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Quel prix pour un monde libéré des mutilations génitales féminines ?

Par Marie-Evelyne Pétrus-Barry et Anush Aghabalyan

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International Youth Day
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| 12 August 2021

IPPFAR Celebrates International Youth Day 2021: “Transforming Food Systems: Youth Innovation for Human and Planetary Health”

Addis Ababa, 12 August 2021 – In commemoration of the International Youth Day, The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region, through its Sub-Office to the African Union and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa hosted a virtual panel discussion on Youth, Gender Equality and Sexual Reproductive Health Rights in Transforming African Food Systems on 12 August 2021. The virtual panel discussion focused on the role of youth in advocacy towards gender equality and sustainable healthy food systems. The event also aimed at sharing recommendations to support young people's meaningful engagement in advocacy on inclusive food systems for the realization of sexual reproductive health rights on the African continent. Africa has the youngest population in the world with more than 400 million people between the ages of 15 and 35 years, which requires increased investment in economic and social development factors to improve the Development Index of its countries.   This year’s International Youth Day, celebrated under the theme: “Transforming Food Systems: Youth Innovation for Human and Planetary Health”, offers an opportunity to reflect on the interlinkages between sexual reproductive health and rights and nutrition, and on the intersectional aspects of food systems in the context of gender. “The International Youth Day helps bring attention to our issues. Young people are increasingly interested in sexual reproductive health and rights and understand, now more than ever, the importance of sexual health knowledge”, said Ms. Rosa Ayong, moderator of the panel discussion and a youth member of the IPPF Global Board of Trustees. The virtual round table panelists included Mr. Kassoum Coulibaly, President of the Global Institute for Women’s Empowerment Group, who spoke about the role of young people in promoting an inclusive food system. ‘’The International Youth Day, is a moment to evaluate our progress, empower young girls and boys, and strengthen their leadership role in the world's transformation with a gender equality vision," said Mr. Coulibaly. Panelists also included Ms. Chantal Umuhoza, who addressed the intersectional aspects of food systems in the context of gender and age, and Mr. Joshua Atabinore Akharigeya, who highlighted the impact of sexual reproductive health and rights on the food value chain from production to marketing. “Discussing Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights within the context of food value chain is ever critical. A healthy community ensures productivity and success across the food value chain, and in return, individuals and communities are economically empowered to access quality sexual reproductive health and rights services, seek justice and reduce their vulnerabilities - especially for girls and women - against sexual and gender-based violence”, said Mr. Akharigeya. Keynote speaker and Deputy Director of the UN World Food Program African Union Global Office, Ms. Magdalena Moshi, said that “actions should be taken by all stakeholders, to promote and advocate for the consumption of wholesome, nutrient dense foods for the realisation of sexual reproductive health, particularly for the female youth, as consumers". The discussions enabled youth participants to learn about their role in promoting an inclusive food system by advocating for sexual health rights through regional advocacy policies and frameworks. Giving youth a voice is a prerequisite for Africa’s transformation. Expanding opportunities for youth, women, and girls is an obligation that is essential in realizing everyone’s right to food security, nutrition, and sexual reproductive health. END Media Contacts: -Mahmoud Garga, Lead Specialist - Strategic Communication, Media Relations and Digital Campaigning, IPPF Africa Regional Office (IPPFARO) – email: [email protected] -Phone +254 704 626 920 Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Office, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) - Email: [email protected] – Phone: +254 707 952 990   ABOUT IPPF AFRICA REGION (IPPFAR) The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organization in Africa, and the leading sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy voice in the region. Headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, the overarching goal of IPPFAR is to increase access to SRHR services to the most vulnerable youth, men and women in sub-Saharan Africa. Supported by thousands of volunteers, IPPFAR tackles the continent’s growing SRHR challenges through a network of Member Associations (MAs) in 39 countries. We do this by developing our MAs into efficient entities with the capacity to deliver and sustain high quality, youth focused and gender sensitive services. We work with governments, the African Union, Regional Economic Commissions, the Pan-African Parliament, United Nations bodies among others to expand political and financial commitments to sexual and reproductive health and rights in Africa. Learn more about us on our website. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

International Youth Day
news_item

| 12 August 2021

IPPFAR Celebrates International Youth Day 2021: “Transforming Food Systems: Youth Innovation for Human and Planetary Health”

Addis Ababa, 12 August 2021 – In commemoration of the International Youth Day, The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region, through its Sub-Office to the African Union and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa hosted a virtual panel discussion on Youth, Gender Equality and Sexual Reproductive Health Rights in Transforming African Food Systems on 12 August 2021. The virtual panel discussion focused on the role of youth in advocacy towards gender equality and sustainable healthy food systems. The event also aimed at sharing recommendations to support young people's meaningful engagement in advocacy on inclusive food systems for the realization of sexual reproductive health rights on the African continent. Africa has the youngest population in the world with more than 400 million people between the ages of 15 and 35 years, which requires increased investment in economic and social development factors to improve the Development Index of its countries.   This year’s International Youth Day, celebrated under the theme: “Transforming Food Systems: Youth Innovation for Human and Planetary Health”, offers an opportunity to reflect on the interlinkages between sexual reproductive health and rights and nutrition, and on the intersectional aspects of food systems in the context of gender. “The International Youth Day helps bring attention to our issues. Young people are increasingly interested in sexual reproductive health and rights and understand, now more than ever, the importance of sexual health knowledge”, said Ms. Rosa Ayong, moderator of the panel discussion and a youth member of the IPPF Global Board of Trustees. The virtual round table panelists included Mr. Kassoum Coulibaly, President of the Global Institute for Women’s Empowerment Group, who spoke about the role of young people in promoting an inclusive food system. ‘’The International Youth Day, is a moment to evaluate our progress, empower young girls and boys, and strengthen their leadership role in the world's transformation with a gender equality vision," said Mr. Coulibaly. Panelists also included Ms. Chantal Umuhoza, who addressed the intersectional aspects of food systems in the context of gender and age, and Mr. Joshua Atabinore Akharigeya, who highlighted the impact of sexual reproductive health and rights on the food value chain from production to marketing. “Discussing Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights within the context of food value chain is ever critical. A healthy community ensures productivity and success across the food value chain, and in return, individuals and communities are economically empowered to access quality sexual reproductive health and rights services, seek justice and reduce their vulnerabilities - especially for girls and women - against sexual and gender-based violence”, said Mr. Akharigeya. Keynote speaker and Deputy Director of the UN World Food Program African Union Global Office, Ms. Magdalena Moshi, said that “actions should be taken by all stakeholders, to promote and advocate for the consumption of wholesome, nutrient dense foods for the realisation of sexual reproductive health, particularly for the female youth, as consumers". The discussions enabled youth participants to learn about their role in promoting an inclusive food system by advocating for sexual health rights through regional advocacy policies and frameworks. Giving youth a voice is a prerequisite for Africa’s transformation. Expanding opportunities for youth, women, and girls is an obligation that is essential in realizing everyone’s right to food security, nutrition, and sexual reproductive health. END Media Contacts: -Mahmoud Garga, Lead Specialist - Strategic Communication, Media Relations and Digital Campaigning, IPPF Africa Regional Office (IPPFARO) – email: [email protected] -Phone +254 704 626 920 Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Office, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) - Email: [email protected] – Phone: +254 707 952 990   ABOUT IPPF AFRICA REGION (IPPFAR) The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organization in Africa, and the leading sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy voice in the region. Headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, the overarching goal of IPPFAR is to increase access to SRHR services to the most vulnerable youth, men and women in sub-Saharan Africa. Supported by thousands of volunteers, IPPFAR tackles the continent’s growing SRHR challenges through a network of Member Associations (MAs) in 39 countries. We do this by developing our MAs into efficient entities with the capacity to deliver and sustain high quality, youth focused and gender sensitive services. We work with governments, the African Union, Regional Economic Commissions, the Pan-African Parliament, United Nations bodies among others to expand political and financial commitments to sexual and reproductive health and rights in Africa. Learn more about us on our website. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

World Population Day
news item

| 11 July 2021

World Population Day 2021: Increasing Effective Strategies for SRHR Information and Services (Focus on Malawi)

Sunday, 11 July 2021. As we commemorate the World Population Day with a projected 7.9 billion people on the planet today, our thoughts also turn to what were the reproductive needs and wants of women and girls in Africa during this extraordinary year and whether were they fulfilled. The COVID-19 pandemic has had devastating effects on the provision of health care services, including sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services, often more so in countries in Africa that are already struggling to keep up with normal preventative and curative services, let alone COVID-19 related morbidity and mortality. While fertility rates across the globe are shifting in both directions, and with Africa accounting for the top 23 highest total fertility rates (TFR)[1] in the world, the IPPF Women’s Integrated Sexual Health project (WISH2) provides SRH care to women, men and young people in 15 countries across the world - 12 of them being in Africa, including in fragile and conflict affected countries. The WISH2 program offers quality integrated and inclusive family planning and SRH services to marginalized and hard to reach populations: the poor, youth under 20 years and people living with disability. Within this framework, the WISH2 project recognized that many of these countries’ health services have been devastatingly affected by waves of the pandemic and adapted SRH services to ensure, wherever possible, continued access to SRH care to support women to achieve their reproductive intentions during the pandemic. In Malawi, we can focus in on young people against the backdrop of COVID-19 and a health system struggling to cope. Youth in Malawi face a myriad of challenges such as early marriages, unintended pregnancies, unsafe abortions, high new HIV infections, early childbearing, drug and alcohol abuse, high illiteracy rate, poverty, and HIV and AIDS pandemic. (NSRHR Policy 2017–2022). While young people make up the largest and fastest growing proportion of population in Malawi with 51% of the population below 18 years, access to SRH care remains low among Malawian youth with 41% of adolescent women aged 15–19 having an unmet need for modern contraception. As the world celebrates population day, the Family Planning Association of Malawi (FPAM), which is IPPF's Member Association in the country, has increased effective strategies for providing access to information and SRH care to youth, including persons living with disabilities throughout the pandemic in the country. Some of these strategies include; Training of youth leaders to conduct peer learning programs and training of health care providers in Youth friendly services.  Establishing youth friendly spaces at service delivery points.   Conducting awareness creation and demand for SRH services to youth including conducting dialogue sessions, and engaging on WhatsApp and other social media platforms like Facebook.  Sensitizing parents and guardians to create an enabling environment for youth to access SRH services.  Coordinating with the Malawi Council for people with disabilities (MACOHA) - a government agency - to increase access to SRHR for persons with disabilities. Community Reproductive Health Promoters sensitization on engaging with young people with disabilities in the community.  Use of the growing mobile phone market in Malawi as a new avenue for reaching young clients by working with a local mobile service operator to promote SRHR messaging on the 3-2-1 platform (a free to use mobile subscription app). These strategies can be found in full here. “Our work complements Government efforts. Through the WISH project and other projects, FPAM has been able to reach out to young women particularly in the hard-to-reach areas with SRH information and services which otherwise could not be available if FPAM was not present in those areas”, said Donald Makwakwa, Executive Director at the Family Planning Association of Malawi. In this coming year, despite reduced funding, the project will aim to continue maintaining its innovative adaptations to support access to quality SRH services and rights for women and men living in the most difficult of circumstances. Joyce Ayong, IPPF Board of Trustee member and President of the Youth Action Movement (YAM) at the Cameroon National Planning Association for Family Welfare (CAMNAFAW) highlighted the importance of youth outreach and inclusion especially in the most difficult of circumstances. “We campaign for the cause of young people so that they are taken into account. Young persons with disabilities and youth living in hard to reach areas also need to access SRH care and information and it is our duty to continue to find ways to provide these lifesaving services to them”, said Ayong. The WISH2 program will continue to find adaptive strategies ensuring that the much-needed SRH care in some of the hardest hit countries by the pandemic is delivered to the most marginalized, leaving no one behind when it comes to family planning needs. About the Women’s Integrated Sexual Health Project 2 The Women’s Integrated Sexual Health (WISH) programme offers quality integrated and inclusive family planning and sexual and reproductive health services to marginalized and hard to reach populations: the poor, youth under 20 years and people living with disability. WISH is the UK Government’s flagship programme to support integrated sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) services in a range of countries across Africa and Asia by 2021. The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) manages the WISH programme through a consortium arrangement (Lot 2) with 10 IPPF Member Associations and hand - picked partners chosen for their expertise to maximise access and reach for people in 15 countries: Development Media International (DMI), Humanity and Inclusion UK (HI), International Rescue Committee (IRC), Marie Stopes International (MSI), and Options Consultancy Services (Options). The countries are: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burundi, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Pakistan, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe. For more updates on our work, follow IPPF Africa Region on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.   [1] Total Fertility Rate 2021 (worldpopulationreview.com)  

World Population Day
news_item

| 11 July 2021

World Population Day 2021: Increasing Effective Strategies for SRHR Information and Services (Focus on Malawi)

Sunday, 11 July 2021. As we commemorate the World Population Day with a projected 7.9 billion people on the planet today, our thoughts also turn to what were the reproductive needs and wants of women and girls in Africa during this extraordinary year and whether were they fulfilled. The COVID-19 pandemic has had devastating effects on the provision of health care services, including sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services, often more so in countries in Africa that are already struggling to keep up with normal preventative and curative services, let alone COVID-19 related morbidity and mortality. While fertility rates across the globe are shifting in both directions, and with Africa accounting for the top 23 highest total fertility rates (TFR)[1] in the world, the IPPF Women’s Integrated Sexual Health project (WISH2) provides SRH care to women, men and young people in 15 countries across the world - 12 of them being in Africa, including in fragile and conflict affected countries. The WISH2 program offers quality integrated and inclusive family planning and SRH services to marginalized and hard to reach populations: the poor, youth under 20 years and people living with disability. Within this framework, the WISH2 project recognized that many of these countries’ health services have been devastatingly affected by waves of the pandemic and adapted SRH services to ensure, wherever possible, continued access to SRH care to support women to achieve their reproductive intentions during the pandemic. In Malawi, we can focus in on young people against the backdrop of COVID-19 and a health system struggling to cope. Youth in Malawi face a myriad of challenges such as early marriages, unintended pregnancies, unsafe abortions, high new HIV infections, early childbearing, drug and alcohol abuse, high illiteracy rate, poverty, and HIV and AIDS pandemic. (NSRHR Policy 2017–2022). While young people make up the largest and fastest growing proportion of population in Malawi with 51% of the population below 18 years, access to SRH care remains low among Malawian youth with 41% of adolescent women aged 15–19 having an unmet need for modern contraception. As the world celebrates population day, the Family Planning Association of Malawi (FPAM), which is IPPF's Member Association in the country, has increased effective strategies for providing access to information and SRH care to youth, including persons living with disabilities throughout the pandemic in the country. Some of these strategies include; Training of youth leaders to conduct peer learning programs and training of health care providers in Youth friendly services.  Establishing youth friendly spaces at service delivery points.   Conducting awareness creation and demand for SRH services to youth including conducting dialogue sessions, and engaging on WhatsApp and other social media platforms like Facebook.  Sensitizing parents and guardians to create an enabling environment for youth to access SRH services.  Coordinating with the Malawi Council for people with disabilities (MACOHA) - a government agency - to increase access to SRHR for persons with disabilities. Community Reproductive Health Promoters sensitization on engaging with young people with disabilities in the community.  Use of the growing mobile phone market in Malawi as a new avenue for reaching young clients by working with a local mobile service operator to promote SRHR messaging on the 3-2-1 platform (a free to use mobile subscription app). These strategies can be found in full here. “Our work complements Government efforts. Through the WISH project and other projects, FPAM has been able to reach out to young women particularly in the hard-to-reach areas with SRH information and services which otherwise could not be available if FPAM was not present in those areas”, said Donald Makwakwa, Executive Director at the Family Planning Association of Malawi. In this coming year, despite reduced funding, the project will aim to continue maintaining its innovative adaptations to support access to quality SRH services and rights for women and men living in the most difficult of circumstances. Joyce Ayong, IPPF Board of Trustee member and President of the Youth Action Movement (YAM) at the Cameroon National Planning Association for Family Welfare (CAMNAFAW) highlighted the importance of youth outreach and inclusion especially in the most difficult of circumstances. “We campaign for the cause of young people so that they are taken into account. Young persons with disabilities and youth living in hard to reach areas also need to access SRH care and information and it is our duty to continue to find ways to provide these lifesaving services to them”, said Ayong. The WISH2 program will continue to find adaptive strategies ensuring that the much-needed SRH care in some of the hardest hit countries by the pandemic is delivered to the most marginalized, leaving no one behind when it comes to family planning needs. About the Women’s Integrated Sexual Health Project 2 The Women’s Integrated Sexual Health (WISH) programme offers quality integrated and inclusive family planning and sexual and reproductive health services to marginalized and hard to reach populations: the poor, youth under 20 years and people living with disability. WISH is the UK Government’s flagship programme to support integrated sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) services in a range of countries across Africa and Asia by 2021. The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) manages the WISH programme through a consortium arrangement (Lot 2) with 10 IPPF Member Associations and hand - picked partners chosen for their expertise to maximise access and reach for people in 15 countries: Development Media International (DMI), Humanity and Inclusion UK (HI), International Rescue Committee (IRC), Marie Stopes International (MSI), and Options Consultancy Services (Options). The countries are: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burundi, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Pakistan, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe. For more updates on our work, follow IPPF Africa Region on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.   [1] Total Fertility Rate 2021 (worldpopulationreview.com)  

Generation Equality Forum
news item

| 06 July 2021

IPPF announces new commitments to Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) at the Generation Equality Forum

The Generation Equality Forum (GEF) is a global multi-stakeholder platform to reignite the worldwide commitment for gender equality, convened by UN Women and the governments of Mexico and France. The Forum kicked off in Mexico City, Mexico, on 29 – 31 March 2021, and culminated in Paris, France, on 30 June – 2 July 2021, with the aim of securing a set of concrete, ambitious, and transformative commitments to achieve irreversible progress towards gender equality; bringing together governments, civil society organizations, young people-led organizations, the private sector and foundations to define and announce ambitious investments and policies on a range of priority areas, from climate change to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), gender-based violence, feminist movements, technology and economic justice.   IPPF is proud to be one of the co-leads of the Action Coalition on Bodily Autonomy & SRHR, which aims to:  Expand access to comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) in and out of school  Increase qualitative access to contraception  Empower all people, including adolescents and women, in all their diversity to make autonomous choices about their bodies, sexuality and reproduction  Strengthen girls, women’s and feminist organizations and networks to promote and protect bodily autonomy and SRHR.  IPPF has joined the two collective commitments of this Action Coalition on abortion and CSE.  IPPF’s individual commitment at GEF  By 2026, IPPF commits to work to accelerate universal access to safe abortion care centered on three principles – rights-based, reproductive justice and gender transformative – with a focus on the following strategies:   Expand and improve the provision of abortion care through 102 Member Associations, including quality medical and surgical abortion, person-centered abortion self-care support, and abortion care beyond 12 weeks of gestation through a simplified outpatient model using task-shifting to mid-level providers, including self-managed medical abortion.   Fully integrate abortion care into humanitarian preparedness and response as full realization of SRHR, with all IPPF emergency responses providing abortion care as a standard part of the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP).  Advocate for the decriminalization of abortion and the removal of coercive policies and legislation on abortion in 25 countries, and advocate to donor governments and agencies to remove restrictions preventing work and dialogue on abortion, including the permanent repeal of the Global Gag Rule.  IPPF is also pleased to announce that it will be working with the Governments of Canada, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden and the Netherlands to help realize universal access to sexual and reproductive health and rights and CSE.   IPPF’s Director-General, Dr Alvaro Bermejo, said:  “Since Beijing, progress has been made towards gender equality, yet not a single country can claim to have achieved it. It’s simple; women and girls cannot wait any longer to live a life free from discrimination, free from gender-based violence and free from harmful patriarchal gender norms – we must replace rhetoric with meaningful action. "As co-leaders of the Action Coalition on Bodily Autonomy and SRHR, we are convinced that you cannot achieve gender equality without SRHR, and urge that it be at the center of policies and decision-making processes. IPPF, alongside its partners and Member Associations, will turn our commitments into meaningful action that accelerates our shared goal of achieving gender equality.”  IPPF’s Global Advocacy Director, Anamaria Bejar, added:  “Women and girls cannot afford more broken promises. Now is the time to renew our determination to make the Beijing Platform for Action a reality for every woman and girl in the world, to live with dignity and reach their full potential. That is why IPPF wholeheartedly support the Generation Equality Forum and what it stands for. Together, we can meaningfully work towards gender equality in our lifetime.”  Fore more details about IPPF's commitments at GEF, click here. Follow IPPF Africa Region on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

Generation Equality Forum
news_item

| 06 July 2021

IPPF announces new commitments to Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) at the Generation Equality Forum

The Generation Equality Forum (GEF) is a global multi-stakeholder platform to reignite the worldwide commitment for gender equality, convened by UN Women and the governments of Mexico and France. The Forum kicked off in Mexico City, Mexico, on 29 – 31 March 2021, and culminated in Paris, France, on 30 June – 2 July 2021, with the aim of securing a set of concrete, ambitious, and transformative commitments to achieve irreversible progress towards gender equality; bringing together governments, civil society organizations, young people-led organizations, the private sector and foundations to define and announce ambitious investments and policies on a range of priority areas, from climate change to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), gender-based violence, feminist movements, technology and economic justice.   IPPF is proud to be one of the co-leads of the Action Coalition on Bodily Autonomy & SRHR, which aims to:  Expand access to comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) in and out of school  Increase qualitative access to contraception  Empower all people, including adolescents and women, in all their diversity to make autonomous choices about their bodies, sexuality and reproduction  Strengthen girls, women’s and feminist organizations and networks to promote and protect bodily autonomy and SRHR.  IPPF has joined the two collective commitments of this Action Coalition on abortion and CSE.  IPPF’s individual commitment at GEF  By 2026, IPPF commits to work to accelerate universal access to safe abortion care centered on three principles – rights-based, reproductive justice and gender transformative – with a focus on the following strategies:   Expand and improve the provision of abortion care through 102 Member Associations, including quality medical and surgical abortion, person-centered abortion self-care support, and abortion care beyond 12 weeks of gestation through a simplified outpatient model using task-shifting to mid-level providers, including self-managed medical abortion.   Fully integrate abortion care into humanitarian preparedness and response as full realization of SRHR, with all IPPF emergency responses providing abortion care as a standard part of the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP).  Advocate for the decriminalization of abortion and the removal of coercive policies and legislation on abortion in 25 countries, and advocate to donor governments and agencies to remove restrictions preventing work and dialogue on abortion, including the permanent repeal of the Global Gag Rule.  IPPF is also pleased to announce that it will be working with the Governments of Canada, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden and the Netherlands to help realize universal access to sexual and reproductive health and rights and CSE.   IPPF’s Director-General, Dr Alvaro Bermejo, said:  “Since Beijing, progress has been made towards gender equality, yet not a single country can claim to have achieved it. It’s simple; women and girls cannot wait any longer to live a life free from discrimination, free from gender-based violence and free from harmful patriarchal gender norms – we must replace rhetoric with meaningful action. "As co-leaders of the Action Coalition on Bodily Autonomy and SRHR, we are convinced that you cannot achieve gender equality without SRHR, and urge that it be at the center of policies and decision-making processes. IPPF, alongside its partners and Member Associations, will turn our commitments into meaningful action that accelerates our shared goal of achieving gender equality.”  IPPF’s Global Advocacy Director, Anamaria Bejar, added:  “Women and girls cannot afford more broken promises. Now is the time to renew our determination to make the Beijing Platform for Action a reality for every woman and girl in the world, to live with dignity and reach their full potential. That is why IPPF wholeheartedly support the Generation Equality Forum and what it stands for. Together, we can meaningfully work towards gender equality in our lifetime.”  Fore more details about IPPF's commitments at GEF, click here. Follow IPPF Africa Region on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

MSF International Activity Report Illustration image
news item

| 29 June 2021

The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region is utterly shocked at the killing of three MSF staff members in Tigray, Ethiopia

Nairobi, 28 June 2021 - The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) joins Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) and the entire humanitarian community in strongly condemning the killing of three MSF humanitarian workers in Tigray, Ethiopia. IPPFAR is deeply shocked and horrified after receiving confirmation of the murder of Maria Hernandez, Yohannes Halefom Reda and Tedros Gebremariam Gebremichael on 25 June 2021 in Tigray. “The murder of humanitarian workers is an unacceptable and heinous violation of International Humanitarian Law. No words can convey the shock and outrage resulting from these appalling acts, and the perpetrators must be found and held accountable”, said Alvaro Bermejo, IPPF Director General. “Humanitarian and health workers must never be targeted, and security forces have an obligation to protect and respect our colleagues delivering services in conflict areas and elsewhere”, added Bermejo. IPPFAR stands in solidarity with the entire humanitarian community in conveying its deepest condolences to the family, friends and colleagues of the victims. END   Media Contacts: -Mahmoud Garga, Lead Specialist - Strategic Communication, Media Relations and Digital Campaigning, IPPF Africa Regional Office (IPPFARO) – email: [email protected] -Phone +254 704 626 920 Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Officer, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) - Email: [email protected] 

MSF International Activity Report Illustration image
news_item

| 29 June 2021

The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region is utterly shocked at the killing of three MSF staff members in Tigray, Ethiopia

Nairobi, 28 June 2021 - The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) joins Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) and the entire humanitarian community in strongly condemning the killing of three MSF humanitarian workers in Tigray, Ethiopia. IPPFAR is deeply shocked and horrified after receiving confirmation of the murder of Maria Hernandez, Yohannes Halefom Reda and Tedros Gebremariam Gebremichael on 25 June 2021 in Tigray. “The murder of humanitarian workers is an unacceptable and heinous violation of International Humanitarian Law. No words can convey the shock and outrage resulting from these appalling acts, and the perpetrators must be found and held accountable”, said Alvaro Bermejo, IPPF Director General. “Humanitarian and health workers must never be targeted, and security forces have an obligation to protect and respect our colleagues delivering services in conflict areas and elsewhere”, added Bermejo. IPPFAR stands in solidarity with the entire humanitarian community in conveying its deepest condolences to the family, friends and colleagues of the victims. END   Media Contacts: -Mahmoud Garga, Lead Specialist - Strategic Communication, Media Relations and Digital Campaigning, IPPF Africa Regional Office (IPPFARO) – email: [email protected] -Phone +254 704 626 920 Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Officer, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) - Email: [email protected] 

Adapting family planning services in time of crisis introduction
news item

| 28 June 2021

Adapting family planning services in time of crisis: Innovations by the IPPF Africa Region Member Associations

  On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. The impact of the pandemic would be felt across the world in all sectors, including health, where major disruptions were witnessed. Access to basic health information and services, including sexual reproductive health (SRH) information and services became constrained owing to various government-led protective directives such as restrictions on movement, lockdowns and curfews. The pandemic also put a strain on IPPF Member Associations (MAs) across the world. MAs are IPPF affiliated locally owned health organizations which provide a wide range of sexual reproductive health information and services. The pandemic saw many MAs cut down on their services, with some having to shut down completely or suspend some of their operations in their static clinics, community-based outlets and mobile outreach services. Surveys conducted by the IPPF Africa Region in April and June 2020 to establish the impact of Covid 19 on its MAs established that a total of 1,405 service delivery points (SDPs) were reported to have been closed during round 1 of the survey while 2,161 SDPs were closed during round 2 out of the 13,049 service delivery points reported in 2019. 447 mobile clinics were also shut down. These disruptions affected people’s access to the essential sexual reproductive healthcare services provided in our MA facilities, such as family planning services, sexually transmitted infections services, maternal and child health services, among others. Young people were no longer able to congregate at the youth-friendly centers where they would access SRH information and services. This called for innovation on the part of IPPF in ensuring that the populations, especially the vulnerable and marginalized, continued accessing SRH services. Various partners came on board to mitigate the gap occasioned by COVID-19 by providing various resources for this, including financial resources. These donors included Global Affairs Canada (GAC), Levi Strauss Foundation and Danida. The Danida grant for COVID-19 was disbursed to 45 IPPF MAs in the Africa region and was geared towards filling the gap created by the pandemic by ensuring there was continued SRH service delivery despite the challenges. The interventions facilitated by these grants have yielded commendable results, as more than 100 million SRH services were reported in the Africa Region - mostly women, girls, the vulnerable and hard-to-reach populations have been able to access SRH information and services. The range of services, offered by the MAs in partnership with government agencies and development partners in the private sector, included ante-natal and post-natal care, childbirth services, family planning services, STI treatment and management services, Comprehensive Sexuality Education (CSE) for the young people, Sexual and Gender-Based Violence (SGBV) services. In a series of five case studies, we highlight some innovations and adaptations developed by IPPF Africa Region MAs, that enabled thousands of their target populations to continue accessing quality and affordable sexual reproductive health and rights (SRHR) information and services amidst the pandemic. Cameroun: Adopting a Home-based Service Delivery Approach Nigeria: Establishing Digital Health Interventions Zambia: Training Women on Self-Managed Care for Contraception Benin: Bringing Comprehensive Sexuality Education Online Sao Tome: A Clinic on Wheels 

Adapting family planning services in time of crisis introduction
news_item

| 28 June 2021

Adapting family planning services in time of crisis: Innovations by the IPPF Africa Region Member Associations

  On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. The impact of the pandemic would be felt across the world in all sectors, including health, where major disruptions were witnessed. Access to basic health information and services, including sexual reproductive health (SRH) information and services became constrained owing to various government-led protective directives such as restrictions on movement, lockdowns and curfews. The pandemic also put a strain on IPPF Member Associations (MAs) across the world. MAs are IPPF affiliated locally owned health organizations which provide a wide range of sexual reproductive health information and services. The pandemic saw many MAs cut down on their services, with some having to shut down completely or suspend some of their operations in their static clinics, community-based outlets and mobile outreach services. Surveys conducted by the IPPF Africa Region in April and June 2020 to establish the impact of Covid 19 on its MAs established that a total of 1,405 service delivery points (SDPs) were reported to have been closed during round 1 of the survey while 2,161 SDPs were closed during round 2 out of the 13,049 service delivery points reported in 2019. 447 mobile clinics were also shut down. These disruptions affected people’s access to the essential sexual reproductive healthcare services provided in our MA facilities, such as family planning services, sexually transmitted infections services, maternal and child health services, among others. Young people were no longer able to congregate at the youth-friendly centers where they would access SRH information and services. This called for innovation on the part of IPPF in ensuring that the populations, especially the vulnerable and marginalized, continued accessing SRH services. Various partners came on board to mitigate the gap occasioned by COVID-19 by providing various resources for this, including financial resources. These donors included Global Affairs Canada (GAC), Levi Strauss Foundation and Danida. The Danida grant for COVID-19 was disbursed to 45 IPPF MAs in the Africa region and was geared towards filling the gap created by the pandemic by ensuring there was continued SRH service delivery despite the challenges. The interventions facilitated by these grants have yielded commendable results, as more than 100 million SRH services were reported in the Africa Region - mostly women, girls, the vulnerable and hard-to-reach populations have been able to access SRH information and services. The range of services, offered by the MAs in partnership with government agencies and development partners in the private sector, included ante-natal and post-natal care, childbirth services, family planning services, STI treatment and management services, Comprehensive Sexuality Education (CSE) for the young people, Sexual and Gender-Based Violence (SGBV) services. In a series of five case studies, we highlight some innovations and adaptations developed by IPPF Africa Region MAs, that enabled thousands of their target populations to continue accessing quality and affordable sexual reproductive health and rights (SRHR) information and services amidst the pandemic. Cameroun: Adopting a Home-based Service Delivery Approach Nigeria: Establishing Digital Health Interventions Zambia: Training Women on Self-Managed Care for Contraception Benin: Bringing Comprehensive Sexuality Education Online Sao Tome: A Clinic on Wheels 

IPPF regional and youth forums
news item

| 26 June 2021

The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region holds its first Youth and Regional Forums

Nairobi, 25 June 2021 - The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) held its first ever Youth Forum and Regional Forum from 22 to 25 June 2021. The forums, which took place virtually, were attended by over 120 participants drawn from 39 countries across the region. Participants included representatives from the Youth Action Movement (YAM) - the youth arm of IPPF Africa Region's volunteer body based within the Member Associations (MAs) -, Executive Directors from MAs in the Africa Region, MA Board Presidents, the IPPF Director General, the IPPF Board of Trustees, and the Africa Regional Secretariat staff. The Youth Forum and the Regional Forum, which are the first-ever forums to be held within the Federation in line with the new IPPF governance reforms of November 2019, were aimed at fostering collaboration, sharing experiences, successes, challenges and best practices among IPPFAR’s MAs. In November 2019, IPPF overhauled its governance and resource allocation system to address concerns of its MAs, donors and other stakeholders. The reforms resulted in the adoption of an MA-centric approach aimed at strengthening MAs and making them more efficient, effective, and accountable. In his keynote speech, the IPPF Director General, Dr. Alvaro Bermejo, noted the resilience that MAs had demonstrated in delivering on their core mandate; that of providing quality sexual reproductive health (SRH) services to poor and vulnerable populations in sub-Saharan Africa. “The unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic placed tremendous strain on healthcare systems globally, and I commend our Member Associations for their continued efforts to offer much-needed SRH services to those who need them”, said Bermejo. In 2020, MAs in the Africa region provided a total number of 105,429,716 sexual reproductive health services. These included 56,670,238 family planning services, 1,783,523 safe abortion services and 1,939,051 Gender-Based Violence (GBV) services. Women received 89% of the services provided, while young people accounted for 55% of the total SRH services provided. Notably, and despite the challenging COVID-19 circumstances, the Africa Region provided 14,6 million couple-year protection (CYP) - its highest volume ever achieved – which is the  estimated protection provided by contraceptive methods, based upon the volume of all contraceptives sold or distributed free of charge to clients during the year[1]. In light of the rapidly changing political and financial context in which MAs have had to and must continue to deliver lifesaving services, some of the successful adaptive strategies they have implemented included innovations in health service delivery such as home-based service delivery in Cameroon, self-managed contraception care in Zambia, and the adoption of Digital Health Strategies in the form of online Comprehensive Sexuality Education in Benin, or the use of different social media platforms for SRH information and services in Nigeria.  With young people at the heart of IPPF’s work, the IPPF Africa Regional Director Marie-Evelyne Pétrus-Barry emphasized the role of this invaluable group. “In our organization, we have embraced young people as partners, and they are at the core of our global strategy and business plan. We highly value youth involvement across all areas of our work, including in our governance structures. We benefit from their ideas and contributions, with many of our achievements being significantly contributed by them,” she said in a speech delivered on her behalf by Mr. Sam Ntelamo, the Acting Regional Director. Young people attending the forum also lauded IPPFAR for their inclusion in its operations. “There is nothing about us without us, and as young people, IPPFAR continues to exemplify this. Through the MAs, the organization has provided us with safe spaces to discuss our issues and youth-friendly clinics where we comfortably seek sensitive services in a comfortable manner. We are also involved in making programme decisions and implementing them. As young people, we feel appreciated,” said Marian Pleasant Kargbo, YAM President in Sierra Leone. The first-ever IPPFAR Youth and Regional forums presented a great opportunity for all participants to collectively discuss and learn about how to diversify their funding base while strengthening their networks and partnerships across all levels for the benefit of the people we serve.   Media Contacts: - Mahmoud Garga, Lead Specialist - Strategic Communication, Media Relations and Digital Campaigning, IPPF Africa Regional Office (IPPFARO) – email: [email protected] -Phone +254 704 626 920 - Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Officer, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) - Email: [email protected]  ABOUT IPPF AFRICA REGION (IPPFAR) The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organization in Africa, and the leading sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy voice in the region. Headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, the overarching goal of IPPFAR is to increase access to SRHR services to the most vulnerable youth, men and women in sub-Saharan Africa. Supported by thousands of volunteers, IPPFAR tackles the continent’s growing SRHR challenges through a network of Member Associations (MAs) in 39 countries. We do this by developing our MAs into efficient entities with the capacity to deliver and sustain high-quality, youth-focused and gender-sensitive services. We work with governments, the African Union, Regional Economic Commissions, the Pan-African Parliament, United Nations bodies among others to expand political and financial commitments to sexual and reproductive health and rights in Africa. Learn more about us on our website. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.   [1] The CYP is calculated by multiplying the quantity of each method distributed to clients by a conversion factor, to yield an estimate of the duration of contraceptive protection provided per unit of that method. The CYP for each method is then summed for all methods to obtain a total CYP figure. CYP conversion factors are based on how a method is used, failure rates, wastage, and how many units of the method are typically needed to provide one year of contraceptive protection for a couple. The calculation takes into account that some methods, like condoms and oral contraceptives, for example, maybe used incorrectly and then discarded, or that IUDs and implants may be removed before their life span is realized. The term "CYP" reflects distribution and is a way to estimate coverage and not actual use or impact. The CYP calculation provides an immediate indication of the volume of program activity.  

IPPF regional and youth forums
news_item

| 26 June 2021

The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region holds its first Youth and Regional Forums

Nairobi, 25 June 2021 - The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) held its first ever Youth Forum and Regional Forum from 22 to 25 June 2021. The forums, which took place virtually, were attended by over 120 participants drawn from 39 countries across the region. Participants included representatives from the Youth Action Movement (YAM) - the youth arm of IPPF Africa Region's volunteer body based within the Member Associations (MAs) -, Executive Directors from MAs in the Africa Region, MA Board Presidents, the IPPF Director General, the IPPF Board of Trustees, and the Africa Regional Secretariat staff. The Youth Forum and the Regional Forum, which are the first-ever forums to be held within the Federation in line with the new IPPF governance reforms of November 2019, were aimed at fostering collaboration, sharing experiences, successes, challenges and best practices among IPPFAR’s MAs. In November 2019, IPPF overhauled its governance and resource allocation system to address concerns of its MAs, donors and other stakeholders. The reforms resulted in the adoption of an MA-centric approach aimed at strengthening MAs and making them more efficient, effective, and accountable. In his keynote speech, the IPPF Director General, Dr. Alvaro Bermejo, noted the resilience that MAs had demonstrated in delivering on their core mandate; that of providing quality sexual reproductive health (SRH) services to poor and vulnerable populations in sub-Saharan Africa. “The unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic placed tremendous strain on healthcare systems globally, and I commend our Member Associations for their continued efforts to offer much-needed SRH services to those who need them”, said Bermejo. In 2020, MAs in the Africa region provided a total number of 105,429,716 sexual reproductive health services. These included 56,670,238 family planning services, 1,783,523 safe abortion services and 1,939,051 Gender-Based Violence (GBV) services. Women received 89% of the services provided, while young people accounted for 55% of the total SRH services provided. Notably, and despite the challenging COVID-19 circumstances, the Africa Region provided 14,6 million couple-year protection (CYP) - its highest volume ever achieved – which is the  estimated protection provided by contraceptive methods, based upon the volume of all contraceptives sold or distributed free of charge to clients during the year[1]. In light of the rapidly changing political and financial context in which MAs have had to and must continue to deliver lifesaving services, some of the successful adaptive strategies they have implemented included innovations in health service delivery such as home-based service delivery in Cameroon, self-managed contraception care in Zambia, and the adoption of Digital Health Strategies in the form of online Comprehensive Sexuality Education in Benin, or the use of different social media platforms for SRH information and services in Nigeria.  With young people at the heart of IPPF’s work, the IPPF Africa Regional Director Marie-Evelyne Pétrus-Barry emphasized the role of this invaluable group. “In our organization, we have embraced young people as partners, and they are at the core of our global strategy and business plan. We highly value youth involvement across all areas of our work, including in our governance structures. We benefit from their ideas and contributions, with many of our achievements being significantly contributed by them,” she said in a speech delivered on her behalf by Mr. Sam Ntelamo, the Acting Regional Director. Young people attending the forum also lauded IPPFAR for their inclusion in its operations. “There is nothing about us without us, and as young people, IPPFAR continues to exemplify this. Through the MAs, the organization has provided us with safe spaces to discuss our issues and youth-friendly clinics where we comfortably seek sensitive services in a comfortable manner. We are also involved in making programme decisions and implementing them. As young people, we feel appreciated,” said Marian Pleasant Kargbo, YAM President in Sierra Leone. The first-ever IPPFAR Youth and Regional forums presented a great opportunity for all participants to collectively discuss and learn about how to diversify their funding base while strengthening their networks and partnerships across all levels for the benefit of the people we serve.   Media Contacts: - Mahmoud Garga, Lead Specialist - Strategic Communication, Media Relations and Digital Campaigning, IPPF Africa Regional Office (IPPFARO) – email: [email protected] -Phone +254 704 626 920 - Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Officer, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) - Email: [email protected]  ABOUT IPPF AFRICA REGION (IPPFAR) The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organization in Africa, and the leading sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy voice in the region. Headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, the overarching goal of IPPFAR is to increase access to SRHR services to the most vulnerable youth, men and women in sub-Saharan Africa. Supported by thousands of volunteers, IPPFAR tackles the continent’s growing SRHR challenges through a network of Member Associations (MAs) in 39 countries. We do this by developing our MAs into efficient entities with the capacity to deliver and sustain high-quality, youth-focused and gender-sensitive services. We work with governments, the African Union, Regional Economic Commissions, the Pan-African Parliament, United Nations bodies among others to expand political and financial commitments to sexual and reproductive health and rights in Africa. Learn more about us on our website. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.   [1] The CYP is calculated by multiplying the quantity of each method distributed to clients by a conversion factor, to yield an estimate of the duration of contraceptive protection provided per unit of that method. The CYP for each method is then summed for all methods to obtain a total CYP figure. CYP conversion factors are based on how a method is used, failure rates, wastage, and how many units of the method are typically needed to provide one year of contraceptive protection for a couple. The calculation takes into account that some methods, like condoms and oral contraceptives, for example, maybe used incorrectly and then discarded, or that IUDs and implants may be removed before their life span is realized. The term "CYP" reflects distribution and is a way to estimate coverage and not actual use or impact. The CYP calculation provides an immediate indication of the volume of program activity.  

International Youth Day
news item

| 12 August 2021

IPPFAR Celebrates International Youth Day 2021: “Transforming Food Systems: Youth Innovation for Human and Planetary Health”

Addis Ababa, 12 August 2021 – In commemoration of the International Youth Day, The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region, through its Sub-Office to the African Union and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa hosted a virtual panel discussion on Youth, Gender Equality and Sexual Reproductive Health Rights in Transforming African Food Systems on 12 August 2021. The virtual panel discussion focused on the role of youth in advocacy towards gender equality and sustainable healthy food systems. The event also aimed at sharing recommendations to support young people's meaningful engagement in advocacy on inclusive food systems for the realization of sexual reproductive health rights on the African continent. Africa has the youngest population in the world with more than 400 million people between the ages of 15 and 35 years, which requires increased investment in economic and social development factors to improve the Development Index of its countries.   This year’s International Youth Day, celebrated under the theme: “Transforming Food Systems: Youth Innovation for Human and Planetary Health”, offers an opportunity to reflect on the interlinkages between sexual reproductive health and rights and nutrition, and on the intersectional aspects of food systems in the context of gender. “The International Youth Day helps bring attention to our issues. Young people are increasingly interested in sexual reproductive health and rights and understand, now more than ever, the importance of sexual health knowledge”, said Ms. Rosa Ayong, moderator of the panel discussion and a youth member of the IPPF Global Board of Trustees. The virtual round table panelists included Mr. Kassoum Coulibaly, President of the Global Institute for Women’s Empowerment Group, who spoke about the role of young people in promoting an inclusive food system. ‘’The International Youth Day, is a moment to evaluate our progress, empower young girls and boys, and strengthen their leadership role in the world's transformation with a gender equality vision," said Mr. Coulibaly. Panelists also included Ms. Chantal Umuhoza, who addressed the intersectional aspects of food systems in the context of gender and age, and Mr. Joshua Atabinore Akharigeya, who highlighted the impact of sexual reproductive health and rights on the food value chain from production to marketing. “Discussing Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights within the context of food value chain is ever critical. A healthy community ensures productivity and success across the food value chain, and in return, individuals and communities are economically empowered to access quality sexual reproductive health and rights services, seek justice and reduce their vulnerabilities - especially for girls and women - against sexual and gender-based violence”, said Mr. Akharigeya. Keynote speaker and Deputy Director of the UN World Food Program African Union Global Office, Ms. Magdalena Moshi, said that “actions should be taken by all stakeholders, to promote and advocate for the consumption of wholesome, nutrient dense foods for the realisation of sexual reproductive health, particularly for the female youth, as consumers". The discussions enabled youth participants to learn about their role in promoting an inclusive food system by advocating for sexual health rights through regional advocacy policies and frameworks. Giving youth a voice is a prerequisite for Africa’s transformation. Expanding opportunities for youth, women, and girls is an obligation that is essential in realizing everyone’s right to food security, nutrition, and sexual reproductive health. END Media Contacts: -Mahmoud Garga, Lead Specialist - Strategic Communication, Media Relations and Digital Campaigning, IPPF Africa Regional Office (IPPFARO) – email: [email protected] -Phone +254 704 626 920 Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Office, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) - Email: [email protected] – Phone: +254 707 952 990   ABOUT IPPF AFRICA REGION (IPPFAR) The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organization in Africa, and the leading sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy voice in the region. Headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, the overarching goal of IPPFAR is to increase access to SRHR services to the most vulnerable youth, men and women in sub-Saharan Africa. Supported by thousands of volunteers, IPPFAR tackles the continent’s growing SRHR challenges through a network of Member Associations (MAs) in 39 countries. We do this by developing our MAs into efficient entities with the capacity to deliver and sustain high quality, youth focused and gender sensitive services. We work with governments, the African Union, Regional Economic Commissions, the Pan-African Parliament, United Nations bodies among others to expand political and financial commitments to sexual and reproductive health and rights in Africa. Learn more about us on our website. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

International Youth Day
news_item

| 12 August 2021

IPPFAR Celebrates International Youth Day 2021: “Transforming Food Systems: Youth Innovation for Human and Planetary Health”

Addis Ababa, 12 August 2021 – In commemoration of the International Youth Day, The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region, through its Sub-Office to the African Union and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa hosted a virtual panel discussion on Youth, Gender Equality and Sexual Reproductive Health Rights in Transforming African Food Systems on 12 August 2021. The virtual panel discussion focused on the role of youth in advocacy towards gender equality and sustainable healthy food systems. The event also aimed at sharing recommendations to support young people's meaningful engagement in advocacy on inclusive food systems for the realization of sexual reproductive health rights on the African continent. Africa has the youngest population in the world with more than 400 million people between the ages of 15 and 35 years, which requires increased investment in economic and social development factors to improve the Development Index of its countries.   This year’s International Youth Day, celebrated under the theme: “Transforming Food Systems: Youth Innovation for Human and Planetary Health”, offers an opportunity to reflect on the interlinkages between sexual reproductive health and rights and nutrition, and on the intersectional aspects of food systems in the context of gender. “The International Youth Day helps bring attention to our issues. Young people are increasingly interested in sexual reproductive health and rights and understand, now more than ever, the importance of sexual health knowledge”, said Ms. Rosa Ayong, moderator of the panel discussion and a youth member of the IPPF Global Board of Trustees. The virtual round table panelists included Mr. Kassoum Coulibaly, President of the Global Institute for Women’s Empowerment Group, who spoke about the role of young people in promoting an inclusive food system. ‘’The International Youth Day, is a moment to evaluate our progress, empower young girls and boys, and strengthen their leadership role in the world's transformation with a gender equality vision," said Mr. Coulibaly. Panelists also included Ms. Chantal Umuhoza, who addressed the intersectional aspects of food systems in the context of gender and age, and Mr. Joshua Atabinore Akharigeya, who highlighted the impact of sexual reproductive health and rights on the food value chain from production to marketing. “Discussing Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights within the context of food value chain is ever critical. A healthy community ensures productivity and success across the food value chain, and in return, individuals and communities are economically empowered to access quality sexual reproductive health and rights services, seek justice and reduce their vulnerabilities - especially for girls and women - against sexual and gender-based violence”, said Mr. Akharigeya. Keynote speaker and Deputy Director of the UN World Food Program African Union Global Office, Ms. Magdalena Moshi, said that “actions should be taken by all stakeholders, to promote and advocate for the consumption of wholesome, nutrient dense foods for the realisation of sexual reproductive health, particularly for the female youth, as consumers". The discussions enabled youth participants to learn about their role in promoting an inclusive food system by advocating for sexual health rights through regional advocacy policies and frameworks. Giving youth a voice is a prerequisite for Africa’s transformation. Expanding opportunities for youth, women, and girls is an obligation that is essential in realizing everyone’s right to food security, nutrition, and sexual reproductive health. END Media Contacts: -Mahmoud Garga, Lead Specialist - Strategic Communication, Media Relations and Digital Campaigning, IPPF Africa Regional Office (IPPFARO) – email: [email protected] -Phone +254 704 626 920 Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Office, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) - Email: [email protected] – Phone: +254 707 952 990   ABOUT IPPF AFRICA REGION (IPPFAR) The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organization in Africa, and the leading sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy voice in the region. Headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, the overarching goal of IPPFAR is to increase access to SRHR services to the most vulnerable youth, men and women in sub-Saharan Africa. Supported by thousands of volunteers, IPPFAR tackles the continent’s growing SRHR challenges through a network of Member Associations (MAs) in 39 countries. We do this by developing our MAs into efficient entities with the capacity to deliver and sustain high quality, youth focused and gender sensitive services. We work with governments, the African Union, Regional Economic Commissions, the Pan-African Parliament, United Nations bodies among others to expand political and financial commitments to sexual and reproductive health and rights in Africa. Learn more about us on our website. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

World Population Day
news item

| 11 July 2021

World Population Day 2021: Increasing Effective Strategies for SRHR Information and Services (Focus on Malawi)

Sunday, 11 July 2021. As we commemorate the World Population Day with a projected 7.9 billion people on the planet today, our thoughts also turn to what were the reproductive needs and wants of women and girls in Africa during this extraordinary year and whether were they fulfilled. The COVID-19 pandemic has had devastating effects on the provision of health care services, including sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services, often more so in countries in Africa that are already struggling to keep up with normal preventative and curative services, let alone COVID-19 related morbidity and mortality. While fertility rates across the globe are shifting in both directions, and with Africa accounting for the top 23 highest total fertility rates (TFR)[1] in the world, the IPPF Women’s Integrated Sexual Health project (WISH2) provides SRH care to women, men and young people in 15 countries across the world - 12 of them being in Africa, including in fragile and conflict affected countries. The WISH2 program offers quality integrated and inclusive family planning and SRH services to marginalized and hard to reach populations: the poor, youth under 20 years and people living with disability. Within this framework, the WISH2 project recognized that many of these countries’ health services have been devastatingly affected by waves of the pandemic and adapted SRH services to ensure, wherever possible, continued access to SRH care to support women to achieve their reproductive intentions during the pandemic. In Malawi, we can focus in on young people against the backdrop of COVID-19 and a health system struggling to cope. Youth in Malawi face a myriad of challenges such as early marriages, unintended pregnancies, unsafe abortions, high new HIV infections, early childbearing, drug and alcohol abuse, high illiteracy rate, poverty, and HIV and AIDS pandemic. (NSRHR Policy 2017–2022). While young people make up the largest and fastest growing proportion of population in Malawi with 51% of the population below 18 years, access to SRH care remains low among Malawian youth with 41% of adolescent women aged 15–19 having an unmet need for modern contraception. As the world celebrates population day, the Family Planning Association of Malawi (FPAM), which is IPPF's Member Association in the country, has increased effective strategies for providing access to information and SRH care to youth, including persons living with disabilities throughout the pandemic in the country. Some of these strategies include; Training of youth leaders to conduct peer learning programs and training of health care providers in Youth friendly services.  Establishing youth friendly spaces at service delivery points.   Conducting awareness creation and demand for SRH services to youth including conducting dialogue sessions, and engaging on WhatsApp and other social media platforms like Facebook.  Sensitizing parents and guardians to create an enabling environment for youth to access SRH services.  Coordinating with the Malawi Council for people with disabilities (MACOHA) - a government agency - to increase access to SRHR for persons with disabilities. Community Reproductive Health Promoters sensitization on engaging with young people with disabilities in the community.  Use of the growing mobile phone market in Malawi as a new avenue for reaching young clients by working with a local mobile service operator to promote SRHR messaging on the 3-2-1 platform (a free to use mobile subscription app). These strategies can be found in full here. “Our work complements Government efforts. Through the WISH project and other projects, FPAM has been able to reach out to young women particularly in the hard-to-reach areas with SRH information and services which otherwise could not be available if FPAM was not present in those areas”, said Donald Makwakwa, Executive Director at the Family Planning Association of Malawi. In this coming year, despite reduced funding, the project will aim to continue maintaining its innovative adaptations to support access to quality SRH services and rights for women and men living in the most difficult of circumstances. Joyce Ayong, IPPF Board of Trustee member and President of the Youth Action Movement (YAM) at the Cameroon National Planning Association for Family Welfare (CAMNAFAW) highlighted the importance of youth outreach and inclusion especially in the most difficult of circumstances. “We campaign for the cause of young people so that they are taken into account. Young persons with disabilities and youth living in hard to reach areas also need to access SRH care and information and it is our duty to continue to find ways to provide these lifesaving services to them”, said Ayong. The WISH2 program will continue to find adaptive strategies ensuring that the much-needed SRH care in some of the hardest hit countries by the pandemic is delivered to the most marginalized, leaving no one behind when it comes to family planning needs. About the Women’s Integrated Sexual Health Project 2 The Women’s Integrated Sexual Health (WISH) programme offers quality integrated and inclusive family planning and sexual and reproductive health services to marginalized and hard to reach populations: the poor, youth under 20 years and people living with disability. WISH is the UK Government’s flagship programme to support integrated sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) services in a range of countries across Africa and Asia by 2021. The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) manages the WISH programme through a consortium arrangement (Lot 2) with 10 IPPF Member Associations and hand - picked partners chosen for their expertise to maximise access and reach for people in 15 countries: Development Media International (DMI), Humanity and Inclusion UK (HI), International Rescue Committee (IRC), Marie Stopes International (MSI), and Options Consultancy Services (Options). The countries are: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burundi, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Pakistan, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe. For more updates on our work, follow IPPF Africa Region on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.   [1] Total Fertility Rate 2021 (worldpopulationreview.com)  

World Population Day
news_item

| 11 July 2021

World Population Day 2021: Increasing Effective Strategies for SRHR Information and Services (Focus on Malawi)

Sunday, 11 July 2021. As we commemorate the World Population Day with a projected 7.9 billion people on the planet today, our thoughts also turn to what were the reproductive needs and wants of women and girls in Africa during this extraordinary year and whether were they fulfilled. The COVID-19 pandemic has had devastating effects on the provision of health care services, including sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services, often more so in countries in Africa that are already struggling to keep up with normal preventative and curative services, let alone COVID-19 related morbidity and mortality. While fertility rates across the globe are shifting in both directions, and with Africa accounting for the top 23 highest total fertility rates (TFR)[1] in the world, the IPPF Women’s Integrated Sexual Health project (WISH2) provides SRH care to women, men and young people in 15 countries across the world - 12 of them being in Africa, including in fragile and conflict affected countries. The WISH2 program offers quality integrated and inclusive family planning and SRH services to marginalized and hard to reach populations: the poor, youth under 20 years and people living with disability. Within this framework, the WISH2 project recognized that many of these countries’ health services have been devastatingly affected by waves of the pandemic and adapted SRH services to ensure, wherever possible, continued access to SRH care to support women to achieve their reproductive intentions during the pandemic. In Malawi, we can focus in on young people against the backdrop of COVID-19 and a health system struggling to cope. Youth in Malawi face a myriad of challenges such as early marriages, unintended pregnancies, unsafe abortions, high new HIV infections, early childbearing, drug and alcohol abuse, high illiteracy rate, poverty, and HIV and AIDS pandemic. (NSRHR Policy 2017–2022). While young people make up the largest and fastest growing proportion of population in Malawi with 51% of the population below 18 years, access to SRH care remains low among Malawian youth with 41% of adolescent women aged 15–19 having an unmet need for modern contraception. As the world celebrates population day, the Family Planning Association of Malawi (FPAM), which is IPPF's Member Association in the country, has increased effective strategies for providing access to information and SRH care to youth, including persons living with disabilities throughout the pandemic in the country. Some of these strategies include; Training of youth leaders to conduct peer learning programs and training of health care providers in Youth friendly services.  Establishing youth friendly spaces at service delivery points.   Conducting awareness creation and demand for SRH services to youth including conducting dialogue sessions, and engaging on WhatsApp and other social media platforms like Facebook.  Sensitizing parents and guardians to create an enabling environment for youth to access SRH services.  Coordinating with the Malawi Council for people with disabilities (MACOHA) - a government agency - to increase access to SRHR for persons with disabilities. Community Reproductive Health Promoters sensitization on engaging with young people with disabilities in the community.  Use of the growing mobile phone market in Malawi as a new avenue for reaching young clients by working with a local mobile service operator to promote SRHR messaging on the 3-2-1 platform (a free to use mobile subscription app). These strategies can be found in full here. “Our work complements Government efforts. Through the WISH project and other projects, FPAM has been able to reach out to young women particularly in the hard-to-reach areas with SRH information and services which otherwise could not be available if FPAM was not present in those areas”, said Donald Makwakwa, Executive Director at the Family Planning Association of Malawi. In this coming year, despite reduced funding, the project will aim to continue maintaining its innovative adaptations to support access to quality SRH services and rights for women and men living in the most difficult of circumstances. Joyce Ayong, IPPF Board of Trustee member and President of the Youth Action Movement (YAM) at the Cameroon National Planning Association for Family Welfare (CAMNAFAW) highlighted the importance of youth outreach and inclusion especially in the most difficult of circumstances. “We campaign for the cause of young people so that they are taken into account. Young persons with disabilities and youth living in hard to reach areas also need to access SRH care and information and it is our duty to continue to find ways to provide these lifesaving services to them”, said Ayong. The WISH2 program will continue to find adaptive strategies ensuring that the much-needed SRH care in some of the hardest hit countries by the pandemic is delivered to the most marginalized, leaving no one behind when it comes to family planning needs. About the Women’s Integrated Sexual Health Project 2 The Women’s Integrated Sexual Health (WISH) programme offers quality integrated and inclusive family planning and sexual and reproductive health services to marginalized and hard to reach populations: the poor, youth under 20 years and people living with disability. WISH is the UK Government’s flagship programme to support integrated sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) services in a range of countries across Africa and Asia by 2021. The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) manages the WISH programme through a consortium arrangement (Lot 2) with 10 IPPF Member Associations and hand - picked partners chosen for their expertise to maximise access and reach for people in 15 countries: Development Media International (DMI), Humanity and Inclusion UK (HI), International Rescue Committee (IRC), Marie Stopes International (MSI), and Options Consultancy Services (Options). The countries are: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burundi, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Pakistan, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe. For more updates on our work, follow IPPF Africa Region on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.   [1] Total Fertility Rate 2021 (worldpopulationreview.com)  

Generation Equality Forum
news item

| 06 July 2021

IPPF announces new commitments to Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) at the Generation Equality Forum

The Generation Equality Forum (GEF) is a global multi-stakeholder platform to reignite the worldwide commitment for gender equality, convened by UN Women and the governments of Mexico and France. The Forum kicked off in Mexico City, Mexico, on 29 – 31 March 2021, and culminated in Paris, France, on 30 June – 2 July 2021, with the aim of securing a set of concrete, ambitious, and transformative commitments to achieve irreversible progress towards gender equality; bringing together governments, civil society organizations, young people-led organizations, the private sector and foundations to define and announce ambitious investments and policies on a range of priority areas, from climate change to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), gender-based violence, feminist movements, technology and economic justice.   IPPF is proud to be one of the co-leads of the Action Coalition on Bodily Autonomy & SRHR, which aims to:  Expand access to comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) in and out of school  Increase qualitative access to contraception  Empower all people, including adolescents and women, in all their diversity to make autonomous choices about their bodies, sexuality and reproduction  Strengthen girls, women’s and feminist organizations and networks to promote and protect bodily autonomy and SRHR.  IPPF has joined the two collective commitments of this Action Coalition on abortion and CSE.  IPPF’s individual commitment at GEF  By 2026, IPPF commits to work to accelerate universal access to safe abortion care centered on three principles – rights-based, reproductive justice and gender transformative – with a focus on the following strategies:   Expand and improve the provision of abortion care through 102 Member Associations, including quality medical and surgical abortion, person-centered abortion self-care support, and abortion care beyond 12 weeks of gestation through a simplified outpatient model using task-shifting to mid-level providers, including self-managed medical abortion.   Fully integrate abortion care into humanitarian preparedness and response as full realization of SRHR, with all IPPF emergency responses providing abortion care as a standard part of the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP).  Advocate for the decriminalization of abortion and the removal of coercive policies and legislation on abortion in 25 countries, and advocate to donor governments and agencies to remove restrictions preventing work and dialogue on abortion, including the permanent repeal of the Global Gag Rule.  IPPF is also pleased to announce that it will be working with the Governments of Canada, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden and the Netherlands to help realize universal access to sexual and reproductive health and rights and CSE.   IPPF’s Director-General, Dr Alvaro Bermejo, said:  “Since Beijing, progress has been made towards gender equality, yet not a single country can claim to have achieved it. It’s simple; women and girls cannot wait any longer to live a life free from discrimination, free from gender-based violence and free from harmful patriarchal gender norms – we must replace rhetoric with meaningful action. "As co-leaders of the Action Coalition on Bodily Autonomy and SRHR, we are convinced that you cannot achieve gender equality without SRHR, and urge that it be at the center of policies and decision-making processes. IPPF, alongside its partners and Member Associations, will turn our commitments into meaningful action that accelerates our shared goal of achieving gender equality.”  IPPF’s Global Advocacy Director, Anamaria Bejar, added:  “Women and girls cannot afford more broken promises. Now is the time to renew our determination to make the Beijing Platform for Action a reality for every woman and girl in the world, to live with dignity and reach their full potential. That is why IPPF wholeheartedly support the Generation Equality Forum and what it stands for. Together, we can meaningfully work towards gender equality in our lifetime.”  Fore more details about IPPF's commitments at GEF, click here. Follow IPPF Africa Region on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

Generation Equality Forum
news_item

| 06 July 2021

IPPF announces new commitments to Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) at the Generation Equality Forum

The Generation Equality Forum (GEF) is a global multi-stakeholder platform to reignite the worldwide commitment for gender equality, convened by UN Women and the governments of Mexico and France. The Forum kicked off in Mexico City, Mexico, on 29 – 31 March 2021, and culminated in Paris, France, on 30 June – 2 July 2021, with the aim of securing a set of concrete, ambitious, and transformative commitments to achieve irreversible progress towards gender equality; bringing together governments, civil society organizations, young people-led organizations, the private sector and foundations to define and announce ambitious investments and policies on a range of priority areas, from climate change to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), gender-based violence, feminist movements, technology and economic justice.   IPPF is proud to be one of the co-leads of the Action Coalition on Bodily Autonomy & SRHR, which aims to:  Expand access to comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) in and out of school  Increase qualitative access to contraception  Empower all people, including adolescents and women, in all their diversity to make autonomous choices about their bodies, sexuality and reproduction  Strengthen girls, women’s and feminist organizations and networks to promote and protect bodily autonomy and SRHR.  IPPF has joined the two collective commitments of this Action Coalition on abortion and CSE.  IPPF’s individual commitment at GEF  By 2026, IPPF commits to work to accelerate universal access to safe abortion care centered on three principles – rights-based, reproductive justice and gender transformative – with a focus on the following strategies:   Expand and improve the provision of abortion care through 102 Member Associations, including quality medical and surgical abortion, person-centered abortion self-care support, and abortion care beyond 12 weeks of gestation through a simplified outpatient model using task-shifting to mid-level providers, including self-managed medical abortion.   Fully integrate abortion care into humanitarian preparedness and response as full realization of SRHR, with all IPPF emergency responses providing abortion care as a standard part of the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP).  Advocate for the decriminalization of abortion and the removal of coercive policies and legislation on abortion in 25 countries, and advocate to donor governments and agencies to remove restrictions preventing work and dialogue on abortion, including the permanent repeal of the Global Gag Rule.  IPPF is also pleased to announce that it will be working with the Governments of Canada, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden and the Netherlands to help realize universal access to sexual and reproductive health and rights and CSE.   IPPF’s Director-General, Dr Alvaro Bermejo, said:  “Since Beijing, progress has been made towards gender equality, yet not a single country can claim to have achieved it. It’s simple; women and girls cannot wait any longer to live a life free from discrimination, free from gender-based violence and free from harmful patriarchal gender norms – we must replace rhetoric with meaningful action. "As co-leaders of the Action Coalition on Bodily Autonomy and SRHR, we are convinced that you cannot achieve gender equality without SRHR, and urge that it be at the center of policies and decision-making processes. IPPF, alongside its partners and Member Associations, will turn our commitments into meaningful action that accelerates our shared goal of achieving gender equality.”  IPPF’s Global Advocacy Director, Anamaria Bejar, added:  “Women and girls cannot afford more broken promises. Now is the time to renew our determination to make the Beijing Platform for Action a reality for every woman and girl in the world, to live with dignity and reach their full potential. That is why IPPF wholeheartedly support the Generation Equality Forum and what it stands for. Together, we can meaningfully work towards gender equality in our lifetime.”  Fore more details about IPPF's commitments at GEF, click here. Follow IPPF Africa Region on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

MSF International Activity Report Illustration image
news item

| 29 June 2021

The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region is utterly shocked at the killing of three MSF staff members in Tigray, Ethiopia

Nairobi, 28 June 2021 - The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) joins Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) and the entire humanitarian community in strongly condemning the killing of three MSF humanitarian workers in Tigray, Ethiopia. IPPFAR is deeply shocked and horrified after receiving confirmation of the murder of Maria Hernandez, Yohannes Halefom Reda and Tedros Gebremariam Gebremichael on 25 June 2021 in Tigray. “The murder of humanitarian workers is an unacceptable and heinous violation of International Humanitarian Law. No words can convey the shock and outrage resulting from these appalling acts, and the perpetrators must be found and held accountable”, said Alvaro Bermejo, IPPF Director General. “Humanitarian and health workers must never be targeted, and security forces have an obligation to protect and respect our colleagues delivering services in conflict areas and elsewhere”, added Bermejo. IPPFAR stands in solidarity with the entire humanitarian community in conveying its deepest condolences to the family, friends and colleagues of the victims. END   Media Contacts: -Mahmoud Garga, Lead Specialist - Strategic Communication, Media Relations and Digital Campaigning, IPPF Africa Regional Office (IPPFARO) – email: [email protected] -Phone +254 704 626 920 Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Officer, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) - Email: [email protected] 

MSF International Activity Report Illustration image
news_item

| 29 June 2021

The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region is utterly shocked at the killing of three MSF staff members in Tigray, Ethiopia

Nairobi, 28 June 2021 - The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) joins Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) and the entire humanitarian community in strongly condemning the killing of three MSF humanitarian workers in Tigray, Ethiopia. IPPFAR is deeply shocked and horrified after receiving confirmation of the murder of Maria Hernandez, Yohannes Halefom Reda and Tedros Gebremariam Gebremichael on 25 June 2021 in Tigray. “The murder of humanitarian workers is an unacceptable and heinous violation of International Humanitarian Law. No words can convey the shock and outrage resulting from these appalling acts, and the perpetrators must be found and held accountable”, said Alvaro Bermejo, IPPF Director General. “Humanitarian and health workers must never be targeted, and security forces have an obligation to protect and respect our colleagues delivering services in conflict areas and elsewhere”, added Bermejo. IPPFAR stands in solidarity with the entire humanitarian community in conveying its deepest condolences to the family, friends and colleagues of the victims. END   Media Contacts: -Mahmoud Garga, Lead Specialist - Strategic Communication, Media Relations and Digital Campaigning, IPPF Africa Regional Office (IPPFARO) – email: [email protected] -Phone +254 704 626 920 Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Officer, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) - Email: [email protected] 

Adapting family planning services in time of crisis introduction
news item

| 28 June 2021

Adapting family planning services in time of crisis: Innovations by the IPPF Africa Region Member Associations

  On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. The impact of the pandemic would be felt across the world in all sectors, including health, where major disruptions were witnessed. Access to basic health information and services, including sexual reproductive health (SRH) information and services became constrained owing to various government-led protective directives such as restrictions on movement, lockdowns and curfews. The pandemic also put a strain on IPPF Member Associations (MAs) across the world. MAs are IPPF affiliated locally owned health organizations which provide a wide range of sexual reproductive health information and services. The pandemic saw many MAs cut down on their services, with some having to shut down completely or suspend some of their operations in their static clinics, community-based outlets and mobile outreach services. Surveys conducted by the IPPF Africa Region in April and June 2020 to establish the impact of Covid 19 on its MAs established that a total of 1,405 service delivery points (SDPs) were reported to have been closed during round 1 of the survey while 2,161 SDPs were closed during round 2 out of the 13,049 service delivery points reported in 2019. 447 mobile clinics were also shut down. These disruptions affected people’s access to the essential sexual reproductive healthcare services provided in our MA facilities, such as family planning services, sexually transmitted infections services, maternal and child health services, among others. Young people were no longer able to congregate at the youth-friendly centers where they would access SRH information and services. This called for innovation on the part of IPPF in ensuring that the populations, especially the vulnerable and marginalized, continued accessing SRH services. Various partners came on board to mitigate the gap occasioned by COVID-19 by providing various resources for this, including financial resources. These donors included Global Affairs Canada (GAC), Levi Strauss Foundation and Danida. The Danida grant for COVID-19 was disbursed to 45 IPPF MAs in the Africa region and was geared towards filling the gap created by the pandemic by ensuring there was continued SRH service delivery despite the challenges. The interventions facilitated by these grants have yielded commendable results, as more than 100 million SRH services were reported in the Africa Region - mostly women, girls, the vulnerable and hard-to-reach populations have been able to access SRH information and services. The range of services, offered by the MAs in partnership with government agencies and development partners in the private sector, included ante-natal and post-natal care, childbirth services, family planning services, STI treatment and management services, Comprehensive Sexuality Education (CSE) for the young people, Sexual and Gender-Based Violence (SGBV) services. In a series of five case studies, we highlight some innovations and adaptations developed by IPPF Africa Region MAs, that enabled thousands of their target populations to continue accessing quality and affordable sexual reproductive health and rights (SRHR) information and services amidst the pandemic. Cameroun: Adopting a Home-based Service Delivery Approach Nigeria: Establishing Digital Health Interventions Zambia: Training Women on Self-Managed Care for Contraception Benin: Bringing Comprehensive Sexuality Education Online Sao Tome: A Clinic on Wheels 

Adapting family planning services in time of crisis introduction
news_item

| 28 June 2021

Adapting family planning services in time of crisis: Innovations by the IPPF Africa Region Member Associations

  On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. The impact of the pandemic would be felt across the world in all sectors, including health, where major disruptions were witnessed. Access to basic health information and services, including sexual reproductive health (SRH) information and services became constrained owing to various government-led protective directives such as restrictions on movement, lockdowns and curfews. The pandemic also put a strain on IPPF Member Associations (MAs) across the world. MAs are IPPF affiliated locally owned health organizations which provide a wide range of sexual reproductive health information and services. The pandemic saw many MAs cut down on their services, with some having to shut down completely or suspend some of their operations in their static clinics, community-based outlets and mobile outreach services. Surveys conducted by the IPPF Africa Region in April and June 2020 to establish the impact of Covid 19 on its MAs established that a total of 1,405 service delivery points (SDPs) were reported to have been closed during round 1 of the survey while 2,161 SDPs were closed during round 2 out of the 13,049 service delivery points reported in 2019. 447 mobile clinics were also shut down. These disruptions affected people’s access to the essential sexual reproductive healthcare services provided in our MA facilities, such as family planning services, sexually transmitted infections services, maternal and child health services, among others. Young people were no longer able to congregate at the youth-friendly centers where they would access SRH information and services. This called for innovation on the part of IPPF in ensuring that the populations, especially the vulnerable and marginalized, continued accessing SRH services. Various partners came on board to mitigate the gap occasioned by COVID-19 by providing various resources for this, including financial resources. These donors included Global Affairs Canada (GAC), Levi Strauss Foundation and Danida. The Danida grant for COVID-19 was disbursed to 45 IPPF MAs in the Africa region and was geared towards filling the gap created by the pandemic by ensuring there was continued SRH service delivery despite the challenges. The interventions facilitated by these grants have yielded commendable results, as more than 100 million SRH services were reported in the Africa Region - mostly women, girls, the vulnerable and hard-to-reach populations have been able to access SRH information and services. The range of services, offered by the MAs in partnership with government agencies and development partners in the private sector, included ante-natal and post-natal care, childbirth services, family planning services, STI treatment and management services, Comprehensive Sexuality Education (CSE) for the young people, Sexual and Gender-Based Violence (SGBV) services. In a series of five case studies, we highlight some innovations and adaptations developed by IPPF Africa Region MAs, that enabled thousands of their target populations to continue accessing quality and affordable sexual reproductive health and rights (SRHR) information and services amidst the pandemic. Cameroun: Adopting a Home-based Service Delivery Approach Nigeria: Establishing Digital Health Interventions Zambia: Training Women on Self-Managed Care for Contraception Benin: Bringing Comprehensive Sexuality Education Online Sao Tome: A Clinic on Wheels 

IPPF regional and youth forums
news item

| 26 June 2021

The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region holds its first Youth and Regional Forums

Nairobi, 25 June 2021 - The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) held its first ever Youth Forum and Regional Forum from 22 to 25 June 2021. The forums, which took place virtually, were attended by over 120 participants drawn from 39 countries across the region. Participants included representatives from the Youth Action Movement (YAM) - the youth arm of IPPF Africa Region's volunteer body based within the Member Associations (MAs) -, Executive Directors from MAs in the Africa Region, MA Board Presidents, the IPPF Director General, the IPPF Board of Trustees, and the Africa Regional Secretariat staff. The Youth Forum and the Regional Forum, which are the first-ever forums to be held within the Federation in line with the new IPPF governance reforms of November 2019, were aimed at fostering collaboration, sharing experiences, successes, challenges and best practices among IPPFAR’s MAs. In November 2019, IPPF overhauled its governance and resource allocation system to address concerns of its MAs, donors and other stakeholders. The reforms resulted in the adoption of an MA-centric approach aimed at strengthening MAs and making them more efficient, effective, and accountable. In his keynote speech, the IPPF Director General, Dr. Alvaro Bermejo, noted the resilience that MAs had demonstrated in delivering on their core mandate; that of providing quality sexual reproductive health (SRH) services to poor and vulnerable populations in sub-Saharan Africa. “The unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic placed tremendous strain on healthcare systems globally, and I commend our Member Associations for their continued efforts to offer much-needed SRH services to those who need them”, said Bermejo. In 2020, MAs in the Africa region provided a total number of 105,429,716 sexual reproductive health services. These included 56,670,238 family planning services, 1,783,523 safe abortion services and 1,939,051 Gender-Based Violence (GBV) services. Women received 89% of the services provided, while young people accounted for 55% of the total SRH services provided. Notably, and despite the challenging COVID-19 circumstances, the Africa Region provided 14,6 million couple-year protection (CYP) - its highest volume ever achieved – which is the  estimated protection provided by contraceptive methods, based upon the volume of all contraceptives sold or distributed free of charge to clients during the year[1]. In light of the rapidly changing political and financial context in which MAs have had to and must continue to deliver lifesaving services, some of the successful adaptive strategies they have implemented included innovations in health service delivery such as home-based service delivery in Cameroon, self-managed contraception care in Zambia, and the adoption of Digital Health Strategies in the form of online Comprehensive Sexuality Education in Benin, or the use of different social media platforms for SRH information and services in Nigeria.  With young people at the heart of IPPF’s work, the IPPF Africa Regional Director Marie-Evelyne Pétrus-Barry emphasized the role of this invaluable group. “In our organization, we have embraced young people as partners, and they are at the core of our global strategy and business plan. We highly value youth involvement across all areas of our work, including in our governance structures. We benefit from their ideas and contributions, with many of our achievements being significantly contributed by them,” she said in a speech delivered on her behalf by Mr. Sam Ntelamo, the Acting Regional Director. Young people attending the forum also lauded IPPFAR for their inclusion in its operations. “There is nothing about us without us, and as young people, IPPFAR continues to exemplify this. Through the MAs, the organization has provided us with safe spaces to discuss our issues and youth-friendly clinics where we comfortably seek sensitive services in a comfortable manner. We are also involved in making programme decisions and implementing them. As young people, we feel appreciated,” said Marian Pleasant Kargbo, YAM President in Sierra Leone. The first-ever IPPFAR Youth and Regional forums presented a great opportunity for all participants to collectively discuss and learn about how to diversify their funding base while strengthening their networks and partnerships across all levels for the benefit of the people we serve.   Media Contacts: - Mahmoud Garga, Lead Specialist - Strategic Communication, Media Relations and Digital Campaigning, IPPF Africa Regional Office (IPPFARO) – email: [email protected] -Phone +254 704 626 920 - Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Officer, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) - Email: [email protected]  ABOUT IPPF AFRICA REGION (IPPFAR) The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organization in Africa, and the leading sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy voice in the region. Headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, the overarching goal of IPPFAR is to increase access to SRHR services to the most vulnerable youth, men and women in sub-Saharan Africa. Supported by thousands of volunteers, IPPFAR tackles the continent’s growing SRHR challenges through a network of Member Associations (MAs) in 39 countries. We do this by developing our MAs into efficient entities with the capacity to deliver and sustain high-quality, youth-focused and gender-sensitive services. We work with governments, the African Union, Regional Economic Commissions, the Pan-African Parliament, United Nations bodies among others to expand political and financial commitments to sexual and reproductive health and rights in Africa. Learn more about us on our website. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.   [1] The CYP is calculated by multiplying the quantity of each method distributed to clients by a conversion factor, to yield an estimate of the duration of contraceptive protection provided per unit of that method. The CYP for each method is then summed for all methods to obtain a total CYP figure. CYP conversion factors are based on how a method is used, failure rates, wastage, and how many units of the method are typically needed to provide one year of contraceptive protection for a couple. The calculation takes into account that some methods, like condoms and oral contraceptives, for example, maybe used incorrectly and then discarded, or that IUDs and implants may be removed before their life span is realized. The term "CYP" reflects distribution and is a way to estimate coverage and not actual use or impact. The CYP calculation provides an immediate indication of the volume of program activity.  

IPPF regional and youth forums
news_item

| 26 June 2021

The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region holds its first Youth and Regional Forums

Nairobi, 25 June 2021 - The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) held its first ever Youth Forum and Regional Forum from 22 to 25 June 2021. The forums, which took place virtually, were attended by over 120 participants drawn from 39 countries across the region. Participants included representatives from the Youth Action Movement (YAM) - the youth arm of IPPF Africa Region's volunteer body based within the Member Associations (MAs) -, Executive Directors from MAs in the Africa Region, MA Board Presidents, the IPPF Director General, the IPPF Board of Trustees, and the Africa Regional Secretariat staff. The Youth Forum and the Regional Forum, which are the first-ever forums to be held within the Federation in line with the new IPPF governance reforms of November 2019, were aimed at fostering collaboration, sharing experiences, successes, challenges and best practices among IPPFAR’s MAs. In November 2019, IPPF overhauled its governance and resource allocation system to address concerns of its MAs, donors and other stakeholders. The reforms resulted in the adoption of an MA-centric approach aimed at strengthening MAs and making them more efficient, effective, and accountable. In his keynote speech, the IPPF Director General, Dr. Alvaro Bermejo, noted the resilience that MAs had demonstrated in delivering on their core mandate; that of providing quality sexual reproductive health (SRH) services to poor and vulnerable populations in sub-Saharan Africa. “The unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic placed tremendous strain on healthcare systems globally, and I commend our Member Associations for their continued efforts to offer much-needed SRH services to those who need them”, said Bermejo. In 2020, MAs in the Africa region provided a total number of 105,429,716 sexual reproductive health services. These included 56,670,238 family planning services, 1,783,523 safe abortion services and 1,939,051 Gender-Based Violence (GBV) services. Women received 89% of the services provided, while young people accounted for 55% of the total SRH services provided. Notably, and despite the challenging COVID-19 circumstances, the Africa Region provided 14,6 million couple-year protection (CYP) - its highest volume ever achieved – which is the  estimated protection provided by contraceptive methods, based upon the volume of all contraceptives sold or distributed free of charge to clients during the year[1]. In light of the rapidly changing political and financial context in which MAs have had to and must continue to deliver lifesaving services, some of the successful adaptive strategies they have implemented included innovations in health service delivery such as home-based service delivery in Cameroon, self-managed contraception care in Zambia, and the adoption of Digital Health Strategies in the form of online Comprehensive Sexuality Education in Benin, or the use of different social media platforms for SRH information and services in Nigeria.  With young people at the heart of IPPF’s work, the IPPF Africa Regional Director Marie-Evelyne Pétrus-Barry emphasized the role of this invaluable group. “In our organization, we have embraced young people as partners, and they are at the core of our global strategy and business plan. We highly value youth involvement across all areas of our work, including in our governance structures. We benefit from their ideas and contributions, with many of our achievements being significantly contributed by them,” she said in a speech delivered on her behalf by Mr. Sam Ntelamo, the Acting Regional Director. Young people attending the forum also lauded IPPFAR for their inclusion in its operations. “There is nothing about us without us, and as young people, IPPFAR continues to exemplify this. Through the MAs, the organization has provided us with safe spaces to discuss our issues and youth-friendly clinics where we comfortably seek sensitive services in a comfortable manner. We are also involved in making programme decisions and implementing them. As young people, we feel appreciated,” said Marian Pleasant Kargbo, YAM President in Sierra Leone. The first-ever IPPFAR Youth and Regional forums presented a great opportunity for all participants to collectively discuss and learn about how to diversify their funding base while strengthening their networks and partnerships across all levels for the benefit of the people we serve.   Media Contacts: - Mahmoud Garga, Lead Specialist - Strategic Communication, Media Relations and Digital Campaigning, IPPF Africa Regional Office (IPPFARO) – email: [email protected] -Phone +254 704 626 920 - Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Officer, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) - Email: [email protected]  ABOUT IPPF AFRICA REGION (IPPFAR) The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organization in Africa, and the leading sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy voice in the region. Headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, the overarching goal of IPPFAR is to increase access to SRHR services to the most vulnerable youth, men and women in sub-Saharan Africa. Supported by thousands of volunteers, IPPFAR tackles the continent’s growing SRHR challenges through a network of Member Associations (MAs) in 39 countries. We do this by developing our MAs into efficient entities with the capacity to deliver and sustain high-quality, youth-focused and gender-sensitive services. We work with governments, the African Union, Regional Economic Commissions, the Pan-African Parliament, United Nations bodies among others to expand political and financial commitments to sexual and reproductive health and rights in Africa. Learn more about us on our website. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.   [1] The CYP is calculated by multiplying the quantity of each method distributed to clients by a conversion factor, to yield an estimate of the duration of contraceptive protection provided per unit of that method. The CYP for each method is then summed for all methods to obtain a total CYP figure. CYP conversion factors are based on how a method is used, failure rates, wastage, and how many units of the method are typically needed to provide one year of contraceptive protection for a couple. The calculation takes into account that some methods, like condoms and oral contraceptives, for example, maybe used incorrectly and then discarded, or that IUDs and implants may be removed before their life span is realized. The term "CYP" reflects distribution and is a way to estimate coverage and not actual use or impact. The CYP calculation provides an immediate indication of the volume of program activity.