH information and services. This called for innovation on the part of IPPF in ensuring that the populations, especially the vulnerable and marginalized, continued accessing SRH services. Various partners came on board to mitigate the gap occasioned by COVID-19 by providing various resources for this, including financial resources. These donors included Global Affairs Canada (GAC), Levi Strauss Foundation and Danida. The Danida grant for COVID-19 was disbursed to 45 IPPF MAs in the Africa region and was geared towards filling the gap created by the pandemic by ensuring there was continued SRH service delivery despite the challenges. The interventions facilitated by these grants have yielded commendable results, as more than 100 million SRH services were reported in the Africa Region - mostly women, girls, the vulnerable and hard-to-reach populations have been able to access SRH information and services. The range of services, offered by the MAs in partnership with government agencies and development partners in the private sector, included ante-natal and post-natal care, childbirth services, family planning services, STI treatment and management services, Comprehensive Sexuality Education (CSE) for the young people, Sexual and Gender-Based Violence (SGBV) services. In a series of five case studies, we highlight some innovations and adaptations developed by IPPF Africa Region MAs, that enabled thousands of their target populations to continue accessing quality and affordable sexual reproductive health and rights (SRHR) information and services amidst the pandemic. Cameroun: Adopting a Home-based Service Delivery Approach Nigeria: Establishing Digital Health Interventions Zambia: Training Women on Self-Managed Care for Contraception Benin: Bringing Comprehensive Sexuality Education Online Sao Tome: A Clinic on Wheels 

World Contraception Day 2020
news item

| 26 September 2020

IPPFAR Celebrates World Contraception Day 2020

Nairobi, 26 September 2020. Today, IPPF Africa Region joins the rest of the world in marking the World Contraception Day 2020. For over five decades, we have, through our network of over 39 Member Associations (MAs) in sub-Saharan Africa, responded to the contraceptive needs of millions of Africans. Contraceptive products offered through our MA’s static clinics, mobile clinics and community outreach programs have ensured that millions of women and girls have continued access to modern contraceptive options. Through the guidance of our highly skilled and well-trained healthcare workers, women and girls have made informed decisions about the most suitable family planning options for them. As a result, they have been able to avoid unplanned pregnancies (which may lead to unsafe abortions), and sexually transmitted infections (including HIV). Contraceptives have enabled women to space their children adequately, thus enhancing their quality of life and reducing maternal and infant mortality rates. It has also empowered millions of women and girls, enabling them to pursue their interests such as education and career, as well as business goals. In 2019, we empowered more than 32 million women and girls with Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights information and services in the sub-Saharan Africa Region. This year however, we mark the World Contraception Day under special circumstances. It comes when the world is reeling from the events of the COVID-19 pandemic. This unprecedented pandemic has caused major disruptions across all sectors including health systems, impacting greatly the access to contraception. Interruptions in supply chains have affected the effective distribution of contraceptive products, with stock-outs being experienced in many countries of sub-Saharan Africa. The unmet need for contraception is high, and undoubtedly worse during crisis situations. COVID-19 restrictions on movement have hampered women and girls’ access to health facilities for their regular contraceptive appointments. This has called for a change of strategy on the part of our MAs to ensure that women and girls still have access to family planning services. Despite the difficult times, they have ensured that healthcare workers are still available to offer services. Our MAs have also innovated their service and information delivery approaches, which have ensured that contraceptive products reach those who need them.    On this day, IPPF Africa Regional Office and its MAs reiterates the commitment to ensuring that the pandemic does not signify the end of people’s access to contraception, we will ensure to advocate and reaffirm our partnerships with other key players to re-emphasize the need why contraceptives are an essential component of women and girls’ healthcare. Media Contacts: -Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Officer, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) – Email: [email protected] -Sam Ntelamo, Resident Representative, International Planned Parenthood Federation, Liaison Office to the African Union & UNECA, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) – Phone: +251 (11) 667 0699/0761 - Mobile +251 (0) 944 73 2051- Email: [email protected]

World Contraception Day 2020
news_item

| 26 September 2020

IPPFAR Celebrates World Contraception Day 2020

Nairobi, 26 September 2020. Today, IPPF Africa Region joins the rest of the world in marking the World Contraception Day 2020. For over five decades, we have, through our network of over 39 Member Associations (MAs) in sub-Saharan Africa, responded to the contraceptive needs of millions of Africans. Contraceptive products offered through our MA’s static clinics, mobile clinics and community outreach programs have ensured that millions of women and girls have continued access to modern contraceptive options. Through the guidance of our highly skilled and well-trained healthcare workers, women and girls have made informed decisions about the most suitable family planning options for them. As a result, they have been able to avoid unplanned pregnancies (which may lead to unsafe abortions), and sexually transmitted infections (including HIV). Contraceptives have enabled women to space their children adequately, thus enhancing their quality of life and reducing maternal and infant mortality rates. It has also empowered millions of women and girls, enabling them to pursue their interests such as education and career, as well as business goals. In 2019, we empowered more than 32 million women and girls with Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights information and services in the sub-Saharan Africa Region. This year however, we mark the World Contraception Day under special circumstances. It comes when the world is reeling from the events of the COVID-19 pandemic. This unprecedented pandemic has caused major disruptions across all sectors including health systems, impacting greatly the access to contraception. Interruptions in supply chains have affected the effective distribution of contraceptive products, with stock-outs being experienced in many countries of sub-Saharan Africa. The unmet need for contraception is high, and undoubtedly worse during crisis situations. COVID-19 restrictions on movement have hampered women and girls’ access to health facilities for their regular contraceptive appointments. This has called for a change of strategy on the part of our MAs to ensure that women and girls still have access to family planning services. Despite the difficult times, they have ensured that healthcare workers are still available to offer services. Our MAs have also innovated their service and information delivery approaches, which have ensured that contraceptive products reach those who need them.    On this day, IPPF Africa Regional Office and its MAs reiterates the commitment to ensuring that the pandemic does not signify the end of people’s access to contraception, we will ensure to advocate and reaffirm our partnerships with other key players to re-emphasize the need why contraceptives are an essential component of women and girls’ healthcare. Media Contacts: -Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Officer, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) – Email: [email protected] -Sam Ntelamo, Resident Representative, International Planned Parenthood Federation, Liaison Office to the African Union & UNECA, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) – Phone: +251 (11) 667 0699/0761 - Mobile +251 (0) 944 73 2051- Email: [email protected]

Lucien Koakou, IPPF Africa Region Director
news item

| 26 January 2017

African Parliamentarians are Key to the Realization of the Demographic Dividend

Thursday 26 January 2017, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Investment in family planning, girls and young women, and investments in young people are crucial elements in Africa’s quest to harnessing the demographic dividend. Mr. Lucien Kouakou, the IPPFAR Regional Director says the potential of Africa to achieve its desired development status will be enhanced if countries place more emphasis on the Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) of its citizens, with a particular emphasis on young people.   “When the sexual reproductive health rights of adolescents and young people are protected, then they are better placed to make informed and responsible decisions about their lives. This enables them to stay healthy, avoid unwanted pregnancies, prevent Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) including HIV, stay in school longer and complete their education. They are also better placed to obtain the skills that will enable them to become economically productive. The result will be a generation of empowered people who have the number of children they want, and who they are able to adequately provide and care for. Investing in the reproductive health of young people is indeed a great way for African countries to accelerate their development,” he says. While noting the relation between demographic dynamics, economic growth and national development, as well as Africa’s goals towards realization of the Agenda 2063 and the Sustainable Development Goals, Mr. Kouakou alludes to the concerted effort of all stakeholders in this regard. “African citizens, governments, Civil Society Organizations, national and international development organizations, partners, African Parliamentarians and other stakeholders all play vital roles towards Africa’s development.” Mr. Kouakou made these remarks while addressing members of the Forum of African Parliamentarians on Population and Development (FPA) during a side event ahead of the 28th African Union summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. He particularly stressed on the need for African Legislators to increase their commitment towards the implementation of the African Union roadmap on harnessing the demographic dividend, and their collaborative efforts with local partners to ensure that the demographic dividend messages are domesticated –up to the grassroots level. During the International Conference of Parliamentary Networks on Population and Development held in Dakar, Senegal in November 2016, African Parliamentarians committed to supporting the implementation of the four pillars of the African Union road map; “Harnessing the Demographic Dividend through Investments in Youth”. The road map factors in the need to transform the potential of Africa’s large youth population into a demographic dividend. It focuses on four pillars that are critical to increasing investments in youth, driving change and positioning African countries on the path towards harnessing the demographic dividend. The four pillars include: Employment and entrepreneurship Education and skills development Health and well-being, and Rights, governance and youth employment The IPPFAR Regional Director congratulated the Parliamentarians for their assurances taking action geared at harnessing the demographic dividend. “It is inspiring to observe the dedication of our Parliamentarians, who are committed to the realization of the improved livelihoods of our African people, and more so their continued call for more investments in youth and their sexual reproductive health and rights,” he said.    Mr. Kouakou reiterated IPPFAR’s commitment to supporting African Parliamentarians in this cause, and reaffirmed the organization’s pledge to working with other development partners, including UNFPA and the African Union Commission –whom he congratulated for their dedication to the youth and demographic dividend theme this year.   Hon. Marie-Rose Nguini Effa, the FPA chairperson reiterated the body’s commitment to championing the demographic dividend cause at the national and regional levels, and thanked the various organizations supporting them with this regard. “We recognize the critical link between the population of a country and its ability to achieve sustainable economic development, and that the youth are the most important driving force of sustainable development and demographic transition of the continent. We thank organizations such as the African Union Commission, IPPFAR, UNFPA and the Japan Trust Fund (JTF) for their continued support," she said. IPPFAR is the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organization in Africa, and the leading sexual and reproductive health and rights advocacy voice in the region.

Lucien Koakou, IPPF Africa Region Director
news_item

| 26 January 2017

African Parliamentarians are Key to the Realization of the Demographic Dividend

Thursday 26 January 2017, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Investment in family planning, girls and young women, and investments in young people are crucial elements in Africa’s quest to harnessing the demographic dividend. Mr. Lucien Kouakou, the IPPFAR Regional Director says the potential of Africa to achieve its desired development status will be enhanced if countries place more emphasis on the Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) of its citizens, with a particular emphasis on young people.   “When the sexual reproductive health rights of adolescents and young people are protected, then they are better placed to make informed and responsible decisions about their lives. This enables them to stay healthy, avoid unwanted pregnancies, prevent Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) including HIV, stay in school longer and complete their education. They are also better placed to obtain the skills that will enable them to become economically productive. The result will be a generation of empowered people who have the number of children they want, and who they are able to adequately provide and care for. Investing in the reproductive health of young people is indeed a great way for African countries to accelerate their development,” he says. While noting the relation between demographic dynamics, economic growth and national development, as well as Africa’s goals towards realization of the Agenda 2063 and the Sustainable Development Goals, Mr. Kouakou alludes to the concerted effort of all stakeholders in this regard. “African citizens, governments, Civil Society Organizations, national and international development organizations, partners, African Parliamentarians and other stakeholders all play vital roles towards Africa’s development.” Mr. Kouakou made these remarks while addressing members of the Forum of African Parliamentarians on Population and Development (FPA) during a side event ahead of the 28th African Union summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. He particularly stressed on the need for African Legislators to increase their commitment towards the implementation of the African Union roadmap on harnessing the demographic dividend, and their collaborative efforts with local partners to ensure that the demographic dividend messages are domesticated –up to the grassroots level. During the International Conference of Parliamentary Networks on Population and Development held in Dakar, Senegal in November 2016, African Parliamentarians committed to supporting the implementation of the four pillars of the African Union road map; “Harnessing the Demographic Dividend through Investments in Youth”. The road map factors in the need to transform the potential of Africa’s large youth population into a demographic dividend. It focuses on four pillars that are critical to increasing investments in youth, driving change and positioning African countries on the path towards harnessing the demographic dividend. The four pillars include: Employment and entrepreneurship Education and skills development Health and well-being, and Rights, governance and youth employment The IPPFAR Regional Director congratulated the Parliamentarians for their assurances taking action geared at harnessing the demographic dividend. “It is inspiring to observe the dedication of our Parliamentarians, who are committed to the realization of the improved livelihoods of our African people, and more so their continued call for more investments in youth and their sexual reproductive health and rights,” he said.    Mr. Kouakou reiterated IPPFAR’s commitment to supporting African Parliamentarians in this cause, and reaffirmed the organization’s pledge to working with other development partners, including UNFPA and the African Union Commission –whom he congratulated for their dedication to the youth and demographic dividend theme this year.   Hon. Marie-Rose Nguini Effa, the FPA chairperson reiterated the body’s commitment to championing the demographic dividend cause at the national and regional levels, and thanked the various organizations supporting them with this regard. “We recognize the critical link between the population of a country and its ability to achieve sustainable economic development, and that the youth are the most important driving force of sustainable development and demographic transition of the continent. We thank organizations such as the African Union Commission, IPPFAR, UNFPA and the Japan Trust Fund (JTF) for their continued support," she said. IPPFAR is the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organization in Africa, and the leading sexual and reproductive health and rights advocacy voice in the region.

Adapting family planning services in time of crisis introduction
news item

| 28 June 2021

Adapting family planning services in time of crisis: Innovations by the IPPF Africa Region Member Associations

  On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. The impact of the pandemic would be felt across the world in all sectors, including health, where major disruptions were witnessed. Access to basic health information and services, including sexual reproductive health (SRH) information and services became constrained owing to various government-led protective directives such as restrictions on movement, lockdowns and curfews. The pandemic also put a strain on IPPF Member Associations (MAs) across the world. MAs are IPPF affiliated locally owned health organizations which provide a wide range of sexual reproductive health information and services. The pandemic saw many MAs cut down on their services, with some having to shut down completely or suspend some of their operations in their static clinics, community-based outlets and mobile outreach services. Surveys conducted by the IPPF Africa Region in April and June 2020 to establish the impact of Covid 19 on its MAs established that a total of 1,405 service delivery points (SDPs) were reported to have been closed during round 1 of the survey while 2,161 SDPs were closed during round 2 out of the 13,049 service delivery points reported in 2019. 447 mobile clinics were also shut down. These disruptions affected people’s access to the essential sexual reproductive healthcare services provided in our MA facilities, such as family planning services, sexually transmitted infections services, maternal and child health services, among others. Young people were no longer able to congregate at the youth-friendly centers where they would access SRH information and services. This called for innovation on the part of IPPF in ensuring that the populations, especially the vulnerable and marginalized, continued accessing SRH services. Various partners came on board to mitigate the gap occasioned by COVID-19 by providing various resources for this, including financial resources. These donors included Global Affairs Canada (GAC), Levi Strauss Foundation and Danida. The Danida grant for COVID-19 was disbursed to 45 IPPF MAs in the Africa region and was geared towards filling the gap created by the pandemic by ensuring there was continued SRH service delivery despite the challenges. The interventions facilitated by these grants have yielded commendable results, as more than 100 million SRH services were reported in the Africa Region - mostly women, girls, the vulnerable and hard-to-reach populations have been able to access SRH information and services. The range of services, offered by the MAs in partnership with government agencies and development partners in the private sector, included ante-natal and post-natal care, childbirth services, family planning services, STI treatment and management services, Comprehensive Sexuality Education (CSE) for the young people, Sexual and Gender-Based Violence (SGBV) services. In a series of five case studies, we highlight some innovations and adaptations developed by IPPF Africa Region MAs, that enabled thousands of their target populations to continue accessing quality and affordable sexual reproductive health and rights (SRHR) information and services amidst the pandemic. Cameroun: Adopting a Home-based Service Delivery Approach Nigeria: Establishing Digital Health Interventions Zambia: Training Women on Self-Managed Care for Contraception Benin: Bringing Comprehensive Sexuality Education Online Sao Tome: A Clinic on Wheels 

Adapting family planning services in time of crisis introduction
news_item

| 28 June 2021

Adapting family planning services in time of crisis: Innovations by the IPPF Africa Region Member Associations

  On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. The impact of the pandemic would be felt across the world in all sectors, including health, where major disruptions were witnessed. Access to basic health information and services, including sexual reproductive health (SRH) information and services became constrained owing to various government-led protective directives such as restrictions on movement, lockdowns and curfews. The pandemic also put a strain on IPPF Member Associations (MAs) across the world. MAs are IPPF affiliated locally owned health organizations which provide a wide range of sexual reproductive health information and services. The pandemic saw many MAs cut down on their services, with some having to shut down completely or suspend some of their operations in their static clinics, community-based outlets and mobile outreach services. Surveys conducted by the IPPF Africa Region in April and June 2020 to establish the impact of Covid 19 on its MAs established that a total of 1,405 service delivery points (SDPs) were reported to have been closed during round 1 of the survey while 2,161 SDPs were closed during round 2 out of the 13,049 service delivery points reported in 2019. 447 mobile clinics were also shut down. These disruptions affected people’s access to the essential sexual reproductive healthcare services provided in our MA facilities, such as family planning services, sexually transmitted infections services, maternal and child health services, among others. Young people were no longer able to congregate at the youth-friendly centers where they would access SRH information and services. This called for innovation on the part of IPPF in ensuring that the populations, especially the vulnerable and marginalized, continued accessing SRH services. Various partners came on board to mitigate the gap occasioned by COVID-19 by providing various resources for this, including financial resources. These donors included Global Affairs Canada (GAC), Levi Strauss Foundation and Danida. The Danida grant for COVID-19 was disbursed to 45 IPPF MAs in the Africa region and was geared towards filling the gap created by the pandemic by ensuring there was continued SRH service delivery despite the challenges. The interventions facilitated by these grants have yielded commendable results, as more than 100 million SRH services were reported in the Africa Region - mostly women, girls, the vulnerable and hard-to-reach populations have been able to access SRH information and services. The range of services, offered by the MAs in partnership with government agencies and development partners in the private sector, included ante-natal and post-natal care, childbirth services, family planning services, STI treatment and management services, Comprehensive Sexuality Education (CSE) for the young people, Sexual and Gender-Based Violence (SGBV) services. In a series of five case studies, we highlight some innovations and adaptations developed by IPPF Africa Region MAs, that enabled thousands of their target populations to continue accessing quality and affordable sexual reproductive health and rights (SRHR) information and services amidst the pandemic. Cameroun: Adopting a Home-based Service Delivery Approach Nigeria: Establishing Digital Health Interventions Zambia: Training Women on Self-Managed Care for Contraception Benin: Bringing Comprehensive Sexuality Education Online Sao Tome: A Clinic on Wheels 

World Contraception Day 2020
news item

| 26 September 2020

IPPFAR Celebrates World Contraception Day 2020

Nairobi, 26 September 2020. Today, IPPF Africa Region joins the rest of the world in marking the World Contraception Day 2020. For over five decades, we have, through our network of over 39 Member Associations (MAs) in sub-Saharan Africa, responded to the contraceptive needs of millions of Africans. Contraceptive products offered through our MA’s static clinics, mobile clinics and community outreach programs have ensured that millions of women and girls have continued access to modern contraceptive options. Through the guidance of our highly skilled and well-trained healthcare workers, women and girls have made informed decisions about the most suitable family planning options for them. As a result, they have been able to avoid unplanned pregnancies (which may lead to unsafe abortions), and sexually transmitted infections (including HIV). Contraceptives have enabled women to space their children adequately, thus enhancing their quality of life and reducing maternal and infant mortality rates. It has also empowered millions of women and girls, enabling them to pursue their interests such as education and career, as well as business goals. In 2019, we empowered more than 32 million women and girls with Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights information and services in the sub-Saharan Africa Region. This year however, we mark the World Contraception Day under special circumstances. It comes when the world is reeling from the events of the COVID-19 pandemic. This unprecedented pandemic has caused major disruptions across all sectors including health systems, impacting greatly the access to contraception. Interruptions in supply chains have affected the effective distribution of contraceptive products, with stock-outs being experienced in many countries of sub-Saharan Africa. The unmet need for contraception is high, and undoubtedly worse during crisis situations. COVID-19 restrictions on movement have hampered women and girls’ access to health facilities for their regular contraceptive appointments. This has called for a change of strategy on the part of our MAs to ensure that women and girls still have access to family planning services. Despite the difficult times, they have ensured that healthcare workers are still available to offer services. Our MAs have also innovated their service and information delivery approaches, which have ensured that contraceptive products reach those who need them.    On this day, IPPF Africa Regional Office and its MAs reiterates the commitment to ensuring that the pandemic does not signify the end of people’s access to contraception, we will ensure to advocate and reaffirm our partnerships with other key players to re-emphasize the need why contraceptives are an essential component of women and girls’ healthcare. Media Contacts: -Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Officer, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) – Email: [email protected]org -Sam Ntelamo, Resident Representative, International Planned Parenthood Federation, Liaison Office to the African Union & UNECA, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) – Phone: +251 (11) 667 0699/0761 - Mobile +251 (0) 944 73 2051- Email: [email protected]

World Contraception Day 2020
news_item

| 26 September 2020

IPPFAR Celebrates World Contraception Day 2020

Nairobi, 26 September 2020. Today, IPPF Africa Region joins the rest of the world in marking the World Contraception Day 2020. For over five decades, we have, through our network of over 39 Member Associations (MAs) in sub-Saharan Africa, responded to the contraceptive needs of millions of Africans. Contraceptive products offered through our MA’s static clinics, mobile clinics and community outreach programs have ensured that millions of women and girls have continued access to modern contraceptive options. Through the guidance of our highly skilled and well-trained healthcare workers, women and girls have made informed decisions about the most suitable family planning options for them. As a result, they have been able to avoid unplanned pregnancies (which may lead to unsafe abortions), and sexually transmitted infections (including HIV). Contraceptives have enabled women to space their children adequately, thus enhancing their quality of life and reducing maternal and infant mortality rates. It has also empowered millions of women and girls, enabling them to pursue their interests such as education and career, as well as business goals. In 2019, we empowered more than 32 million women and girls with Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights information and services in the sub-Saharan Africa Region. This year however, we mark the World Contraception Day under special circumstances. It comes when the world is reeling from the events of the COVID-19 pandemic. This unprecedented pandemic has caused major disruptions across all sectors including health systems, impacting greatly the access to contraception. Interruptions in supply chains have affected the effective distribution of contraceptive products, with stock-outs being experienced in many countries of sub-Saharan Africa. The unmet need for contraception is high, and undoubtedly worse during crisis situations. COVID-19 restrictions on movement have hampered women and girls’ access to health facilities for their regular contraceptive appointments. This has called for a change of strategy on the part of our MAs to ensure that women and girls still have access to family planning services. Despite the difficult times, they have ensured that healthcare workers are still available to offer services. Our MAs have also innovated their service and information delivery approaches, which have ensured that contraceptive products reach those who need them.    On this day, IPPF Africa Regional Office and its MAs reiterates the commitment to ensuring that the pandemic does not signify the end of people’s access to contraception, we will ensure to advocate and reaffirm our partnerships with other key players to re-emphasize the need why contraceptives are an essential component of women and girls’ healthcare. Media Contacts: -Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Officer, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) – Email: [email protected] -Sam Ntelamo, Resident Representative, International Planned Parenthood Federation, Liaison Office to the African Union & UNECA, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) – Phone: +251 (11) 667 0699/0761 - Mobile +251 (0) 944 73 2051- Email: [email protected]

Lucien Koakou, IPPF Africa Region Director
news item

| 26 January 2017

African Parliamentarians are Key to the Realization of the Demographic Dividend

Thursday 26 January 2017, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Investment in family planning, girls and young women, and investments in young people are crucial elements in Africa’s quest to harnessing the demographic dividend. Mr. Lucien Kouakou, the IPPFAR Regional Director says the potential of Africa to achieve its desired development status will be enhanced if countries place more emphasis on the Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) of its citizens, with a particular emphasis on young people.   “When the sexual reproductive health rights of adolescents and young people are protected, then they are better placed to make informed and responsible decisions about their lives. This enables them to stay healthy, avoid unwanted pregnancies, prevent Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) including HIV, stay in school longer and complete their education. They are also better placed to obtain the skills that will enable them to become economically productive. The result will be a generation of empowered people who have the number of children they want, and who they are able to adequately provide and care for. Investing in the reproductive health of young people is indeed a great way for African countries to accelerate their development,” he says. While noting the relation between demographic dynamics, economic growth and national development, as well as Africa’s goals towards realization of the Agenda 2063 and the Sustainable Development Goals, Mr. Kouakou alludes to the concerted effort of all stakeholders in this regard. “African citizens, governments, Civil Society Organizations, national and international development organizations, partners, African Parliamentarians and other stakeholders all play vital roles towards Africa’s development.” Mr. Kouakou made these remarks while addressing members of the Forum of African Parliamentarians on Population and Development (FPA) during a side event ahead of the 28th African Union summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. He particularly stressed on the need for African Legislators to increase their commitment towards the implementation of the African Union roadmap on harnessing the demographic dividend, and their collaborative efforts with local partners to ensure that the demographic dividend messages are domesticated –up to the grassroots level. During the International Conference of Parliamentary Networks on Population and Development held in Dakar, Senegal in November 2016, African Parliamentarians committed to supporting the implementation of the four pillars of the African Union road map; “Harnessing the Demographic Dividend through Investments in Youth”. The road map factors in the need to transform the potential of Africa’s large youth population into a demographic dividend. It focuses on four pillars that are critical to increasing investments in youth, driving change and positioning African countries on the path towards harnessing the demographic dividend. The four pillars include: Employment and entrepreneurship Education and skills development Health and well-being, and Rights, governance and youth employment The IPPFAR Regional Director congratulated the Parliamentarians for their assurances taking action geared at harnessing the demographic dividend. “It is inspiring to observe the dedication of our Parliamentarians, who are committed to the realization of the improved livelihoods of our African people, and more so their continued call for more investments in youth and their sexual reproductive health and rights,” he said.    Mr. Kouakou reiterated IPPFAR’s commitment to supporting African Parliamentarians in this cause, and reaffirmed the organization’s pledge to working with other development partners, including UNFPA and the African Union Commission –whom he congratulated for their dedication to the youth and demographic dividend theme this year.   Hon. Marie-Rose Nguini Effa, the FPA chairperson reiterated the body’s commitment to championing the demographic dividend cause at the national and regional levels, and thanked the various organizations supporting them with this regard. “We recognize the critical link between the population of a country and its ability to achieve sustainable economic development, and that the youth are the most important driving force of sustainable development and demographic transition of the continent. We thank organizations such as the African Union Commission, IPPFAR, UNFPA and the Japan Trust Fund (JTF) for their continued support," she said. IPPFAR is the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organization in Africa, and the leading sexual and reproductive health and rights advocacy voice in the region.

Lucien Koakou, IPPF Africa Region Director
news_item

| 26 January 2017

African Parliamentarians are Key to the Realization of the Demographic Dividend

Thursday 26 January 2017, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Investment in family planning, girls and young women, and investments in young people are crucial elements in Africa’s quest to harnessing the demographic dividend. Mr. Lucien Kouakou, the IPPFAR Regional Director says the potential of Africa to achieve its desired development status will be enhanced if countries place more emphasis on the Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) of its citizens, with a particular emphasis on young people.   “When the sexual reproductive health rights of adolescents and young people are protected, then they are better placed to make informed and responsible decisions about their lives. This enables them to stay healthy, avoid unwanted pregnancies, prevent Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) including HIV, stay in school longer and complete their education. They are also better placed to obtain the skills that will enable them to become economically productive. The result will be a generation of empowered people who have the number of children they want, and who they are able to adequately provide and care for. Investing in the reproductive health of young people is indeed a great way for African countries to accelerate their development,” he says. While noting the relation between demographic dynamics, economic growth and national development, as well as Africa’s goals towards realization of the Agenda 2063 and the Sustainable Development Goals, Mr. Kouakou alludes to the concerted effort of all stakeholders in this regard. “African citizens, governments, Civil Society Organizations, national and international development organizations, partners, African Parliamentarians and other stakeholders all play vital roles towards Africa’s development.” Mr. Kouakou made these remarks while addressing members of the Forum of African Parliamentarians on Population and Development (FPA) during a side event ahead of the 28th African Union summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. He particularly stressed on the need for African Legislators to increase their commitment towards the implementation of the African Union roadmap on harnessing the demographic dividend, and their collaborative efforts with local partners to ensure that the demographic dividend messages are domesticated –up to the grassroots level. During the International Conference of Parliamentary Networks on Population and Development held in Dakar, Senegal in November 2016, African Parliamentarians committed to supporting the implementation of the four pillars of the African Union road map; “Harnessing the Demographic Dividend through Investments in Youth”. The road map factors in the need to transform the potential of Africa’s large youth population into a demographic dividend. It focuses on four pillars that are critical to increasing investments in youth, driving change and positioning African countries on the path towards harnessing the demographic dividend. The four pillars include: Employment and entrepreneurship Education and skills development Health and well-being, and Rights, governance and youth employment The IPPFAR Regional Director congratulated the Parliamentarians for their assurances taking action geared at harnessing the demographic dividend. “It is inspiring to observe the dedication of our Parliamentarians, who are committed to the realization of the improved livelihoods of our African people, and more so their continued call for more investments in youth and their sexual reproductive health and rights,” he said.    Mr. Kouakou reiterated IPPFAR’s commitment to supporting African Parliamentarians in this cause, and reaffirmed the organization’s pledge to working with other development partners, including UNFPA and the African Union Commission –whom he congratulated for their dedication to the youth and demographic dividend theme this year.   Hon. Marie-Rose Nguini Effa, the FPA chairperson reiterated the body’s commitment to championing the demographic dividend cause at the national and regional levels, and thanked the various organizations supporting them with this regard. “We recognize the critical link between the population of a country and its ability to achieve sustainable economic development, and that the youth are the most important driving force of sustainable development and demographic transition of the continent. We thank organizations such as the African Union Commission, IPPFAR, UNFPA and the Japan Trust Fund (JTF) for their continued support," she said. IPPFAR is the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organization in Africa, and the leading sexual and reproductive health and rights advocacy voice in the region.