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African_Parliamentarians
news item

| 08 December 2016

Africa Parliamentary Forum on Population and Development (FPA) Elects New Executive Committee

24 November 2016, Dakar, Senegal The Africa Parliamentary Forum on Population and Development (FPA) held its statutory General Assembly (GA) in Dakar, Senegal on 24 November 2016. The FPA GA which is held every three years, was organized by the International Planned Parenthood Federation Liaison Office to the African Union, acting as FPA Secretariat, and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). The General Assembly was attended by 70 Members of Parliament from 30 countries including Deputy Speakers of Parliament from Benin Mali, Niger and the host country Senegal, representing the four regions of Sub- Saharan Africa (East, South, Central and West). Related: Parliamentarians are Key to Realizing Demographic Dividend in Africa Among speakers at the General Assembly included Hon. Mously Diakhate, President of the Senegalese Parliamentarian Network on Population and Development; Hon. Marie Rose Nguini Effa, Vice President of the FPA; Mr Mabingue Ngom, UNFPA WCARO Regional Director; Mr Lucien Kouakou, IPPF Africa Regional Director and Mr Sam Ntelamo, IPPF Representative to the African Union. The highlight of the General Assembly was the election of the new Executive Committee: Hon. Marie Rose Nguini Effa (Cameroon) and Hon. Paul Chibingu (Malawi) were elected respectively as President and Vice President of the forum. The following constitutes the entire membership of the new Executive Committee by sub-region. EAST AFRICA: Tanzania (Jamal Kassim Ali), Comoros (Hon Hadjira Oumouri) CENTRAL AFRICA: Hon Marie Rose Nguini Effa (Cameroon), Hon Issa Mardo Djabir (Chad) SOUTHERN AFRICA: Hon. Paul Chibingu (Malawi), Hon.  Goodlucky Kwaramba (Zimbabwe) WEST AFRICA: Hon. Mously Diakhate (Senegal) and Hon. Larry P. Younquoi (Liberia) Also Read: African Parliamentarians Discuss the Demographic Dividend Agenda Follow IPPF Africa Region on Facebook and Twitter for more updates on our work.

African_Parliamentarians
news_item

| 24 November 2016

Africa Parliamentary Forum on Population and Development (FPA) Elects New Executive Committee

24 November 2016, Dakar, Senegal The Africa Parliamentary Forum on Population and Development (FPA) held its statutory General Assembly (GA) in Dakar, Senegal on 24 November 2016. The FPA GA which is held every three years, was organized by the International Planned Parenthood Federation Liaison Office to the African Union, acting as FPA Secretariat, and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). The General Assembly was attended by 70 Members of Parliament from 30 countries including Deputy Speakers of Parliament from Benin Mali, Niger and the host country Senegal, representing the four regions of Sub- Saharan Africa (East, South, Central and West). Related: Parliamentarians are Key to Realizing Demographic Dividend in Africa Among speakers at the General Assembly included Hon. Mously Diakhate, President of the Senegalese Parliamentarian Network on Population and Development; Hon. Marie Rose Nguini Effa, Vice President of the FPA; Mr Mabingue Ngom, UNFPA WCARO Regional Director; Mr Lucien Kouakou, IPPF Africa Regional Director and Mr Sam Ntelamo, IPPF Representative to the African Union. The highlight of the General Assembly was the election of the new Executive Committee: Hon. Marie Rose Nguini Effa (Cameroon) and Hon. Paul Chibingu (Malawi) were elected respectively as President and Vice President of the forum. The following constitutes the entire membership of the new Executive Committee by sub-region. EAST AFRICA: Tanzania (Jamal Kassim Ali), Comoros (Hon Hadjira Oumouri) CENTRAL AFRICA: Hon Marie Rose Nguini Effa (Cameroon), Hon Issa Mardo Djabir (Chad) SOUTHERN AFRICA: Hon. Paul Chibingu (Malawi), Hon.  Goodlucky Kwaramba (Zimbabwe) WEST AFRICA: Hon. Mously Diakhate (Senegal) and Hon. Larry P. Younquoi (Liberia) Also Read: African Parliamentarians Discuss the Demographic Dividend Agenda Follow IPPF Africa Region on Facebook and Twitter for more updates on our work.

The delegation has so far engaged in fruitful discussions with the UNFPA Country Representative, M Saturnin Epie.
news item

| 14 November 2016

Partners Laud ATBEF for it's Significant Contribution to Togo's Development

1 November 2016, Lome, Togo Mr. Lucien Kouakou, the IPPF Africa Regional Director is currently on an Advocacy mission in Lome Togo, where he is undertaking engagements with key SRHR partners in the country, including those affiliated to the Association Togolaise pour le Bien-Etre Familial (ATBEF). ATBEF is one of IPPFAR’s 42 Member Associations. Accompanying Mr. Kouakou in his mission is Dr. Dorothy Yevide, President of the Association Béninoise pour la Planification Familiale (ABPF) representing the Regional President of IPPF, and Ms. Denise Murekatete, IPPFAR Program Advisor. The delegation has so far engaged in fruitful discussions with the UNFPA Country Representative, M Saturnin Epie. During their discussions, the IPPFAR delegation appreciated the continued collaboration between ATBEF and UNFPA, with IPPFAR pledging to strengthen this partnership through among others, the implementation of the Community-based distribution of contraceptives, including the injectable.  The IPPFAR delegation also met the President of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Togo, M. Essohouna Meba, who lauded IPPFAR for the significant contribution that ATBEF has made in Togo, more so towards the achievement of the country’s development goals. He further pledged his commitment to being ATBEF’s spokesman in the private business sector. The IPPFAR team continues its advocacy mission this week, together with the Ambassador of The Youth Action Movement –Togo chapter.  

The delegation has so far engaged in fruitful discussions with the UNFPA Country Representative, M Saturnin Epie.
news_item

| 14 November 2016

Partners Laud ATBEF for it's Significant Contribution to Togo's Development

1 November 2016, Lome, Togo Mr. Lucien Kouakou, the IPPF Africa Regional Director is currently on an Advocacy mission in Lome Togo, where he is undertaking engagements with key SRHR partners in the country, including those affiliated to the Association Togolaise pour le Bien-Etre Familial (ATBEF). ATBEF is one of IPPFAR’s 42 Member Associations. Accompanying Mr. Kouakou in his mission is Dr. Dorothy Yevide, President of the Association Béninoise pour la Planification Familiale (ABPF) representing the Regional President of IPPF, and Ms. Denise Murekatete, IPPFAR Program Advisor. The delegation has so far engaged in fruitful discussions with the UNFPA Country Representative, M Saturnin Epie. During their discussions, the IPPFAR delegation appreciated the continued collaboration between ATBEF and UNFPA, with IPPFAR pledging to strengthen this partnership through among others, the implementation of the Community-based distribution of contraceptives, including the injectable.  The IPPFAR delegation also met the President of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Togo, M. Essohouna Meba, who lauded IPPFAR for the significant contribution that ATBEF has made in Togo, more so towards the achievement of the country’s development goals. He further pledged his commitment to being ATBEF’s spokesman in the private business sector. The IPPFAR team continues its advocacy mission this week, together with the Ambassador of The Youth Action Movement –Togo chapter.  

 IPPF Director General Tewodros Melesse during an African First Ladies’ seminar
news item

| 14 November 2016

"We Must Prioritize Women's Health in Africa as the Key to Development" -Tewodros Melesse

Saturday 27 August 2016, Nairobi, Kenya The IPPF Director General, Mr. Tewodros Melesse has decried the shyness -and sometimes hypocrisy with which issues of Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) are dealt with in Africa, especially by its leaders. “When talking about development, there has always been the tendency to prioritize other issues, but not those of sexuality. Yet, conversations about Africa’s development cannot be meaningful without giving credence to reproductive health rights, and more so those pertaining to girls and women. If we fail to tackle women’s challenges in accessing quality healthcare, then we cannot make progress with regard to women’s empowerment. Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights are fundamental to women’s advancement, and women’s advancement means development for Africa. This must be recognized and prioritized by our African governments,” he said. Mr. Melesse was speaking during an African First Ladies’ seminar titled: ‘Investing in Child and Maternal Health for Social Transformation in Africa: Spotlight on Evidence Based Interventions’. The seminar was organized by the African First Ladies’ attending the sixth Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD VI). In his remarks, Mr. Melesse cited the various impediments to African women’s success, such as early marriages –which leads to many girls ending thier schooling. “With no education, this only creates fertile grounds for her poverty and that of her family. Further, when a woman has no access to family planning information and services, then she is not able to adequately space her births or have the number of desired children, and with many mouths to feed, then this becomes a great challenge for her –only enhancing her poverty status. It also becomes hard for her to gain meaningful employment or sustain a job, more so when she has to take frequent breaks from work to care for her pregnancies or young children. That is the reality, especially in the private sector,” he said. Mr. Melesse said that tackling sexual reproductive health and rights for women is one of the sure ways to elevate the status of African women. “Supporting women’s rights means that we will have more women represented in the higher echelons of power, including in Parliament. It also means that we will have more women who are able to attain a tertiary education status. It will also mean that we will have more women in the employment sector, and more women in entrepreneurship, among other sectors,” he said. Mr. Melesse also recognized some of the progress that has been made with regard to the support of Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights in the continent. “Most African governments have aligned themselves with the stipulations of the Maputo Plan of Action (MPoA), together with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This progress has to be acknowledged. However, while we have the framework, the key issue is their implementation, where African governments must honor their commitments towards Africa’s development. I must also commend Kenya’s First Lady H.E Margaret Kenyatta for her ‘Beyond Zero Campaign’, which is indeed an example of a noble initiative that can be emulated across the region, as it focuses on women’s health, and especially maternal health,” he said. Mr. Melesse reiterated the fact that health is critical to development, and women’s health is central to this. “We must not be shy to talk about sex and reproductive health. We must have these conversations that will ensure that every African child is wanted, that every African woman is healthy, and that she is a human being whose rights are respected,” he concluded. Other panelists included: Dr. Mustapha Sidiki Kaloko –African Union Commissioner for Social Affairs, Dr. Matshidiso Moeti –Regional Director, WHO Regional Office for Africa, Dr. Seth Berkley, Chief Executive Officer GAVI –the Vaccine Alliance, Ms. Katherine Perry, Country Coordinator (Kenya) U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), and a representative of Dr. Babatunde Osotimehin, Executive Director, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). The session was moderated by Ms. Julie Gichuru, Kenyan journalist and host of Africa Leadership Dialogues

 IPPF Director General Tewodros Melesse during an African First Ladies’ seminar
news_item

| 14 November 2016

"We Must Prioritize Women's Health in Africa as the Key to Development" -Tewodros Melesse

Saturday 27 August 2016, Nairobi, Kenya The IPPF Director General, Mr. Tewodros Melesse has decried the shyness -and sometimes hypocrisy with which issues of Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) are dealt with in Africa, especially by its leaders. “When talking about development, there has always been the tendency to prioritize other issues, but not those of sexuality. Yet, conversations about Africa’s development cannot be meaningful without giving credence to reproductive health rights, and more so those pertaining to girls and women. If we fail to tackle women’s challenges in accessing quality healthcare, then we cannot make progress with regard to women’s empowerment. Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights are fundamental to women’s advancement, and women’s advancement means development for Africa. This must be recognized and prioritized by our African governments,” he said. Mr. Melesse was speaking during an African First Ladies’ seminar titled: ‘Investing in Child and Maternal Health for Social Transformation in Africa: Spotlight on Evidence Based Interventions’. The seminar was organized by the African First Ladies’ attending the sixth Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD VI). In his remarks, Mr. Melesse cited the various impediments to African women’s success, such as early marriages –which leads to many girls ending thier schooling. “With no education, this only creates fertile grounds for her poverty and that of her family. Further, when a woman has no access to family planning information and services, then she is not able to adequately space her births or have the number of desired children, and with many mouths to feed, then this becomes a great challenge for her –only enhancing her poverty status. It also becomes hard for her to gain meaningful employment or sustain a job, more so when she has to take frequent breaks from work to care for her pregnancies or young children. That is the reality, especially in the private sector,” he said. Mr. Melesse said that tackling sexual reproductive health and rights for women is one of the sure ways to elevate the status of African women. “Supporting women’s rights means that we will have more women represented in the higher echelons of power, including in Parliament. It also means that we will have more women who are able to attain a tertiary education status. It will also mean that we will have more women in the employment sector, and more women in entrepreneurship, among other sectors,” he said. Mr. Melesse also recognized some of the progress that has been made with regard to the support of Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights in the continent. “Most African governments have aligned themselves with the stipulations of the Maputo Plan of Action (MPoA), together with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This progress has to be acknowledged. However, while we have the framework, the key issue is their implementation, where African governments must honor their commitments towards Africa’s development. I must also commend Kenya’s First Lady H.E Margaret Kenyatta for her ‘Beyond Zero Campaign’, which is indeed an example of a noble initiative that can be emulated across the region, as it focuses on women’s health, and especially maternal health,” he said. Mr. Melesse reiterated the fact that health is critical to development, and women’s health is central to this. “We must not be shy to talk about sex and reproductive health. We must have these conversations that will ensure that every African child is wanted, that every African woman is healthy, and that she is a human being whose rights are respected,” he concluded. Other panelists included: Dr. Mustapha Sidiki Kaloko –African Union Commissioner for Social Affairs, Dr. Matshidiso Moeti –Regional Director, WHO Regional Office for Africa, Dr. Seth Berkley, Chief Executive Officer GAVI –the Vaccine Alliance, Ms. Katherine Perry, Country Coordinator (Kenya) U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), and a representative of Dr. Babatunde Osotimehin, Executive Director, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). The session was moderated by Ms. Julie Gichuru, Kenyan journalist and host of Africa Leadership Dialogues

IPPF humanitarian in Africa
news item

| 05 October 2016

Leading the humanitarian response

Today is the World Humanitarian Day (WHD), which is day set aside to honor and pay tribute to aid workers who risk their lives in humanitarian service. It is also a day to mobilize people to advocate for a more humane world. In humanitarian situations arising from conflict, responses to those affected often come from different quarters, such as aid agencies, NGOs, the government and neighboring countries. But while most emergency responses focus on the provision of food, water and shelter, a very critical need of these populations –their Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR), often tend to be missed or overlooked. The relief in these situations comes through organizations involved in humanitarian response, such as IPPF Africa Region -the leading sexual and reproductive health and rights in the continent. Through our humanitarian work, we have over the years been able to address the SRHR needs of populations in crisis in the countries of Chad, Burundi, Uganda, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Central African Republic, Kenya, Ivory Coast, Tanzania, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea Conakry, Mali, Cameroon and Nigeria. In these areas, we have encountered children, adolescents, women and men who have suffered detrimental reproductive health consequences either while fleeing conflict or in the refugee camps. They have undergone sexual abuse and exploitation, intimate partner violence and other forms of gender-based violence, Sexually Transmitted Infections (including HIV), unwanted pregnancies, unsafe abortions and inadequate obstetric and maternal healthcare services. Our response has been through the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) implementation plan -implemented by our Member Associations and other collaborating partners. Through MISP, we have successfully offered quality SRHR services including family planning, maternal and child health services, HIV counselling and testing, as well as STI treatment. Further, IPPF Africa Region has pushed for the presence of skilled health workers and the availability of SRHR services in the refugee camps, offering technical assistance and training of health workers. Thousands of African lives have been saved and positively impacted through our interventions. IPPFAR honors the dedicated team of health workers involved in the humanitarian responses –including doctors, nurses, volunteers and other health workers. These individuals selflessly give their time and resources to serve the displaced and refugee populations, often working under difficult and demanding circumstances. Through their selfless sacrifice, many lives continue to be saved. Today, we celebrate these heroes. Read more about our humanitarian work in Uganda here.

IPPF humanitarian in Africa
news_item

| 05 October 2016

Leading the humanitarian response

Today is the World Humanitarian Day (WHD), which is day set aside to honor and pay tribute to aid workers who risk their lives in humanitarian service. It is also a day to mobilize people to advocate for a more humane world. In humanitarian situations arising from conflict, responses to those affected often come from different quarters, such as aid agencies, NGOs, the government and neighboring countries. But while most emergency responses focus on the provision of food, water and shelter, a very critical need of these populations –their Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR), often tend to be missed or overlooked. The relief in these situations comes through organizations involved in humanitarian response, such as IPPF Africa Region -the leading sexual and reproductive health and rights in the continent. Through our humanitarian work, we have over the years been able to address the SRHR needs of populations in crisis in the countries of Chad, Burundi, Uganda, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Central African Republic, Kenya, Ivory Coast, Tanzania, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea Conakry, Mali, Cameroon and Nigeria. In these areas, we have encountered children, adolescents, women and men who have suffered detrimental reproductive health consequences either while fleeing conflict or in the refugee camps. They have undergone sexual abuse and exploitation, intimate partner violence and other forms of gender-based violence, Sexually Transmitted Infections (including HIV), unwanted pregnancies, unsafe abortions and inadequate obstetric and maternal healthcare services. Our response has been through the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) implementation plan -implemented by our Member Associations and other collaborating partners. Through MISP, we have successfully offered quality SRHR services including family planning, maternal and child health services, HIV counselling and testing, as well as STI treatment. Further, IPPF Africa Region has pushed for the presence of skilled health workers and the availability of SRHR services in the refugee camps, offering technical assistance and training of health workers. Thousands of African lives have been saved and positively impacted through our interventions. IPPFAR honors the dedicated team of health workers involved in the humanitarian responses –including doctors, nurses, volunteers and other health workers. These individuals selflessly give their time and resources to serve the displaced and refugee populations, often working under difficult and demanding circumstances. Through their selfless sacrifice, many lives continue to be saved. Today, we celebrate these heroes. Read more about our humanitarian work in Uganda here.

African_Parliamentarians
news item

| 08 December 2016

Africa Parliamentary Forum on Population and Development (FPA) Elects New Executive Committee

24 November 2016, Dakar, Senegal The Africa Parliamentary Forum on Population and Development (FPA) held its statutory General Assembly (GA) in Dakar, Senegal on 24 November 2016. The FPA GA which is held every three years, was organized by the International Planned Parenthood Federation Liaison Office to the African Union, acting as FPA Secretariat, and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). The General Assembly was attended by 70 Members of Parliament from 30 countries including Deputy Speakers of Parliament from Benin Mali, Niger and the host country Senegal, representing the four regions of Sub- Saharan Africa (East, South, Central and West). Related: Parliamentarians are Key to Realizing Demographic Dividend in Africa Among speakers at the General Assembly included Hon. Mously Diakhate, President of the Senegalese Parliamentarian Network on Population and Development; Hon. Marie Rose Nguini Effa, Vice President of the FPA; Mr Mabingue Ngom, UNFPA WCARO Regional Director; Mr Lucien Kouakou, IPPF Africa Regional Director and Mr Sam Ntelamo, IPPF Representative to the African Union. The highlight of the General Assembly was the election of the new Executive Committee: Hon. Marie Rose Nguini Effa (Cameroon) and Hon. Paul Chibingu (Malawi) were elected respectively as President and Vice President of the forum. The following constitutes the entire membership of the new Executive Committee by sub-region. EAST AFRICA: Tanzania (Jamal Kassim Ali), Comoros (Hon Hadjira Oumouri) CENTRAL AFRICA: Hon Marie Rose Nguini Effa (Cameroon), Hon Issa Mardo Djabir (Chad) SOUTHERN AFRICA: Hon. Paul Chibingu (Malawi), Hon.  Goodlucky Kwaramba (Zimbabwe) WEST AFRICA: Hon. Mously Diakhate (Senegal) and Hon. Larry P. Younquoi (Liberia) Also Read: African Parliamentarians Discuss the Demographic Dividend Agenda Follow IPPF Africa Region on Facebook and Twitter for more updates on our work.

African_Parliamentarians
news_item

| 24 November 2016

Africa Parliamentary Forum on Population and Development (FPA) Elects New Executive Committee

24 November 2016, Dakar, Senegal The Africa Parliamentary Forum on Population and Development (FPA) held its statutory General Assembly (GA) in Dakar, Senegal on 24 November 2016. The FPA GA which is held every three years, was organized by the International Planned Parenthood Federation Liaison Office to the African Union, acting as FPA Secretariat, and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). The General Assembly was attended by 70 Members of Parliament from 30 countries including Deputy Speakers of Parliament from Benin Mali, Niger and the host country Senegal, representing the four regions of Sub- Saharan Africa (East, South, Central and West). Related: Parliamentarians are Key to Realizing Demographic Dividend in Africa Among speakers at the General Assembly included Hon. Mously Diakhate, President of the Senegalese Parliamentarian Network on Population and Development; Hon. Marie Rose Nguini Effa, Vice President of the FPA; Mr Mabingue Ngom, UNFPA WCARO Regional Director; Mr Lucien Kouakou, IPPF Africa Regional Director and Mr Sam Ntelamo, IPPF Representative to the African Union. The highlight of the General Assembly was the election of the new Executive Committee: Hon. Marie Rose Nguini Effa (Cameroon) and Hon. Paul Chibingu (Malawi) were elected respectively as President and Vice President of the forum. The following constitutes the entire membership of the new Executive Committee by sub-region. EAST AFRICA: Tanzania (Jamal Kassim Ali), Comoros (Hon Hadjira Oumouri) CENTRAL AFRICA: Hon Marie Rose Nguini Effa (Cameroon), Hon Issa Mardo Djabir (Chad) SOUTHERN AFRICA: Hon. Paul Chibingu (Malawi), Hon.  Goodlucky Kwaramba (Zimbabwe) WEST AFRICA: Hon. Mously Diakhate (Senegal) and Hon. Larry P. Younquoi (Liberia) Also Read: African Parliamentarians Discuss the Demographic Dividend Agenda Follow IPPF Africa Region on Facebook and Twitter for more updates on our work.

The delegation has so far engaged in fruitful discussions with the UNFPA Country Representative, M Saturnin Epie.
news item

| 14 November 2016

Partners Laud ATBEF for it's Significant Contribution to Togo's Development

1 November 2016, Lome, Togo Mr. Lucien Kouakou, the IPPF Africa Regional Director is currently on an Advocacy mission in Lome Togo, where he is undertaking engagements with key SRHR partners in the country, including those affiliated to the Association Togolaise pour le Bien-Etre Familial (ATBEF). ATBEF is one of IPPFAR’s 42 Member Associations. Accompanying Mr. Kouakou in his mission is Dr. Dorothy Yevide, President of the Association Béninoise pour la Planification Familiale (ABPF) representing the Regional President of IPPF, and Ms. Denise Murekatete, IPPFAR Program Advisor. The delegation has so far engaged in fruitful discussions with the UNFPA Country Representative, M Saturnin Epie. During their discussions, the IPPFAR delegation appreciated the continued collaboration between ATBEF and UNFPA, with IPPFAR pledging to strengthen this partnership through among others, the implementation of the Community-based distribution of contraceptives, including the injectable.  The IPPFAR delegation also met the President of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Togo, M. Essohouna Meba, who lauded IPPFAR for the significant contribution that ATBEF has made in Togo, more so towards the achievement of the country’s development goals. He further pledged his commitment to being ATBEF’s spokesman in the private business sector. The IPPFAR team continues its advocacy mission this week, together with the Ambassador of The Youth Action Movement –Togo chapter.  

The delegation has so far engaged in fruitful discussions with the UNFPA Country Representative, M Saturnin Epie.
news_item

| 14 November 2016

Partners Laud ATBEF for it's Significant Contribution to Togo's Development

1 November 2016, Lome, Togo Mr. Lucien Kouakou, the IPPF Africa Regional Director is currently on an Advocacy mission in Lome Togo, where he is undertaking engagements with key SRHR partners in the country, including those affiliated to the Association Togolaise pour le Bien-Etre Familial (ATBEF). ATBEF is one of IPPFAR’s 42 Member Associations. Accompanying Mr. Kouakou in his mission is Dr. Dorothy Yevide, President of the Association Béninoise pour la Planification Familiale (ABPF) representing the Regional President of IPPF, and Ms. Denise Murekatete, IPPFAR Program Advisor. The delegation has so far engaged in fruitful discussions with the UNFPA Country Representative, M Saturnin Epie. During their discussions, the IPPFAR delegation appreciated the continued collaboration between ATBEF and UNFPA, with IPPFAR pledging to strengthen this partnership through among others, the implementation of the Community-based distribution of contraceptives, including the injectable.  The IPPFAR delegation also met the President of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Togo, M. Essohouna Meba, who lauded IPPFAR for the significant contribution that ATBEF has made in Togo, more so towards the achievement of the country’s development goals. He further pledged his commitment to being ATBEF’s spokesman in the private business sector. The IPPFAR team continues its advocacy mission this week, together with the Ambassador of The Youth Action Movement –Togo chapter.  

 IPPF Director General Tewodros Melesse during an African First Ladies’ seminar
news item

| 14 November 2016

"We Must Prioritize Women's Health in Africa as the Key to Development" -Tewodros Melesse

Saturday 27 August 2016, Nairobi, Kenya The IPPF Director General, Mr. Tewodros Melesse has decried the shyness -and sometimes hypocrisy with which issues of Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) are dealt with in Africa, especially by its leaders. “When talking about development, there has always been the tendency to prioritize other issues, but not those of sexuality. Yet, conversations about Africa’s development cannot be meaningful without giving credence to reproductive health rights, and more so those pertaining to girls and women. If we fail to tackle women’s challenges in accessing quality healthcare, then we cannot make progress with regard to women’s empowerment. Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights are fundamental to women’s advancement, and women’s advancement means development for Africa. This must be recognized and prioritized by our African governments,” he said. Mr. Melesse was speaking during an African First Ladies’ seminar titled: ‘Investing in Child and Maternal Health for Social Transformation in Africa: Spotlight on Evidence Based Interventions’. The seminar was organized by the African First Ladies’ attending the sixth Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD VI). In his remarks, Mr. Melesse cited the various impediments to African women’s success, such as early marriages –which leads to many girls ending thier schooling. “With no education, this only creates fertile grounds for her poverty and that of her family. Further, when a woman has no access to family planning information and services, then she is not able to adequately space her births or have the number of desired children, and with many mouths to feed, then this becomes a great challenge for her –only enhancing her poverty status. It also becomes hard for her to gain meaningful employment or sustain a job, more so when she has to take frequent breaks from work to care for her pregnancies or young children. That is the reality, especially in the private sector,” he said. Mr. Melesse said that tackling sexual reproductive health and rights for women is one of the sure ways to elevate the status of African women. “Supporting women’s rights means that we will have more women represented in the higher echelons of power, including in Parliament. It also means that we will have more women who are able to attain a tertiary education status. It will also mean that we will have more women in the employment sector, and more women in entrepreneurship, among other sectors,” he said. Mr. Melesse also recognized some of the progress that has been made with regard to the support of Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights in the continent. “Most African governments have aligned themselves with the stipulations of the Maputo Plan of Action (MPoA), together with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This progress has to be acknowledged. However, while we have the framework, the key issue is their implementation, where African governments must honor their commitments towards Africa’s development. I must also commend Kenya’s First Lady H.E Margaret Kenyatta for her ‘Beyond Zero Campaign’, which is indeed an example of a noble initiative that can be emulated across the region, as it focuses on women’s health, and especially maternal health,” he said. Mr. Melesse reiterated the fact that health is critical to development, and women’s health is central to this. “We must not be shy to talk about sex and reproductive health. We must have these conversations that will ensure that every African child is wanted, that every African woman is healthy, and that she is a human being whose rights are respected,” he concluded. Other panelists included: Dr. Mustapha Sidiki Kaloko –African Union Commissioner for Social Affairs, Dr. Matshidiso Moeti –Regional Director, WHO Regional Office for Africa, Dr. Seth Berkley, Chief Executive Officer GAVI –the Vaccine Alliance, Ms. Katherine Perry, Country Coordinator (Kenya) U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), and a representative of Dr. Babatunde Osotimehin, Executive Director, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). The session was moderated by Ms. Julie Gichuru, Kenyan journalist and host of Africa Leadership Dialogues

 IPPF Director General Tewodros Melesse during an African First Ladies’ seminar
news_item

| 14 November 2016

"We Must Prioritize Women's Health in Africa as the Key to Development" -Tewodros Melesse

Saturday 27 August 2016, Nairobi, Kenya The IPPF Director General, Mr. Tewodros Melesse has decried the shyness -and sometimes hypocrisy with which issues of Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) are dealt with in Africa, especially by its leaders. “When talking about development, there has always been the tendency to prioritize other issues, but not those of sexuality. Yet, conversations about Africa’s development cannot be meaningful without giving credence to reproductive health rights, and more so those pertaining to girls and women. If we fail to tackle women’s challenges in accessing quality healthcare, then we cannot make progress with regard to women’s empowerment. Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights are fundamental to women’s advancement, and women’s advancement means development for Africa. This must be recognized and prioritized by our African governments,” he said. Mr. Melesse was speaking during an African First Ladies’ seminar titled: ‘Investing in Child and Maternal Health for Social Transformation in Africa: Spotlight on Evidence Based Interventions’. The seminar was organized by the African First Ladies’ attending the sixth Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD VI). In his remarks, Mr. Melesse cited the various impediments to African women’s success, such as early marriages –which leads to many girls ending thier schooling. “With no education, this only creates fertile grounds for her poverty and that of her family. Further, when a woman has no access to family planning information and services, then she is not able to adequately space her births or have the number of desired children, and with many mouths to feed, then this becomes a great challenge for her –only enhancing her poverty status. It also becomes hard for her to gain meaningful employment or sustain a job, more so when she has to take frequent breaks from work to care for her pregnancies or young children. That is the reality, especially in the private sector,” he said. Mr. Melesse said that tackling sexual reproductive health and rights for women is one of the sure ways to elevate the status of African women. “Supporting women’s rights means that we will have more women represented in the higher echelons of power, including in Parliament. It also means that we will have more women who are able to attain a tertiary education status. It will also mean that we will have more women in the employment sector, and more women in entrepreneurship, among other sectors,” he said. Mr. Melesse also recognized some of the progress that has been made with regard to the support of Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights in the continent. “Most African governments have aligned themselves with the stipulations of the Maputo Plan of Action (MPoA), together with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This progress has to be acknowledged. However, while we have the framework, the key issue is their implementation, where African governments must honor their commitments towards Africa’s development. I must also commend Kenya’s First Lady H.E Margaret Kenyatta for her ‘Beyond Zero Campaign’, which is indeed an example of a noble initiative that can be emulated across the region, as it focuses on women’s health, and especially maternal health,” he said. Mr. Melesse reiterated the fact that health is critical to development, and women’s health is central to this. “We must not be shy to talk about sex and reproductive health. We must have these conversations that will ensure that every African child is wanted, that every African woman is healthy, and that she is a human being whose rights are respected,” he concluded. Other panelists included: Dr. Mustapha Sidiki Kaloko –African Union Commissioner for Social Affairs, Dr. Matshidiso Moeti –Regional Director, WHO Regional Office for Africa, Dr. Seth Berkley, Chief Executive Officer GAVI –the Vaccine Alliance, Ms. Katherine Perry, Country Coordinator (Kenya) U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), and a representative of Dr. Babatunde Osotimehin, Executive Director, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). The session was moderated by Ms. Julie Gichuru, Kenyan journalist and host of Africa Leadership Dialogues

IPPF humanitarian in Africa
news item

| 05 October 2016

Leading the humanitarian response

Today is the World Humanitarian Day (WHD), which is day set aside to honor and pay tribute to aid workers who risk their lives in humanitarian service. It is also a day to mobilize people to advocate for a more humane world. In humanitarian situations arising from conflict, responses to those affected often come from different quarters, such as aid agencies, NGOs, the government and neighboring countries. But while most emergency responses focus on the provision of food, water and shelter, a very critical need of these populations –their Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR), often tend to be missed or overlooked. The relief in these situations comes through organizations involved in humanitarian response, such as IPPF Africa Region -the leading sexual and reproductive health and rights in the continent. Through our humanitarian work, we have over the years been able to address the SRHR needs of populations in crisis in the countries of Chad, Burundi, Uganda, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Central African Republic, Kenya, Ivory Coast, Tanzania, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea Conakry, Mali, Cameroon and Nigeria. In these areas, we have encountered children, adolescents, women and men who have suffered detrimental reproductive health consequences either while fleeing conflict or in the refugee camps. They have undergone sexual abuse and exploitation, intimate partner violence and other forms of gender-based violence, Sexually Transmitted Infections (including HIV), unwanted pregnancies, unsafe abortions and inadequate obstetric and maternal healthcare services. Our response has been through the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) implementation plan -implemented by our Member Associations and other collaborating partners. Through MISP, we have successfully offered quality SRHR services including family planning, maternal and child health services, HIV counselling and testing, as well as STI treatment. Further, IPPF Africa Region has pushed for the presence of skilled health workers and the availability of SRHR services in the refugee camps, offering technical assistance and training of health workers. Thousands of African lives have been saved and positively impacted through our interventions. IPPFAR honors the dedicated team of health workers involved in the humanitarian responses –including doctors, nurses, volunteers and other health workers. These individuals selflessly give their time and resources to serve the displaced and refugee populations, often working under difficult and demanding circumstances. Through their selfless sacrifice, many lives continue to be saved. Today, we celebrate these heroes. Read more about our humanitarian work in Uganda here.

IPPF humanitarian in Africa
news_item

| 05 October 2016

Leading the humanitarian response

Today is the World Humanitarian Day (WHD), which is day set aside to honor and pay tribute to aid workers who risk their lives in humanitarian service. It is also a day to mobilize people to advocate for a more humane world. In humanitarian situations arising from conflict, responses to those affected often come from different quarters, such as aid agencies, NGOs, the government and neighboring countries. But while most emergency responses focus on the provision of food, water and shelter, a very critical need of these populations –their Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR), often tend to be missed or overlooked. The relief in these situations comes through organizations involved in humanitarian response, such as IPPF Africa Region -the leading sexual and reproductive health and rights in the continent. Through our humanitarian work, we have over the years been able to address the SRHR needs of populations in crisis in the countries of Chad, Burundi, Uganda, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Central African Republic, Kenya, Ivory Coast, Tanzania, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea Conakry, Mali, Cameroon and Nigeria. In these areas, we have encountered children, adolescents, women and men who have suffered detrimental reproductive health consequences either while fleeing conflict or in the refugee camps. They have undergone sexual abuse and exploitation, intimate partner violence and other forms of gender-based violence, Sexually Transmitted Infections (including HIV), unwanted pregnancies, unsafe abortions and inadequate obstetric and maternal healthcare services. Our response has been through the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) implementation plan -implemented by our Member Associations and other collaborating partners. Through MISP, we have successfully offered quality SRHR services including family planning, maternal and child health services, HIV counselling and testing, as well as STI treatment. Further, IPPF Africa Region has pushed for the presence of skilled health workers and the availability of SRHR services in the refugee camps, offering technical assistance and training of health workers. Thousands of African lives have been saved and positively impacted through our interventions. IPPFAR honors the dedicated team of health workers involved in the humanitarian responses –including doctors, nurses, volunteers and other health workers. These individuals selflessly give their time and resources to serve the displaced and refugee populations, often working under difficult and demanding circumstances. Through their selfless sacrifice, many lives continue to be saved. Today, we celebrate these heroes. Read more about our humanitarian work in Uganda here.