- - -
bank-phrom-Tzm3Oyu_6sk-unsplash

News

Latest news from IPPF

Spotlight

A selection of news from across the Federation

Zoe Flood_Somaliland_IPPF
News item

Quel prix pour un monde libéré des mutilations génitales féminines ?

Par Marie-Evelyne Pétrus-Barry et Anush Aghabalyan
Family_Planning_Togo
news item

| 12 December 2020

IPPFAR Statement on Universal Health Coverage (UHC) day

12 December 2020. Today, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) Africa Region joins the rest of the world in celebrating the Universal Health Coverage (UHC) day. The goal of UHC is to ensure that all people have access to high-quality health services without suffering financial hardship. A critical step to achieving this goal is the full realization of people’s access to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and more so, among women and girls. Owing to their unique needs and vulnerabilities, the success of UHC cannot be fully achieved until all women and girls can access the sexual reproductive health services they need. Each day, more than 800 women die from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. According to the World Health Organization, 94% of all maternal deaths occur in low and lower middle-income countries. 218 million women in these countries have an unmet need for modern contraception according to the Guttmacher Institute, which also states that 35 million women have abortions in unsafe conditions. A further 133 million do not receive the treatment they need for chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis and trichomoniasis. Cervical cancer, which is the fourth most common cancer among women globally is also a great challenge, with nearly 90% of the 311,000 deaths worldwide in 2018 occurring in these countries. These figures highlight the profound need to invest more in SRHR. Lack of high-quality sexual and reproductive health care undoubtedly puts women at risk for negative reproductive health outcomes. Weak health outcomes are strongly interrelated with gender inequalities, discrimination, violence and lack of SRHR information and services. It is therefore paramount that SRHR is integrated into UHC to protect gains and accelerate progress towards various goals, including the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The integration of SRHR into UHC requires addressing the multiple legal and sociocultural barriers that limit access to services and prevent women and girls from fulfilling their right to health. While governments are responsible for determining their own path towards UHC, this must be done in an accordance with agreed human rights treaties and commitments, including respecting and promoting SRHR. IPPF Africa Region is committed to addressing the challenges that impede the achievement of UHC, with particular focus on those pertaining to SRHR. On this day, we implore all African governments, donors and partners to call for greater investment in SRHR, and ensure that a comprehensive package of SRHR interventions is a fundamental part of national UHC policies, strategies and programmes. Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Media Contacts: Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Officer, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) - Email: [email protected]

Family_Planning_Togo
news_item

| 12 December 2020

IPPFAR Statement on Universal Health Coverage (UHC) day

12 December 2020. Today, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) Africa Region joins the rest of the world in celebrating the Universal Health Coverage (UHC) day. The goal of UHC is to ensure that all people have access to high-quality health services without suffering financial hardship. A critical step to achieving this goal is the full realization of people’s access to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and more so, among women and girls. Owing to their unique needs and vulnerabilities, the success of UHC cannot be fully achieved until all women and girls can access the sexual reproductive health services they need. Each day, more than 800 women die from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. According to the World Health Organization, 94% of all maternal deaths occur in low and lower middle-income countries. 218 million women in these countries have an unmet need for modern contraception according to the Guttmacher Institute, which also states that 35 million women have abortions in unsafe conditions. A further 133 million do not receive the treatment they need for chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis and trichomoniasis. Cervical cancer, which is the fourth most common cancer among women globally is also a great challenge, with nearly 90% of the 311,000 deaths worldwide in 2018 occurring in these countries. These figures highlight the profound need to invest more in SRHR. Lack of high-quality sexual and reproductive health care undoubtedly puts women at risk for negative reproductive health outcomes. Weak health outcomes are strongly interrelated with gender inequalities, discrimination, violence and lack of SRHR information and services. It is therefore paramount that SRHR is integrated into UHC to protect gains and accelerate progress towards various goals, including the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The integration of SRHR into UHC requires addressing the multiple legal and sociocultural barriers that limit access to services and prevent women and girls from fulfilling their right to health. While governments are responsible for determining their own path towards UHC, this must be done in an accordance with agreed human rights treaties and commitments, including respecting and promoting SRHR. IPPF Africa Region is committed to addressing the challenges that impede the achievement of UHC, with particular focus on those pertaining to SRHR. On this day, we implore all African governments, donors and partners to call for greater investment in SRHR, and ensure that a comprehensive package of SRHR interventions is a fundamental part of national UHC policies, strategies and programmes. Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Media Contacts: Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Officer, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) - Email: [email protected]

FHOK
news item

| 28 May 2018

FHOK’s Social Enterprise Model, SMART Care System Lauded by IPPFAR Member Associations

Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK), which is IPPF’s Member Association in Kenya this week played host to a team of Program Directors and Directors of Finance drawn from different Member Associations (MAs) in the Africa region. The Directors are in Nairobi attending a strategic workshop aimed at enhancing their capacity for the improvement of the programmatic, financial and operational management practices of their MAs. During one of their activities, which included the visit to FHOK’s headquarters in Nairobi, the Directors received insights into the different programs that FHOK is currently implementing. With a rich experience spanning over five decades, FHOK is recognized as one of the leading service providers in Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) in Kenya. FHOK has 16 health facilities and 9 youth centers located in different parts of the country. During the learning visit, FHOK shared its experiences in the areas of: clinical services, finance and administration, project implementation, governance, networking, building partnerships, advocacy and human resource. Some of the projects that FHOK is currently implementing include those around the integration of SRHR issues with environmental stability and climate change, mitigating the impact of the Global Gag Rule (GGR) through the social enterprise model, and innovative youth programmes that target both in-school and out-of-school youth. The Directors also toured FHOK’s Nairobi West Family Care Medical Center & Maternity. The center, started in 1999, operates on a 24-hour basis and offers a wide range of in and out-patient services. They include: counselling, family planning, STI treatment and management, HIV services, pre-nantal and post-natal care, maternity services, well baby clinics, gynaecological services, curative services and specialist clinics, among others. The medical center has a well-stocked pharmacy and a well-equipped laboratory. The visiting Directors lauded FHOK for its innovative projects and passion for serving the Kenyan population with quality health services. “Indeed, there is a lot to learn from FHOK. Their intense resource mobilization efforts, that have resulted in funding for several projects is impressive. This is something that other MAs should emulate,” said Mr. Desta Kebede, Program Director at Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE). “There is also plenty to learn from FHOK’s social enterprise model, which is fueled by the organization’s desire to shift its focus from traditional revenue streams -to that of using different entrepreneurial methods to create social impact,” he added. The Directors also commended FHOK for its electronic data management system -SMART Care. This is a system that has helped the organization effectively manage its operations such as in logistics, where it is able to use data to forecast and manage commodities. The use of SMART Care has helped the MA avoid cases of stock-outs. The paperless SMART Care system has also benefitted FHOK in the integration of finances and statistics, as well as in the management of human resources at clinic level. “SMART Care has significantly reduced the workload of our service providers when it comes to capturing of essential data in real time, and consequent generation of reports. Through SMART Care, consumer specific reports -MoH, FHOK, IPPF and donor reports are readily generated at the end of each month by our health personnel within a very short time. The system has gone a long way in ensuring quality data and enhancing compliance to reporting timelines within FHOK,” said Ms. Esther Muketo, Director, Resource Mobilization at FHOK. FHOK is also recognized as one of IPPFAR’s Learning Centers. IPPFAR’s Learning Center Initiative (LCI) is aimed at building capacity through its Member Association network by developing and sharing innovative and best practice approaches on Sexual Reproductive Health (SRH). Learning Centers such as FHOK are regarded as centers of excellence, technical hubs and technical advisory facilities. They assist in the cementing and positioning IPPFAR as a leading service provider in Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR). Story by Maryanne W. Waweru, Governance and Compliance Officer, IPPF Africa Region. For more information about the work of IPPF Africa Region, connect with us on Facebook and Twitter.

FHOK
news_item

| 25 May 2018

FHOK’s Social Enterprise Model, SMART Care System Lauded by IPPFAR Member Associations

Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK), which is IPPF’s Member Association in Kenya this week played host to a team of Program Directors and Directors of Finance drawn from different Member Associations (MAs) in the Africa region. The Directors are in Nairobi attending a strategic workshop aimed at enhancing their capacity for the improvement of the programmatic, financial and operational management practices of their MAs. During one of their activities, which included the visit to FHOK’s headquarters in Nairobi, the Directors received insights into the different programs that FHOK is currently implementing. With a rich experience spanning over five decades, FHOK is recognized as one of the leading service providers in Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) in Kenya. FHOK has 16 health facilities and 9 youth centers located in different parts of the country. During the learning visit, FHOK shared its experiences in the areas of: clinical services, finance and administration, project implementation, governance, networking, building partnerships, advocacy and human resource. Some of the projects that FHOK is currently implementing include those around the integration of SRHR issues with environmental stability and climate change, mitigating the impact of the Global Gag Rule (GGR) through the social enterprise model, and innovative youth programmes that target both in-school and out-of-school youth. The Directors also toured FHOK’s Nairobi West Family Care Medical Center & Maternity. The center, started in 1999, operates on a 24-hour basis and offers a wide range of in and out-patient services. They include: counselling, family planning, STI treatment and management, HIV services, pre-nantal and post-natal care, maternity services, well baby clinics, gynaecological services, curative services and specialist clinics, among others. The medical center has a well-stocked pharmacy and a well-equipped laboratory. The visiting Directors lauded FHOK for its innovative projects and passion for serving the Kenyan population with quality health services. “Indeed, there is a lot to learn from FHOK. Their intense resource mobilization efforts, that have resulted in funding for several projects is impressive. This is something that other MAs should emulate,” said Mr. Desta Kebede, Program Director at Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE). “There is also plenty to learn from FHOK’s social enterprise model, which is fueled by the organization’s desire to shift its focus from traditional revenue streams -to that of using different entrepreneurial methods to create social impact,” he added. The Directors also commended FHOK for its electronic data management system -SMART Care. This is a system that has helped the organization effectively manage its operations such as in logistics, where it is able to use data to forecast and manage commodities. The use of SMART Care has helped the MA avoid cases of stock-outs. The paperless SMART Care system has also benefitted FHOK in the integration of finances and statistics, as well as in the management of human resources at clinic level. “SMART Care has significantly reduced the workload of our service providers when it comes to capturing of essential data in real time, and consequent generation of reports. Through SMART Care, consumer specific reports -MoH, FHOK, IPPF and donor reports are readily generated at the end of each month by our health personnel within a very short time. The system has gone a long way in ensuring quality data and enhancing compliance to reporting timelines within FHOK,” said Ms. Esther Muketo, Director, Resource Mobilization at FHOK. FHOK is also recognized as one of IPPFAR’s Learning Centers. IPPFAR’s Learning Center Initiative (LCI) is aimed at building capacity through its Member Association network by developing and sharing innovative and best practice approaches on Sexual Reproductive Health (SRH). Learning Centers such as FHOK are regarded as centers of excellence, technical hubs and technical advisory facilities. They assist in the cementing and positioning IPPFAR as a leading service provider in Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR). Story by Maryanne W. Waweru, Governance and Compliance Officer, IPPF Africa Region. For more information about the work of IPPF Africa Region, connect with us on Facebook and Twitter.

Girl from Mauritania
news item

| 16 February 2018

Female Genital Mutilation is an Affront to the Gains Made in Human Rights

Despite the numerous global, regional and national protocols and legislative instruments to abolish female genital mutilation (FGM), the cruel and inhuman practice is still widely practiced by many traditional communities in Sub-Saharan Africa as a right for passage for girls. The United Nations estimates that he outmoded and life threatening customary practice  affects at least 200 million young girls and women globally; many of whom are in Sub-Saharan Africa. According to the UN Women, in Somalia, Guinea and Djibouti, 98%, 97% and 93% respectively of women aged 15 to 49 have undergone FGM.   Apart from abusing the rights of women, the crude way of performing the practice, endangers the reproductive health of thousands of young girls who are forced to go through it. In many instances the extent of mutilation affects the physical well-being and the health of the victims. The psychological trauma associated with the practice, affects the self-esteem and dignity of those who are forced into it. The call by the AU to Harness the Demographic Dividend for the socio-economic development of Africa would become a mirage if the future of young girls and women are destroyed through FGM. The time has come to establish more humane and better systems to prepare young girls to graduate into womanhood. In this way, a critical mass of assertive and critical thinkers of a new generation of women would be created to contribute towards  achieving  the African Union (AU) Agenda 2063 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). As the International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR), we take the stand that FGM must be purged! It has no health benefits to women but only harm. It erodes the gains we have made in Human Rights over the years. As the leading voice of sexual reproductive health rights in sub-Saharan Africa, we speak for the voiceless girls and young women who suffer this injustice. This practice combined with the conflicts, child marriage and teenage pregnancy specifically affects girls and young women. This brings a unique yet precarious destruction of basic human rights to health. This is why we need to be the champions in protecting their right to health and their access quality health services. The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR), wishes to reiterate the need for complete and total abolishing of the practice. As the leading voice of sexual and reproductive health rights (SRHR) in Sub-Saharan Africa, we speak for the voiceless girls and young women who suffer this injustice. IPPFAR is committed towards ensuring the achievement of SDGs 3 and 5 – Universal Access to Health and Gender Equality respectively. Through our Member Associations in 42 Sub-Saharan countries, we will safeguard, defend and promote SRHR. As world celebrates the International Day of Zero Tolerance for FGM, we call on the international community, governments, civil society organisations (CSOs) and state actors to come together to protect the rights of girls and women. With purpose of unity and dedication, the practice of FGM will be eliminated to save the lives and restore the dignity of millions of girls and women, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa.   Lucien Koukou, Regional Director – IPPFAR for International Day of Zero Tolerance to FGM

Girl from Mauritania
news_item

| 06 February 2018

Female Genital Mutilation is an Affront to the Gains Made in Human Rights

Despite the numerous global, regional and national protocols and legislative instruments to abolish female genital mutilation (FGM), the cruel and inhuman practice is still widely practiced by many traditional communities in Sub-Saharan Africa as a right for passage for girls. The United Nations estimates that he outmoded and life threatening customary practice  affects at least 200 million young girls and women globally; many of whom are in Sub-Saharan Africa. According to the UN Women, in Somalia, Guinea and Djibouti, 98%, 97% and 93% respectively of women aged 15 to 49 have undergone FGM.   Apart from abusing the rights of women, the crude way of performing the practice, endangers the reproductive health of thousands of young girls who are forced to go through it. In many instances the extent of mutilation affects the physical well-being and the health of the victims. The psychological trauma associated with the practice, affects the self-esteem and dignity of those who are forced into it. The call by the AU to Harness the Demographic Dividend for the socio-economic development of Africa would become a mirage if the future of young girls and women are destroyed through FGM. The time has come to establish more humane and better systems to prepare young girls to graduate into womanhood. In this way, a critical mass of assertive and critical thinkers of a new generation of women would be created to contribute towards  achieving  the African Union (AU) Agenda 2063 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). As the International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR), we take the stand that FGM must be purged! It has no health benefits to women but only harm. It erodes the gains we have made in Human Rights over the years. As the leading voice of sexual reproductive health rights in sub-Saharan Africa, we speak for the voiceless girls and young women who suffer this injustice. This practice combined with the conflicts, child marriage and teenage pregnancy specifically affects girls and young women. This brings a unique yet precarious destruction of basic human rights to health. This is why we need to be the champions in protecting their right to health and their access quality health services. The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR), wishes to reiterate the need for complete and total abolishing of the practice. As the leading voice of sexual and reproductive health rights (SRHR) in Sub-Saharan Africa, we speak for the voiceless girls and young women who suffer this injustice. IPPFAR is committed towards ensuring the achievement of SDGs 3 and 5 – Universal Access to Health and Gender Equality respectively. Through our Member Associations in 42 Sub-Saharan countries, we will safeguard, defend and promote SRHR. As world celebrates the International Day of Zero Tolerance for FGM, we call on the international community, governments, civil society organisations (CSOs) and state actors to come together to protect the rights of girls and women. With purpose of unity and dedication, the practice of FGM will be eliminated to save the lives and restore the dignity of millions of girls and women, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa.   Lucien Koukou, Regional Director – IPPFAR for International Day of Zero Tolerance to FGM

Pregnant-woman
news item

| 27 June 2017

Statement In Support Of Pregnant School Girls In Tanzania

IPPF Africa Region is concerned about the alleged statement by Tanzanian President HE John Pombe Magufuli. The warning that schoolgirls who have given birth should not be allowed to return to school is contrary to Regional and Global policy commitments that seek to protect Africa’s Youth, to which the United Republic of Tanzania is a signatory. The Republic of Tanzania has ratified several protocols at the continental level – and these include the Banjul Protocol, the Maputo Protocol and most recently the Maputo Plan of Action 2016-2030. The Banjul Protocol specifically states in article 17 that ‘Every individual shall have the right to education” and part of article 18 declares that “The State shall ensure the elimination of every discrimination against women; and also ensure the protection of the rights of women and the child as stipulated in international declarations and conventions.” Education is not only a human right in itself, but also enables access to almost all other human rights (UNESCO, 2016). The right to education is enshrined in Article 26 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (United Nations, 1948). Equal access to quality education is also an objective of Africa’s Agenda 2063 and the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. When a girl is not enrolled, or is pulled out of school for any reason whatsoever, her rights are violated, her opportunities are lost and her future options are limited. In light of the above, we would like to appeal to the government of the United Republic of Tanzania to review its overall position on the status of the girl child in the context of the Demographic Dividend, Maputo Plan of Action, Maputo Protocol and the African Youth Charter. We firmly believe that Africa can harness the Demographic Dividend through investing in youth, particularly young girls if their rights are preserved.

Pregnant-woman
news_item

| 27 June 2017

Statement In Support Of Pregnant School Girls In Tanzania

IPPF Africa Region is concerned about the alleged statement by Tanzanian President HE John Pombe Magufuli. The warning that schoolgirls who have given birth should not be allowed to return to school is contrary to Regional and Global policy commitments that seek to protect Africa’s Youth, to which the United Republic of Tanzania is a signatory. The Republic of Tanzania has ratified several protocols at the continental level – and these include the Banjul Protocol, the Maputo Protocol and most recently the Maputo Plan of Action 2016-2030. The Banjul Protocol specifically states in article 17 that ‘Every individual shall have the right to education” and part of article 18 declares that “The State shall ensure the elimination of every discrimination against women; and also ensure the protection of the rights of women and the child as stipulated in international declarations and conventions.” Education is not only a human right in itself, but also enables access to almost all other human rights (UNESCO, 2016). The right to education is enshrined in Article 26 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (United Nations, 1948). Equal access to quality education is also an objective of Africa’s Agenda 2063 and the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. When a girl is not enrolled, or is pulled out of school for any reason whatsoever, her rights are violated, her opportunities are lost and her future options are limited. In light of the above, we would like to appeal to the government of the United Republic of Tanzania to review its overall position on the status of the girl child in the context of the Demographic Dividend, Maputo Plan of Action, Maputo Protocol and the African Youth Charter. We firmly believe that Africa can harness the Demographic Dividend through investing in youth, particularly young girls if their rights are preserved.

IPPF European Network
news item

| 13 February 2017

IPPF European Network Regional Director visits Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK)

The IPPF European Network Regional Director Ms. Caroline Hickson has today paid a courtesy visit to the Executive Director of Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK), Mr. Edward Marienga. FHOK is IPPF’s Member Association in Kenya. Ms. Hickson is on a working visit to the IPPF Africa Regional Office located in Nairobi, Kenya. During the meeting, Mr. Marienga oriented Ms. Hickson on FHOK’s work in the country, whose core focus is the provision of quality sexual reproductive health and services to millions of men, women and young people. FHOK, a local Non-Governmental Organization has been a leading service provider of sexual and reproductive health services in the country for over five decades. With a strong grassroots network, FHOK is present in 14 Counties (out of 47), through its Family Care Medical Centers. Through innovative delivery programming and capacity building, FHOK particularly focuses on young people, marginalized groups, underserved and inaccessible populations in the country. FHOK has a pricing policy that offers affordable, quality and easily accessible services to all. The meeting between Ms. Hickson and Mr. Marienga also acted as an experience-sharing forum between the two parties, where both discussed best SRHR implementation practices. FHOK also showcased its successful business models including its Learning Center and other income-generation ventures, which have greatly contributed to the success and sustainability of the organization over the years. “Our work has also been greatly enhanced by the strong partnerships that we have formed with different stakeholders, chief among them the Government of Kenya. We recognize the invaluable support of the Government in the achievement of our goals, and regularly consult with them on various issues. We also collaborate with them in programme activities, such as cervical cancer screening, testing and treatment, as well as various HIV/AIDS activities –including at the grassroots level. FHOK works with other non-governmental organizations, community-based organizations, faith-based organizations, youth networks and other groups towards the realization of it's goals,” Mr. Marienga added. Other issues that were discussed included effective advocacy strategies in the push for supportive SRHR policies and legislations at local, national and regional levels.   Ms. Hickson commended FHOK for its work, saying that there was plenty to learn from the organization, and which can also be emulated by other Member Associations –including those in Europe. IPPF EN includes 39 Member Associations and collaborating partners in as many countries throughout Europe and Central Asia. The Region reaches from Iceland to Kyrgyzstan and from Russia to Israel, from some of the richest countries in the world to some of the poorest, from donor countries to recipient countries, from long-standing democracies to countries still struggling to find their way.  Learn more about IPPFEN here. Learn more about FHOK here.

IPPF European Network
news_item

| 09 February 2017

IPPF European Network Regional Director visits Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK)

The IPPF European Network Regional Director Ms. Caroline Hickson has today paid a courtesy visit to the Executive Director of Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK), Mr. Edward Marienga. FHOK is IPPF’s Member Association in Kenya. Ms. Hickson is on a working visit to the IPPF Africa Regional Office located in Nairobi, Kenya. During the meeting, Mr. Marienga oriented Ms. Hickson on FHOK’s work in the country, whose core focus is the provision of quality sexual reproductive health and services to millions of men, women and young people. FHOK, a local Non-Governmental Organization has been a leading service provider of sexual and reproductive health services in the country for over five decades. With a strong grassroots network, FHOK is present in 14 Counties (out of 47), through its Family Care Medical Centers. Through innovative delivery programming and capacity building, FHOK particularly focuses on young people, marginalized groups, underserved and inaccessible populations in the country. FHOK has a pricing policy that offers affordable, quality and easily accessible services to all. The meeting between Ms. Hickson and Mr. Marienga also acted as an experience-sharing forum between the two parties, where both discussed best SRHR implementation practices. FHOK also showcased its successful business models including its Learning Center and other income-generation ventures, which have greatly contributed to the success and sustainability of the organization over the years. “Our work has also been greatly enhanced by the strong partnerships that we have formed with different stakeholders, chief among them the Government of Kenya. We recognize the invaluable support of the Government in the achievement of our goals, and regularly consult with them on various issues. We also collaborate with them in programme activities, such as cervical cancer screening, testing and treatment, as well as various HIV/AIDS activities –including at the grassroots level. FHOK works with other non-governmental organizations, community-based organizations, faith-based organizations, youth networks and other groups towards the realization of it's goals,” Mr. Marienga added. Other issues that were discussed included effective advocacy strategies in the push for supportive SRHR policies and legislations at local, national and regional levels.   Ms. Hickson commended FHOK for its work, saying that there was plenty to learn from the organization, and which can also be emulated by other Member Associations –including those in Europe. IPPF EN includes 39 Member Associations and collaborating partners in as many countries throughout Europe and Central Asia. The Region reaches from Iceland to Kyrgyzstan and from Russia to Israel, from some of the richest countries in the world to some of the poorest, from donor countries to recipient countries, from long-standing democracies to countries still struggling to find their way.  Learn more about IPPFEN here. Learn more about FHOK here.

Lucien_Kouakou_and_Genet_Mengistu_of_FGAE
news item

| 31 January 2017

IPPF Africa Regional Director Visits Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE)

Monday 30 January 2017, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia The IPPF Africa Region Director Mr. Lucien Kouakou today paid a visit to the IPPF Member Association in Ethiopia –Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE). During his visit, Mr. Kouakou met with FGAE members of staff including the Executive Director Ms. Genet Mengistu, whom he congratulated for their remarkable work in providing quality sexual reproductive health services to millions of Ethiopians. Mr. Kouakou, who is in the capital city of Addis Ababa attending activities around the 28th AU Summit, encouraged the members of staff to carry on with their commendable work. “We are proud of FGAE. Just last year, the organization celebrated 50 years of exemplary service and success in Ethiopia. FGAE is recognized as the pioneer organization for the introduction of family planning in the country, and five decades later, it is one of the leading providers of comprehensive, integrated, quality and gender-sensitive sexual reproductive health programs and services focusing on youth, underserved and vulnerable populations in Ethiopia. In addition, the success of FGAE’s Learning Center, which works closely with the Government and other partners in building the capacity of healthcare providers in Ethiopia through provision of needs-based quality sexual reproductive health training, is admirable. Indeed, the laudable success of FGAE is to be emulated not only in Ethiopia, but across Africa,” he said. Mr. Kouakou also assured FGAE of IPPF’s continued technical, financial and material support in regards to achievements of the organization’s goals. He further encouraged the Member Association to strive to establish and maintain formidable partnerships with other development stakeholders in the country, among them the Government, international, regional and national organizations, as well as local grassroots entities. “If we are to achieve our goals for sustainable development, then we must embrace the partnership of other organizations that share in our vision and the vision of ‘the Africa we Want’. When organizations work together, then they are able to accelerate development goals of the country and the continent, he said. The Regional Director further encouraged the Member Association to step up its efforts in resource mobilization, especially from domestic sources. “The African continent must steer its own development. We have to drive our own development agenda by investing our resources into innovative development-driven initiatives. Funding our own programmes will help avert some of the challenges that many development institutions face today –such as dwindling international donor funds or complete cut-back of funds. It is time for Africa to support Africa’s development through ventures such as domestic funding,” he said. In July last year, IPPF Africa Region launched the African Citizens Initiative (ACI) for sexual and reproductive health, which is a peer-to-peer fundraising campaign that aligns with the Africa Union’s Agenda 2063 commitment to the principle of self-reliance as well as the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. The FGAE Executive Director, Ms. Genet Mengistu reiterated FGAE’s commitment to serving millions of Ethiopian men, women, youth and children through its unmatched services. She further reiterated the Regional Director’s call for the establishment of strategic partnerships with other development players towards the achievement of the organization’s goals. “We will endeavor to seek more partnerships at all levels, as this will help boost the delivery of our wide range of services. While in Addis Ababa, among key meetings that the Regional Director has participated in is the Forum of African Parliamentarians on Population and Development (FPA) side event, in which he called for more investment in family planning, girls and young people in the realization of harnessing the demographic dividend. He also called on African Parliamentarians to deliver on their commitments to the Dakar Declaration, in their capacity as key influencers. “Parliamentarians have the ability to influence their colleagues to push for the support and implementation of policies and legislations, especially those related to youth, health, population and development. They can call for more budgetary allocation to related Ministries such as those of Youth, Gender and Social Affairs, Health, Education Planning and Development, as well as other institutions that focus on the youth and their reproductive health. They can also take the lead in seeking innovative ways of mobilizing resources at the local level that would champion population and related issues. Seeking African solutions to African problems through domestic funding is one way to realizing Africa’s development, and we count on our Parliamentarians to champion this cause,” he said. Read the full article here: African Parliamentarians are Key to the Realization of the Demographic Dividend Story by Maryanne W. Waweru. For more updates on our work, follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Lucien_Kouakou_and_Genet_Mengistu_of_FGAE
news_item

| 30 January 2017

IPPF Africa Regional Director Visits Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE)

Monday 30 January 2017, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia The IPPF Africa Region Director Mr. Lucien Kouakou today paid a visit to the IPPF Member Association in Ethiopia –Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE). During his visit, Mr. Kouakou met with FGAE members of staff including the Executive Director Ms. Genet Mengistu, whom he congratulated for their remarkable work in providing quality sexual reproductive health services to millions of Ethiopians. Mr. Kouakou, who is in the capital city of Addis Ababa attending activities around the 28th AU Summit, encouraged the members of staff to carry on with their commendable work. “We are proud of FGAE. Just last year, the organization celebrated 50 years of exemplary service and success in Ethiopia. FGAE is recognized as the pioneer organization for the introduction of family planning in the country, and five decades later, it is one of the leading providers of comprehensive, integrated, quality and gender-sensitive sexual reproductive health programs and services focusing on youth, underserved and vulnerable populations in Ethiopia. In addition, the success of FGAE’s Learning Center, which works closely with the Government and other partners in building the capacity of healthcare providers in Ethiopia through provision of needs-based quality sexual reproductive health training, is admirable. Indeed, the laudable success of FGAE is to be emulated not only in Ethiopia, but across Africa,” he said. Mr. Kouakou also assured FGAE of IPPF’s continued technical, financial and material support in regards to achievements of the organization’s goals. He further encouraged the Member Association to strive to establish and maintain formidable partnerships with other development stakeholders in the country, among them the Government, international, regional and national organizations, as well as local grassroots entities. “If we are to achieve our goals for sustainable development, then we must embrace the partnership of other organizations that share in our vision and the vision of ‘the Africa we Want’. When organizations work together, then they are able to accelerate development goals of the country and the continent, he said. The Regional Director further encouraged the Member Association to step up its efforts in resource mobilization, especially from domestic sources. “The African continent must steer its own development. We have to drive our own development agenda by investing our resources into innovative development-driven initiatives. Funding our own programmes will help avert some of the challenges that many development institutions face today –such as dwindling international donor funds or complete cut-back of funds. It is time for Africa to support Africa’s development through ventures such as domestic funding,” he said. In July last year, IPPF Africa Region launched the African Citizens Initiative (ACI) for sexual and reproductive health, which is a peer-to-peer fundraising campaign that aligns with the Africa Union’s Agenda 2063 commitment to the principle of self-reliance as well as the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. The FGAE Executive Director, Ms. Genet Mengistu reiterated FGAE’s commitment to serving millions of Ethiopian men, women, youth and children through its unmatched services. She further reiterated the Regional Director’s call for the establishment of strategic partnerships with other development players towards the achievement of the organization’s goals. “We will endeavor to seek more partnerships at all levels, as this will help boost the delivery of our wide range of services. While in Addis Ababa, among key meetings that the Regional Director has participated in is the Forum of African Parliamentarians on Population and Development (FPA) side event, in which he called for more investment in family planning, girls and young people in the realization of harnessing the demographic dividend. He also called on African Parliamentarians to deliver on their commitments to the Dakar Declaration, in their capacity as key influencers. “Parliamentarians have the ability to influence their colleagues to push for the support and implementation of policies and legislations, especially those related to youth, health, population and development. They can call for more budgetary allocation to related Ministries such as those of Youth, Gender and Social Affairs, Health, Education Planning and Development, as well as other institutions that focus on the youth and their reproductive health. They can also take the lead in seeking innovative ways of mobilizing resources at the local level that would champion population and related issues. Seeking African solutions to African problems through domestic funding is one way to realizing Africa’s development, and we count on our Parliamentarians to champion this cause,” he said. Read the full article here: African Parliamentarians are Key to the Realization of the Demographic Dividend Story by Maryanne W. Waweru. For more updates on our work, follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Family_Planning_Togo
news item

| 12 December 2020

IPPFAR Statement on Universal Health Coverage (UHC) day

12 December 2020. Today, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) Africa Region joins the rest of the world in celebrating the Universal Health Coverage (UHC) day. The goal of UHC is to ensure that all people have access to high-quality health services without suffering financial hardship. A critical step to achieving this goal is the full realization of people’s access to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and more so, among women and girls. Owing to their unique needs and vulnerabilities, the success of UHC cannot be fully achieved until all women and girls can access the sexual reproductive health services they need. Each day, more than 800 women die from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. According to the World Health Organization, 94% of all maternal deaths occur in low and lower middle-income countries. 218 million women in these countries have an unmet need for modern contraception according to the Guttmacher Institute, which also states that 35 million women have abortions in unsafe conditions. A further 133 million do not receive the treatment they need for chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis and trichomoniasis. Cervical cancer, which is the fourth most common cancer among women globally is also a great challenge, with nearly 90% of the 311,000 deaths worldwide in 2018 occurring in these countries. These figures highlight the profound need to invest more in SRHR. Lack of high-quality sexual and reproductive health care undoubtedly puts women at risk for negative reproductive health outcomes. Weak health outcomes are strongly interrelated with gender inequalities, discrimination, violence and lack of SRHR information and services. It is therefore paramount that SRHR is integrated into UHC to protect gains and accelerate progress towards various goals, including the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The integration of SRHR into UHC requires addressing the multiple legal and sociocultural barriers that limit access to services and prevent women and girls from fulfilling their right to health. While governments are responsible for determining their own path towards UHC, this must be done in an accordance with agreed human rights treaties and commitments, including respecting and promoting SRHR. IPPF Africa Region is committed to addressing the challenges that impede the achievement of UHC, with particular focus on those pertaining to SRHR. On this day, we implore all African governments, donors and partners to call for greater investment in SRHR, and ensure that a comprehensive package of SRHR interventions is a fundamental part of national UHC policies, strategies and programmes. Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Media Contacts: Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Officer, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) - Email: [email protected]

Family_Planning_Togo
news_item

| 12 December 2020

IPPFAR Statement on Universal Health Coverage (UHC) day

12 December 2020. Today, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) Africa Region joins the rest of the world in celebrating the Universal Health Coverage (UHC) day. The goal of UHC is to ensure that all people have access to high-quality health services without suffering financial hardship. A critical step to achieving this goal is the full realization of people’s access to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and more so, among women and girls. Owing to their unique needs and vulnerabilities, the success of UHC cannot be fully achieved until all women and girls can access the sexual reproductive health services they need. Each day, more than 800 women die from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. According to the World Health Organization, 94% of all maternal deaths occur in low and lower middle-income countries. 218 million women in these countries have an unmet need for modern contraception according to the Guttmacher Institute, which also states that 35 million women have abortions in unsafe conditions. A further 133 million do not receive the treatment they need for chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis and trichomoniasis. Cervical cancer, which is the fourth most common cancer among women globally is also a great challenge, with nearly 90% of the 311,000 deaths worldwide in 2018 occurring in these countries. These figures highlight the profound need to invest more in SRHR. Lack of high-quality sexual and reproductive health care undoubtedly puts women at risk for negative reproductive health outcomes. Weak health outcomes are strongly interrelated with gender inequalities, discrimination, violence and lack of SRHR information and services. It is therefore paramount that SRHR is integrated into UHC to protect gains and accelerate progress towards various goals, including the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The integration of SRHR into UHC requires addressing the multiple legal and sociocultural barriers that limit access to services and prevent women and girls from fulfilling their right to health. While governments are responsible for determining their own path towards UHC, this must be done in an accordance with agreed human rights treaties and commitments, including respecting and promoting SRHR. IPPF Africa Region is committed to addressing the challenges that impede the achievement of UHC, with particular focus on those pertaining to SRHR. On this day, we implore all African governments, donors and partners to call for greater investment in SRHR, and ensure that a comprehensive package of SRHR interventions is a fundamental part of national UHC policies, strategies and programmes. Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Media Contacts: Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Officer, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) - Email: [email protected]

FHOK
news item

| 28 May 2018

FHOK’s Social Enterprise Model, SMART Care System Lauded by IPPFAR Member Associations

Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK), which is IPPF’s Member Association in Kenya this week played host to a team of Program Directors and Directors of Finance drawn from different Member Associations (MAs) in the Africa region. The Directors are in Nairobi attending a strategic workshop aimed at enhancing their capacity for the improvement of the programmatic, financial and operational management practices of their MAs. During one of their activities, which included the visit to FHOK’s headquarters in Nairobi, the Directors received insights into the different programs that FHOK is currently implementing. With a rich experience spanning over five decades, FHOK is recognized as one of the leading service providers in Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) in Kenya. FHOK has 16 health facilities and 9 youth centers located in different parts of the country. During the learning visit, FHOK shared its experiences in the areas of: clinical services, finance and administration, project implementation, governance, networking, building partnerships, advocacy and human resource. Some of the projects that FHOK is currently implementing include those around the integration of SRHR issues with environmental stability and climate change, mitigating the impact of the Global Gag Rule (GGR) through the social enterprise model, and innovative youth programmes that target both in-school and out-of-school youth. The Directors also toured FHOK’s Nairobi West Family Care Medical Center & Maternity. The center, started in 1999, operates on a 24-hour basis and offers a wide range of in and out-patient services. They include: counselling, family planning, STI treatment and management, HIV services, pre-nantal and post-natal care, maternity services, well baby clinics, gynaecological services, curative services and specialist clinics, among others. The medical center has a well-stocked pharmacy and a well-equipped laboratory. The visiting Directors lauded FHOK for its innovative projects and passion for serving the Kenyan population with quality health services. “Indeed, there is a lot to learn from FHOK. Their intense resource mobilization efforts, that have resulted in funding for several projects is impressive. This is something that other MAs should emulate,” said Mr. Desta Kebede, Program Director at Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE). “There is also plenty to learn from FHOK’s social enterprise model, which is fueled by the organization’s desire to shift its focus from traditional revenue streams -to that of using different entrepreneurial methods to create social impact,” he added. The Directors also commended FHOK for its electronic data management system -SMART Care. This is a system that has helped the organization effectively manage its operations such as in logistics, where it is able to use data to forecast and manage commodities. The use of SMART Care has helped the MA avoid cases of stock-outs. The paperless SMART Care system has also benefitted FHOK in the integration of finances and statistics, as well as in the management of human resources at clinic level. “SMART Care has significantly reduced the workload of our service providers when it comes to capturing of essential data in real time, and consequent generation of reports. Through SMART Care, consumer specific reports -MoH, FHOK, IPPF and donor reports are readily generated at the end of each month by our health personnel within a very short time. The system has gone a long way in ensuring quality data and enhancing compliance to reporting timelines within FHOK,” said Ms. Esther Muketo, Director, Resource Mobilization at FHOK. FHOK is also recognized as one of IPPFAR’s Learning Centers. IPPFAR’s Learning Center Initiative (LCI) is aimed at building capacity through its Member Association network by developing and sharing innovative and best practice approaches on Sexual Reproductive Health (SRH). Learning Centers such as FHOK are regarded as centers of excellence, technical hubs and technical advisory facilities. They assist in the cementing and positioning IPPFAR as a leading service provider in Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR). Story by Maryanne W. Waweru, Governance and Compliance Officer, IPPF Africa Region. For more information about the work of IPPF Africa Region, connect with us on Facebook and Twitter.

FHOK
news_item

| 25 May 2018

FHOK’s Social Enterprise Model, SMART Care System Lauded by IPPFAR Member Associations

Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK), which is IPPF’s Member Association in Kenya this week played host to a team of Program Directors and Directors of Finance drawn from different Member Associations (MAs) in the Africa region. The Directors are in Nairobi attending a strategic workshop aimed at enhancing their capacity for the improvement of the programmatic, financial and operational management practices of their MAs. During one of their activities, which included the visit to FHOK’s headquarters in Nairobi, the Directors received insights into the different programs that FHOK is currently implementing. With a rich experience spanning over five decades, FHOK is recognized as one of the leading service providers in Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) in Kenya. FHOK has 16 health facilities and 9 youth centers located in different parts of the country. During the learning visit, FHOK shared its experiences in the areas of: clinical services, finance and administration, project implementation, governance, networking, building partnerships, advocacy and human resource. Some of the projects that FHOK is currently implementing include those around the integration of SRHR issues with environmental stability and climate change, mitigating the impact of the Global Gag Rule (GGR) through the social enterprise model, and innovative youth programmes that target both in-school and out-of-school youth. The Directors also toured FHOK’s Nairobi West Family Care Medical Center & Maternity. The center, started in 1999, operates on a 24-hour basis and offers a wide range of in and out-patient services. They include: counselling, family planning, STI treatment and management, HIV services, pre-nantal and post-natal care, maternity services, well baby clinics, gynaecological services, curative services and specialist clinics, among others. The medical center has a well-stocked pharmacy and a well-equipped laboratory. The visiting Directors lauded FHOK for its innovative projects and passion for serving the Kenyan population with quality health services. “Indeed, there is a lot to learn from FHOK. Their intense resource mobilization efforts, that have resulted in funding for several projects is impressive. This is something that other MAs should emulate,” said Mr. Desta Kebede, Program Director at Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE). “There is also plenty to learn from FHOK’s social enterprise model, which is fueled by the organization’s desire to shift its focus from traditional revenue streams -to that of using different entrepreneurial methods to create social impact,” he added. The Directors also commended FHOK for its electronic data management system -SMART Care. This is a system that has helped the organization effectively manage its operations such as in logistics, where it is able to use data to forecast and manage commodities. The use of SMART Care has helped the MA avoid cases of stock-outs. The paperless SMART Care system has also benefitted FHOK in the integration of finances and statistics, as well as in the management of human resources at clinic level. “SMART Care has significantly reduced the workload of our service providers when it comes to capturing of essential data in real time, and consequent generation of reports. Through SMART Care, consumer specific reports -MoH, FHOK, IPPF and donor reports are readily generated at the end of each month by our health personnel within a very short time. The system has gone a long way in ensuring quality data and enhancing compliance to reporting timelines within FHOK,” said Ms. Esther Muketo, Director, Resource Mobilization at FHOK. FHOK is also recognized as one of IPPFAR’s Learning Centers. IPPFAR’s Learning Center Initiative (LCI) is aimed at building capacity through its Member Association network by developing and sharing innovative and best practice approaches on Sexual Reproductive Health (SRH). Learning Centers such as FHOK are regarded as centers of excellence, technical hubs and technical advisory facilities. They assist in the cementing and positioning IPPFAR as a leading service provider in Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR). Story by Maryanne W. Waweru, Governance and Compliance Officer, IPPF Africa Region. For more information about the work of IPPF Africa Region, connect with us on Facebook and Twitter.

Girl from Mauritania
news item

| 16 February 2018

Female Genital Mutilation is an Affront to the Gains Made in Human Rights

Despite the numerous global, regional and national protocols and legislative instruments to abolish female genital mutilation (FGM), the cruel and inhuman practice is still widely practiced by many traditional communities in Sub-Saharan Africa as a right for passage for girls. The United Nations estimates that he outmoded and life threatening customary practice  affects at least 200 million young girls and women globally; many of whom are in Sub-Saharan Africa. According to the UN Women, in Somalia, Guinea and Djibouti, 98%, 97% and 93% respectively of women aged 15 to 49 have undergone FGM.   Apart from abusing the rights of women, the crude way of performing the practice, endangers the reproductive health of thousands of young girls who are forced to go through it. In many instances the extent of mutilation affects the physical well-being and the health of the victims. The psychological trauma associated with the practice, affects the self-esteem and dignity of those who are forced into it. The call by the AU to Harness the Demographic Dividend for the socio-economic development of Africa would become a mirage if the future of young girls and women are destroyed through FGM. The time has come to establish more humane and better systems to prepare young girls to graduate into womanhood. In this way, a critical mass of assertive and critical thinkers of a new generation of women would be created to contribute towards  achieving  the African Union (AU) Agenda 2063 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). As the International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR), we take the stand that FGM must be purged! It has no health benefits to women but only harm. It erodes the gains we have made in Human Rights over the years. As the leading voice of sexual reproductive health rights in sub-Saharan Africa, we speak for the voiceless girls and young women who suffer this injustice. This practice combined with the conflicts, child marriage and teenage pregnancy specifically affects girls and young women. This brings a unique yet precarious destruction of basic human rights to health. This is why we need to be the champions in protecting their right to health and their access quality health services. The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR), wishes to reiterate the need for complete and total abolishing of the practice. As the leading voice of sexual and reproductive health rights (SRHR) in Sub-Saharan Africa, we speak for the voiceless girls and young women who suffer this injustice. IPPFAR is committed towards ensuring the achievement of SDGs 3 and 5 – Universal Access to Health and Gender Equality respectively. Through our Member Associations in 42 Sub-Saharan countries, we will safeguard, defend and promote SRHR. As world celebrates the International Day of Zero Tolerance for FGM, we call on the international community, governments, civil society organisations (CSOs) and state actors to come together to protect the rights of girls and women. With purpose of unity and dedication, the practice of FGM will be eliminated to save the lives and restore the dignity of millions of girls and women, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa.   Lucien Koukou, Regional Director – IPPFAR for International Day of Zero Tolerance to FGM

Girl from Mauritania
news_item

| 06 February 2018

Female Genital Mutilation is an Affront to the Gains Made in Human Rights

Despite the numerous global, regional and national protocols and legislative instruments to abolish female genital mutilation (FGM), the cruel and inhuman practice is still widely practiced by many traditional communities in Sub-Saharan Africa as a right for passage for girls. The United Nations estimates that he outmoded and life threatening customary practice  affects at least 200 million young girls and women globally; many of whom are in Sub-Saharan Africa. According to the UN Women, in Somalia, Guinea and Djibouti, 98%, 97% and 93% respectively of women aged 15 to 49 have undergone FGM.   Apart from abusing the rights of women, the crude way of performing the practice, endangers the reproductive health of thousands of young girls who are forced to go through it. In many instances the extent of mutilation affects the physical well-being and the health of the victims. The psychological trauma associated with the practice, affects the self-esteem and dignity of those who are forced into it. The call by the AU to Harness the Demographic Dividend for the socio-economic development of Africa would become a mirage if the future of young girls and women are destroyed through FGM. The time has come to establish more humane and better systems to prepare young girls to graduate into womanhood. In this way, a critical mass of assertive and critical thinkers of a new generation of women would be created to contribute towards  achieving  the African Union (AU) Agenda 2063 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). As the International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR), we take the stand that FGM must be purged! It has no health benefits to women but only harm. It erodes the gains we have made in Human Rights over the years. As the leading voice of sexual reproductive health rights in sub-Saharan Africa, we speak for the voiceless girls and young women who suffer this injustice. This practice combined with the conflicts, child marriage and teenage pregnancy specifically affects girls and young women. This brings a unique yet precarious destruction of basic human rights to health. This is why we need to be the champions in protecting their right to health and their access quality health services. The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR), wishes to reiterate the need for complete and total abolishing of the practice. As the leading voice of sexual and reproductive health rights (SRHR) in Sub-Saharan Africa, we speak for the voiceless girls and young women who suffer this injustice. IPPFAR is committed towards ensuring the achievement of SDGs 3 and 5 – Universal Access to Health and Gender Equality respectively. Through our Member Associations in 42 Sub-Saharan countries, we will safeguard, defend and promote SRHR. As world celebrates the International Day of Zero Tolerance for FGM, we call on the international community, governments, civil society organisations (CSOs) and state actors to come together to protect the rights of girls and women. With purpose of unity and dedication, the practice of FGM will be eliminated to save the lives and restore the dignity of millions of girls and women, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa.   Lucien Koukou, Regional Director – IPPFAR for International Day of Zero Tolerance to FGM

Pregnant-woman
news item

| 27 June 2017

Statement In Support Of Pregnant School Girls In Tanzania

IPPF Africa Region is concerned about the alleged statement by Tanzanian President HE John Pombe Magufuli. The warning that schoolgirls who have given birth should not be allowed to return to school is contrary to Regional and Global policy commitments that seek to protect Africa’s Youth, to which the United Republic of Tanzania is a signatory. The Republic of Tanzania has ratified several protocols at the continental level – and these include the Banjul Protocol, the Maputo Protocol and most recently the Maputo Plan of Action 2016-2030. The Banjul Protocol specifically states in article 17 that ‘Every individual shall have the right to education” and part of article 18 declares that “The State shall ensure the elimination of every discrimination against women; and also ensure the protection of the rights of women and the child as stipulated in international declarations and conventions.” Education is not only a human right in itself, but also enables access to almost all other human rights (UNESCO, 2016). The right to education is enshrined in Article 26 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (United Nations, 1948). Equal access to quality education is also an objective of Africa’s Agenda 2063 and the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. When a girl is not enrolled, or is pulled out of school for any reason whatsoever, her rights are violated, her opportunities are lost and her future options are limited. In light of the above, we would like to appeal to the government of the United Republic of Tanzania to review its overall position on the status of the girl child in the context of the Demographic Dividend, Maputo Plan of Action, Maputo Protocol and the African Youth Charter. We firmly believe that Africa can harness the Demographic Dividend through investing in youth, particularly young girls if their rights are preserved.

Pregnant-woman
news_item

| 27 June 2017

Statement In Support Of Pregnant School Girls In Tanzania

IPPF Africa Region is concerned about the alleged statement by Tanzanian President HE John Pombe Magufuli. The warning that schoolgirls who have given birth should not be allowed to return to school is contrary to Regional and Global policy commitments that seek to protect Africa’s Youth, to which the United Republic of Tanzania is a signatory. The Republic of Tanzania has ratified several protocols at the continental level – and these include the Banjul Protocol, the Maputo Protocol and most recently the Maputo Plan of Action 2016-2030. The Banjul Protocol specifically states in article 17 that ‘Every individual shall have the right to education” and part of article 18 declares that “The State shall ensure the elimination of every discrimination against women; and also ensure the protection of the rights of women and the child as stipulated in international declarations and conventions.” Education is not only a human right in itself, but also enables access to almost all other human rights (UNESCO, 2016). The right to education is enshrined in Article 26 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (United Nations, 1948). Equal access to quality education is also an objective of Africa’s Agenda 2063 and the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. When a girl is not enrolled, or is pulled out of school for any reason whatsoever, her rights are violated, her opportunities are lost and her future options are limited. In light of the above, we would like to appeal to the government of the United Republic of Tanzania to review its overall position on the status of the girl child in the context of the Demographic Dividend, Maputo Plan of Action, Maputo Protocol and the African Youth Charter. We firmly believe that Africa can harness the Demographic Dividend through investing in youth, particularly young girls if their rights are preserved.

IPPF European Network
news item

| 13 February 2017

IPPF European Network Regional Director visits Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK)

The IPPF European Network Regional Director Ms. Caroline Hickson has today paid a courtesy visit to the Executive Director of Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK), Mr. Edward Marienga. FHOK is IPPF’s Member Association in Kenya. Ms. Hickson is on a working visit to the IPPF Africa Regional Office located in Nairobi, Kenya. During the meeting, Mr. Marienga oriented Ms. Hickson on FHOK’s work in the country, whose core focus is the provision of quality sexual reproductive health and services to millions of men, women and young people. FHOK, a local Non-Governmental Organization has been a leading service provider of sexual and reproductive health services in the country for over five decades. With a strong grassroots network, FHOK is present in 14 Counties (out of 47), through its Family Care Medical Centers. Through innovative delivery programming and capacity building, FHOK particularly focuses on young people, marginalized groups, underserved and inaccessible populations in the country. FHOK has a pricing policy that offers affordable, quality and easily accessible services to all. The meeting between Ms. Hickson and Mr. Marienga also acted as an experience-sharing forum between the two parties, where both discussed best SRHR implementation practices. FHOK also showcased its successful business models including its Learning Center and other income-generation ventures, which have greatly contributed to the success and sustainability of the organization over the years. “Our work has also been greatly enhanced by the strong partnerships that we have formed with different stakeholders, chief among them the Government of Kenya. We recognize the invaluable support of the Government in the achievement of our goals, and regularly consult with them on various issues. We also collaborate with them in programme activities, such as cervical cancer screening, testing and treatment, as well as various HIV/AIDS activities –including at the grassroots level. FHOK works with other non-governmental organizations, community-based organizations, faith-based organizations, youth networks and other groups towards the realization of it's goals,” Mr. Marienga added. Other issues that were discussed included effective advocacy strategies in the push for supportive SRHR policies and legislations at local, national and regional levels.   Ms. Hickson commended FHOK for its work, saying that there was plenty to learn from the organization, and which can also be emulated by other Member Associations –including those in Europe. IPPF EN includes 39 Member Associations and collaborating partners in as many countries throughout Europe and Central Asia. The Region reaches from Iceland to Kyrgyzstan and from Russia to Israel, from some of the richest countries in the world to some of the poorest, from donor countries to recipient countries, from long-standing democracies to countries still struggling to find their way.  Learn more about IPPFEN here. Learn more about FHOK here.

IPPF European Network
news_item

| 09 February 2017

IPPF European Network Regional Director visits Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK)

The IPPF European Network Regional Director Ms. Caroline Hickson has today paid a courtesy visit to the Executive Director of Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK), Mr. Edward Marienga. FHOK is IPPF’s Member Association in Kenya. Ms. Hickson is on a working visit to the IPPF Africa Regional Office located in Nairobi, Kenya. During the meeting, Mr. Marienga oriented Ms. Hickson on FHOK’s work in the country, whose core focus is the provision of quality sexual reproductive health and services to millions of men, women and young people. FHOK, a local Non-Governmental Organization has been a leading service provider of sexual and reproductive health services in the country for over five decades. With a strong grassroots network, FHOK is present in 14 Counties (out of 47), through its Family Care Medical Centers. Through innovative delivery programming and capacity building, FHOK particularly focuses on young people, marginalized groups, underserved and inaccessible populations in the country. FHOK has a pricing policy that offers affordable, quality and easily accessible services to all. The meeting between Ms. Hickson and Mr. Marienga also acted as an experience-sharing forum between the two parties, where both discussed best SRHR implementation practices. FHOK also showcased its successful business models including its Learning Center and other income-generation ventures, which have greatly contributed to the success and sustainability of the organization over the years. “Our work has also been greatly enhanced by the strong partnerships that we have formed with different stakeholders, chief among them the Government of Kenya. We recognize the invaluable support of the Government in the achievement of our goals, and regularly consult with them on various issues. We also collaborate with them in programme activities, such as cervical cancer screening, testing and treatment, as well as various HIV/AIDS activities –including at the grassroots level. FHOK works with other non-governmental organizations, community-based organizations, faith-based organizations, youth networks and other groups towards the realization of it's goals,” Mr. Marienga added. Other issues that were discussed included effective advocacy strategies in the push for supportive SRHR policies and legislations at local, national and regional levels.   Ms. Hickson commended FHOK for its work, saying that there was plenty to learn from the organization, and which can also be emulated by other Member Associations –including those in Europe. IPPF EN includes 39 Member Associations and collaborating partners in as many countries throughout Europe and Central Asia. The Region reaches from Iceland to Kyrgyzstan and from Russia to Israel, from some of the richest countries in the world to some of the poorest, from donor countries to recipient countries, from long-standing democracies to countries still struggling to find their way.  Learn more about IPPFEN here. Learn more about FHOK here.

Lucien_Kouakou_and_Genet_Mengistu_of_FGAE
news item

| 31 January 2017

IPPF Africa Regional Director Visits Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE)

Monday 30 January 2017, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia The IPPF Africa Region Director Mr. Lucien Kouakou today paid a visit to the IPPF Member Association in Ethiopia –Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE). During his visit, Mr. Kouakou met with FGAE members of staff including the Executive Director Ms. Genet Mengistu, whom he congratulated for their remarkable work in providing quality sexual reproductive health services to millions of Ethiopians. Mr. Kouakou, who is in the capital city of Addis Ababa attending activities around the 28th AU Summit, encouraged the members of staff to carry on with their commendable work. “We are proud of FGAE. Just last year, the organization celebrated 50 years of exemplary service and success in Ethiopia. FGAE is recognized as the pioneer organization for the introduction of family planning in the country, and five decades later, it is one of the leading providers of comprehensive, integrated, quality and gender-sensitive sexual reproductive health programs and services focusing on youth, underserved and vulnerable populations in Ethiopia. In addition, the success of FGAE’s Learning Center, which works closely with the Government and other partners in building the capacity of healthcare providers in Ethiopia through provision of needs-based quality sexual reproductive health training, is admirable. Indeed, the laudable success of FGAE is to be emulated not only in Ethiopia, but across Africa,” he said. Mr. Kouakou also assured FGAE of IPPF’s continued technical, financial and material support in regards to achievements of the organization’s goals. He further encouraged the Member Association to strive to establish and maintain formidable partnerships with other development stakeholders in the country, among them the Government, international, regional and national organizations, as well as local grassroots entities. “If we are to achieve our goals for sustainable development, then we must embrace the partnership of other organizations that share in our vision and the vision of ‘the Africa we Want’. When organizations work together, then they are able to accelerate development goals of the country and the continent, he said. The Regional Director further encouraged the Member Association to step up its efforts in resource mobilization, especially from domestic sources. “The African continent must steer its own development. We have to drive our own development agenda by investing our resources into innovative development-driven initiatives. Funding our own programmes will help avert some of the challenges that many development institutions face today –such as dwindling international donor funds or complete cut-back of funds. It is time for Africa to support Africa’s development through ventures such as domestic funding,” he said. In July last year, IPPF Africa Region launched the African Citizens Initiative (ACI) for sexual and reproductive health, which is a peer-to-peer fundraising campaign that aligns with the Africa Union’s Agenda 2063 commitment to the principle of self-reliance as well as the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. The FGAE Executive Director, Ms. Genet Mengistu reiterated FGAE’s commitment to serving millions of Ethiopian men, women, youth and children through its unmatched services. She further reiterated the Regional Director’s call for the establishment of strategic partnerships with other development players towards the achievement of the organization’s goals. “We will endeavor to seek more partnerships at all levels, as this will help boost the delivery of our wide range of services. While in Addis Ababa, among key meetings that the Regional Director has participated in is the Forum of African Parliamentarians on Population and Development (FPA) side event, in which he called for more investment in family planning, girls and young people in the realization of harnessing the demographic dividend. He also called on African Parliamentarians to deliver on their commitments to the Dakar Declaration, in their capacity as key influencers. “Parliamentarians have the ability to influence their colleagues to push for the support and implementation of policies and legislations, especially those related to youth, health, population and development. They can call for more budgetary allocation to related Ministries such as those of Youth, Gender and Social Affairs, Health, Education Planning and Development, as well as other institutions that focus on the youth and their reproductive health. They can also take the lead in seeking innovative ways of mobilizing resources at the local level that would champion population and related issues. Seeking African solutions to African problems through domestic funding is one way to realizing Africa’s development, and we count on our Parliamentarians to champion this cause,” he said. Read the full article here: African Parliamentarians are Key to the Realization of the Demographic Dividend Story by Maryanne W. Waweru. For more updates on our work, follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Lucien_Kouakou_and_Genet_Mengistu_of_FGAE
news_item

| 30 January 2017

IPPF Africa Regional Director Visits Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE)

Monday 30 January 2017, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia The IPPF Africa Region Director Mr. Lucien Kouakou today paid a visit to the IPPF Member Association in Ethiopia –Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE). During his visit, Mr. Kouakou met with FGAE members of staff including the Executive Director Ms. Genet Mengistu, whom he congratulated for their remarkable work in providing quality sexual reproductive health services to millions of Ethiopians. Mr. Kouakou, who is in the capital city of Addis Ababa attending activities around the 28th AU Summit, encouraged the members of staff to carry on with their commendable work. “We are proud of FGAE. Just last year, the organization celebrated 50 years of exemplary service and success in Ethiopia. FGAE is recognized as the pioneer organization for the introduction of family planning in the country, and five decades later, it is one of the leading providers of comprehensive, integrated, quality and gender-sensitive sexual reproductive health programs and services focusing on youth, underserved and vulnerable populations in Ethiopia. In addition, the success of FGAE’s Learning Center, which works closely with the Government and other partners in building the capacity of healthcare providers in Ethiopia through provision of needs-based quality sexual reproductive health training, is admirable. Indeed, the laudable success of FGAE is to be emulated not only in Ethiopia, but across Africa,” he said. Mr. Kouakou also assured FGAE of IPPF’s continued technical, financial and material support in regards to achievements of the organization’s goals. He further encouraged the Member Association to strive to establish and maintain formidable partnerships with other development stakeholders in the country, among them the Government, international, regional and national organizations, as well as local grassroots entities. “If we are to achieve our goals for sustainable development, then we must embrace the partnership of other organizations that share in our vision and the vision of ‘the Africa we Want’. When organizations work together, then they are able to accelerate development goals of the country and the continent, he said. The Regional Director further encouraged the Member Association to step up its efforts in resource mobilization, especially from domestic sources. “The African continent must steer its own development. We have to drive our own development agenda by investing our resources into innovative development-driven initiatives. Funding our own programmes will help avert some of the challenges that many development institutions face today –such as dwindling international donor funds or complete cut-back of funds. It is time for Africa to support Africa’s development through ventures such as domestic funding,” he said. In July last year, IPPF Africa Region launched the African Citizens Initiative (ACI) for sexual and reproductive health, which is a peer-to-peer fundraising campaign that aligns with the Africa Union’s Agenda 2063 commitment to the principle of self-reliance as well as the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. The FGAE Executive Director, Ms. Genet Mengistu reiterated FGAE’s commitment to serving millions of Ethiopian men, women, youth and children through its unmatched services. She further reiterated the Regional Director’s call for the establishment of strategic partnerships with other development players towards the achievement of the organization’s goals. “We will endeavor to seek more partnerships at all levels, as this will help boost the delivery of our wide range of services. While in Addis Ababa, among key meetings that the Regional Director has participated in is the Forum of African Parliamentarians on Population and Development (FPA) side event, in which he called for more investment in family planning, girls and young people in the realization of harnessing the demographic dividend. He also called on African Parliamentarians to deliver on their commitments to the Dakar Declaration, in their capacity as key influencers. “Parliamentarians have the ability to influence their colleagues to push for the support and implementation of policies and legislations, especially those related to youth, health, population and development. They can call for more budgetary allocation to related Ministries such as those of Youth, Gender and Social Affairs, Health, Education Planning and Development, as well as other institutions that focus on the youth and their reproductive health. They can also take the lead in seeking innovative ways of mobilizing resources at the local level that would champion population and related issues. Seeking African solutions to African problems through domestic funding is one way to realizing Africa’s development, and we count on our Parliamentarians to champion this cause,” he said. Read the full article here: African Parliamentarians are Key to the Realization of the Demographic Dividend Story by Maryanne W. Waweru. For more updates on our work, follow us on Facebook and Twitter