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Guinea: Act now to ensure greater support and assistance for survivors of sexual violence

27 September 2022

New report calls on Guinean authorities to improve prevention from rape and care for survivors Authorities must introduce new law on gender-based violence   Over 400 complaints for rape were registered in 2021, most of survivors were minors
IPPF New strategy launch
media center

| 26 November 2022

IPPF Adopts New Strategy as it Celebrates its 70th Birthday

The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), the world’s largest sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) organization, is celebrating its 70th birthday by embracing a new and bold global strategy. The International Planned Parenthood Federation was founded on 24th November 1952 in an act of international solidarity between eight national family planning organizations[i]. Now a network of more than 108 independent Member Associations (MAs) working in over 140 countries worldwide, the last 70 years have seen IPPF leave its mark on the world, delivering high-quality SRHR services and helping transform laws and policies across the globe. But facing a changing and challenging global landscape, IPPF heralds its 70th Birthday with a renewed strategic vision. More than 300 members from IPPF MAs affirmed the new six-year strategy - Come Together - at its General Assembly in the Colombian capital, Bogota, committing to building a future where more people in more places have what they need to enjoy their rights to sexual and reproductive dignity and well-being. Working in six regions across the globe, IPPF is prioritizing the Americas and the Caribbean due to the challenges it faces, investing 25% of its resources through its new regional office. The region has the second highest number of adolescent pregnancies, with 63 unintended pregnancies per 1,000 girls between 15 and 19[ii], mainly among those with little or no access to essential sexual and reproductive health services or educational opportunities. Kate Gilmore, Chair of the International Planned Parenthood Federation’s Board of Trustees, said: “Our bold ‘Come Together’ strategy affirms that human rights for all are the very heart of our Federation. Our new strategy commits us to urgent and purposeful human rights action so that, through our healthcare, information, and advocacy, millions more have what they need to live and love free from fear, discrimination and exclusion. “There are tough challenges to be met: political attacks on sexual and reproductive rights; deepening inequalities of poverty, racism, sexism and homophobia; armed conflict, intimate violence; structural injustices as well as the climate crisis. Those wrongs undermine the rights of billions across the globe, including sexual and reproductive rights. “IPPF will stand up for and with those denied dignity in their sexual and reproductive lives. Around the globe, we will strengthen our work in solidarity with local communities to better realize sexual and reproductive rights for all and stand up together against those who peddle bigotry, dismantle protections, and promote exclusions.” The new strategy sets out an ambitious programme of work over the next five years and provides a compelling focus on revitalizing the Federation. It is accompanied by an Anti-Racism Declaration of Intent, a statement of public accountability to continue working to dismantle racism internally and externally. The Secretariat and MAs – will commit to a fully inclusive and respectful Federation that offers equal chances for all, ensuring that IPPF emerges unambiguously as an anti-racist organization. IPPF’s General Assembly also marks the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women on Friday, 25th November 2022. Dr Alvaro Bermejo, Director-General of the International Planned Parenthood Federation, said: “Over the last few years, we have seen the devastating consequences of political, social and economic turmoil on women and girls’ bodies, with deepening inequalities exacerbated by environmental destruction and continued humanitarian crises. “It is also no secret that we are experiencing growing threats from a sinister opposition actively attacking people’s sexual and reproductive rights and freedoms alongside reduced funding and commitments from global leaders. “IPPF will continue to evolve and transform, so we can stand up forcefully and fearlessly to support those who are excluded, locked out and left behind, in particular youth and the most marginalized. Through our new strategy, Member Associations, the lifeblood of the Federation, will help millions more enjoy their sexual and reproductive health, rights and freedoms. “Turning 70 is also a time for IPPF to embody the change it wants to be. Over the next six years, we will build the Federation from the inside out, re-examining and affirming our values and spring-boarding off the Anti-Racism Declaration of Intent with open and fearless dialogue and action to address colonial legacies within IPPF.” What IPPF will do IPPF’s very existence manifests just how universal the demand for sexual and reproductive health and rights is, with MAs delivering more than 1 billion cumulative[iii] services between 2016 and 2022, including contraceptive services, STI treatments, abortion care, maternal health services and much more. IPPF’s humanitarian reach has also grown exponentially, with IPPF providing sexual and reproductive health services to over 6 million people in acute humanitarian and fragile settings in 2021. But, with the number of women with an unmet need for family planning sitting at 163 million[iv], the current trajectory to close the gender gap worldwide on course to take 135.6[v] years and 274[vi] million people needing humanitarian assistance in 2022 – a 39[vii] million increase from 2021, there is much more to do. To increase its impact and reach, IPPF is committing to bold and catalytic transformation driven by young people. To broaden access to enjoyment of sexual and reproductive health and rights, IPPF’s new strategy sets up four central pillars: Centre care on people. IPPF will provide high-quality person-centred care to more people in more places. Move the sexuality agenda. IPPF will push for the societal and legislative change needed to make universal sexual and reproductive rights a reality for more. Solidarity for change. IPPF will build bridges to other movements, sectors, and communities wherever sexual and reproductive health and rights can also help advance other human rights causes. Nurture our Federation. IPPF will make its core values more explicit and apply their implications across the Federation more comprehensively to unleash stronger collective power for deeper global solidarity that can deliver greater impact. How IPPF will do it The Federation will focus its resources on excluded and marginalized people. It will walk shoulder to shoulder with those young people, individuals and communities bearing the full brunt of stigma and prejudice. At each step, IPPF will defend, protect, and celebrate safety, pleasure and well-being in sex and reproduction. IPPF will also work with governments to help shape laws, policies and norms, including through feminist action and international solidarity, and by working to remove restrictions that infringe on dignity, choice, and well-being. At every turn, IPPF will denounce powers and authorities who, through policy, practice, and law, undermine human rights in the intimate domains of sex and reproduction. With IPPF’s work deeply intertwined with broader struggles for human rights, anti-racist movements and movements for climate survival, social justice and equality, IPPF will also foster global solidarity by coming together with like-minded sectors and actors to help transform lives, communities and countries. Throughout, IPPF will be accountable for what it does, how it does it, and whose lives it affects. To accelerate its anti-racism agenda, IPPF will extend an Anti-Racism Declaration of Intent across the Federation, strengthening belonging and accountability for and to all its members and ensuring fair and equitable systems are in place to deliver the action and meaningful change to which it is committed.   For media enquiries, please contact Karmen Ivey on [email protected] or [email protected]   About the International Planned Parenthood Federation The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) is a global service provider and advocate of sexual and reproductive health and rights for all.   For 70 years, IPPF, through its 108 Member Associations and 7 partners, has delivered high-quality sexual and reproductive healthcare and helped advance sexual rights, especially for people with intersectional and diverse needs that are currently unmet. Our Member Associations and partners are independent organizations that are locally owned, which means the support and care they provide is informed by local expertise and context. We advocate for a world where people are provided with the information they need to make informed decisions about their sexual health and bodies. We stand up and fight for sexual and reproductive rights and against those who seek to deny people their human right to bodily autonomy and freedom. We deliver care that is rooted in rights, respect, and dignity - no matter what. [i]  The International Planned Parenthood Federation was founded on the 24th of November 1952 as an act of international solidarity between eight national family planning organizations in Germany, Hong Kong, India, Netherlands, Singapore, Sweden, UK, and USA. [ii] https://www.unfpa.org/data/CO [iii] https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(22)00936-9/fulltext [iv] UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, “Family Planning and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”: https://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/publications/pdf/family/familyPlanning_DataBooklet_2019.pdf [v] World Economic Forum, Global Gender Gap Report 2021: https://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_GGGR_2021.pdf [vi] UNOCHA Global Humanitarian Overview 2022 (Abridged Report): Global Humanitarian Overview 2022 (Abridged Report) - World | ReliefWeb [vii]Ibid

IPPF New strategy launch
media_center

| 28 November 2022

IPPF Adopts New Strategy as it Celebrates its 70th Birthday

The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), the world’s largest sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) organization, is celebrating its 70th birthday by embracing a new and bold global strategy. The International Planned Parenthood Federation was founded on 24th November 1952 in an act of international solidarity between eight national family planning organizations[i]. Now a network of more than 108 independent Member Associations (MAs) working in over 140 countries worldwide, the last 70 years have seen IPPF leave its mark on the world, delivering high-quality SRHR services and helping transform laws and policies across the globe. But facing a changing and challenging global landscape, IPPF heralds its 70th Birthday with a renewed strategic vision. More than 300 members from IPPF MAs affirmed the new six-year strategy - Come Together - at its General Assembly in the Colombian capital, Bogota, committing to building a future where more people in more places have what they need to enjoy their rights to sexual and reproductive dignity and well-being. Working in six regions across the globe, IPPF is prioritizing the Americas and the Caribbean due to the challenges it faces, investing 25% of its resources through its new regional office. The region has the second highest number of adolescent pregnancies, with 63 unintended pregnancies per 1,000 girls between 15 and 19[ii], mainly among those with little or no access to essential sexual and reproductive health services or educational opportunities. Kate Gilmore, Chair of the International Planned Parenthood Federation’s Board of Trustees, said: “Our bold ‘Come Together’ strategy affirms that human rights for all are the very heart of our Federation. Our new strategy commits us to urgent and purposeful human rights action so that, through our healthcare, information, and advocacy, millions more have what they need to live and love free from fear, discrimination and exclusion. “There are tough challenges to be met: political attacks on sexual and reproductive rights; deepening inequalities of poverty, racism, sexism and homophobia; armed conflict, intimate violence; structural injustices as well as the climate crisis. Those wrongs undermine the rights of billions across the globe, including sexual and reproductive rights. “IPPF will stand up for and with those denied dignity in their sexual and reproductive lives. Around the globe, we will strengthen our work in solidarity with local communities to better realize sexual and reproductive rights for all and stand up together against those who peddle bigotry, dismantle protections, and promote exclusions.” The new strategy sets out an ambitious programme of work over the next five years and provides a compelling focus on revitalizing the Federation. It is accompanied by an Anti-Racism Declaration of Intent, a statement of public accountability to continue working to dismantle racism internally and externally. The Secretariat and MAs – will commit to a fully inclusive and respectful Federation that offers equal chances for all, ensuring that IPPF emerges unambiguously as an anti-racist organization. IPPF’s General Assembly also marks the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women on Friday, 25th November 2022. Dr Alvaro Bermejo, Director-General of the International Planned Parenthood Federation, said: “Over the last few years, we have seen the devastating consequences of political, social and economic turmoil on women and girls’ bodies, with deepening inequalities exacerbated by environmental destruction and continued humanitarian crises. “It is also no secret that we are experiencing growing threats from a sinister opposition actively attacking people’s sexual and reproductive rights and freedoms alongside reduced funding and commitments from global leaders. “IPPF will continue to evolve and transform, so we can stand up forcefully and fearlessly to support those who are excluded, locked out and left behind, in particular youth and the most marginalized. Through our new strategy, Member Associations, the lifeblood of the Federation, will help millions more enjoy their sexual and reproductive health, rights and freedoms. “Turning 70 is also a time for IPPF to embody the change it wants to be. Over the next six years, we will build the Federation from the inside out, re-examining and affirming our values and spring-boarding off the Anti-Racism Declaration of Intent with open and fearless dialogue and action to address colonial legacies within IPPF.” What IPPF will do IPPF’s very existence manifests just how universal the demand for sexual and reproductive health and rights is, with MAs delivering more than 1 billion cumulative[iii] services between 2016 and 2022, including contraceptive services, STI treatments, abortion care, maternal health services and much more. IPPF’s humanitarian reach has also grown exponentially, with IPPF providing sexual and reproductive health services to over 6 million people in acute humanitarian and fragile settings in 2021. But, with the number of women with an unmet need for family planning sitting at 163 million[iv], the current trajectory to close the gender gap worldwide on course to take 135.6[v] years and 274[vi] million people needing humanitarian assistance in 2022 – a 39[vii] million increase from 2021, there is much more to do. To increase its impact and reach, IPPF is committing to bold and catalytic transformation driven by young people. To broaden access to enjoyment of sexual and reproductive health and rights, IPPF’s new strategy sets up four central pillars: Centre care on people. IPPF will provide high-quality person-centred care to more people in more places. Move the sexuality agenda. IPPF will push for the societal and legislative change needed to make universal sexual and reproductive rights a reality for more. Solidarity for change. IPPF will build bridges to other movements, sectors, and communities wherever sexual and reproductive health and rights can also help advance other human rights causes. Nurture our Federation. IPPF will make its core values more explicit and apply their implications across the Federation more comprehensively to unleash stronger collective power for deeper global solidarity that can deliver greater impact. How IPPF will do it The Federation will focus its resources on excluded and marginalized people. It will walk shoulder to shoulder with those young people, individuals and communities bearing the full brunt of stigma and prejudice. At each step, IPPF will defend, protect, and celebrate safety, pleasure and well-being in sex and reproduction. IPPF will also work with governments to help shape laws, policies and norms, including through feminist action and international solidarity, and by working to remove restrictions that infringe on dignity, choice, and well-being. At every turn, IPPF will denounce powers and authorities who, through policy, practice, and law, undermine human rights in the intimate domains of sex and reproduction. With IPPF’s work deeply intertwined with broader struggles for human rights, anti-racist movements and movements for climate survival, social justice and equality, IPPF will also foster global solidarity by coming together with like-minded sectors and actors to help transform lives, communities and countries. Throughout, IPPF will be accountable for what it does, how it does it, and whose lives it affects. To accelerate its anti-racism agenda, IPPF will extend an Anti-Racism Declaration of Intent across the Federation, strengthening belonging and accountability for and to all its members and ensuring fair and equitable systems are in place to deliver the action and meaningful change to which it is committed.   For media enquiries, please contact Karmen Ivey on [email protected] or [email protected]   About the International Planned Parenthood Federation The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) is a global service provider and advocate of sexual and reproductive health and rights for all.   For 70 years, IPPF, through its 108 Member Associations and 7 partners, has delivered high-quality sexual and reproductive healthcare and helped advance sexual rights, especially for people with intersectional and diverse needs that are currently unmet. Our Member Associations and partners are independent organizations that are locally owned, which means the support and care they provide is informed by local expertise and context. We advocate for a world where people are provided with the information they need to make informed decisions about their sexual health and bodies. We stand up and fight for sexual and reproductive rights and against those who seek to deny people their human right to bodily autonomy and freedom. We deliver care that is rooted in rights, respect, and dignity - no matter what. [i]  The International Planned Parenthood Federation was founded on the 24th of November 1952 as an act of international solidarity between eight national family planning organizations in Germany, Hong Kong, India, Netherlands, Singapore, Sweden, UK, and USA. [ii] https://www.unfpa.org/data/CO [iii] https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(22)00936-9/fulltext [iv] UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, “Family Planning and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”: https://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/publications/pdf/family/familyPlanning_DataBooklet_2019.pdf [v] World Economic Forum, Global Gender Gap Report 2021: https://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_GGGR_2021.pdf [vi] UNOCHA Global Humanitarian Overview 2022 (Abridged Report): Global Humanitarian Overview 2022 (Abridged Report) - World | ReliefWeb [vii]Ibid

Benin news in NY Time
media center

| 22 November 2022

The New York Times article: A Year After Widening Abortion Access, Benin Sees Fewer Botched Ones

Benin news in NY Time
media_center

| 28 November 2022

The New York Times article: A Year After Widening Abortion Access, Benin Sees Fewer Botched Ones

Abidjan launch 1
media center

| 16 November 2022

IPPF West And Central Africa Sub Office launch event

The Africa Regional Office of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (#IPPF) gathered from 17 to 22 October in Abidjan, all the Executive Directors and Presidents of the Youth Action Movements (YAMs) of its Member Associations in West and Central Africa (Francophone, Anglophone and Lusophone) as part of the launch of its new sub-office for West and Central Africa. Watch the highlights of this event here: Abidjan Sub Office Launch Photo Album and on the below video.  

Abidjan launch 1
media_center

| 28 November 2022

IPPF West And Central Africa Sub Office launch event

The Africa Regional Office of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (#IPPF) gathered from 17 to 22 October in Abidjan, all the Executive Directors and Presidents of the Youth Action Movements (YAMs) of its Member Associations in West and Central Africa (Francophone, Anglophone and Lusophone) as part of the launch of its new sub-office for West and Central Africa. Watch the highlights of this event here: Abidjan Sub Office Launch Photo Album and on the below video.  

Guinea Report
media center

| 27 September 2022

Guinea: Act now to ensure greater support and assistance for survivors of sexual violence

New report calls on Guinean authorities to improve prevention from rape and care for survivors Authorities must introduce new law on gender-based violence   Over 400 complaints for rape were registered in 2021, most of survivors were minors Amnesty and IPPFAR denounce barriers to justice for victims leading to impunity Victims of sexual violence in Guinea face social stigmatization, a lack of accessible medical care and serious barriers to justice, said Amnesty International and the International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) today in a new report ‘Shame must change sides, ensuring rights and justice for victims of sexual violence in Guinea’. Based on interviews with survivors of rape, administrative, judicial, traditional, and religious authorities, health care professionals, diplomats, civil society representatives, the report analyses the numerous obstacles to effective care for victims of rape, forensic examination, psychological support, and access to justice in Guinea. For many survivors, justice remains unattainable.  "Victims and their families have repeatedly told us that the horrendous sexual violence they experienced is compounded by societal judgement, but silence is starting to break on rape cases and civil society is moving to denounce sexual violence,” said Samira Daoud, Amnesty International's Regional Director for West and Central Africa. “Despite recent efforts by the authorities to tackle the issue of sexual violence, many remains to be done in terms of information, prevention, access to care and justice to respect Guinea's obligations under international and regional human rights laws.” In 2021, the Office for the Protection of Gender, Children and Morals (Oprogem) and the Special Brigade for the Protection of Vulnerable Persons (BSPPV) - specialized units within the police and the gendarmerie- dealt with more than 400 cases of rape, and most of the victims were minors, some of whom are under 13.  This report shows that the real figures of rape cases are undoubtedly higher, considering notably the practice of extrajudicial settlement and the higher number of cases treated in medical centres. Social stigmatization Victims of sexual violence and their families often face intense judgement in their communities amid widespread social stigmatization. The mother of a girl who said she was raped told Amnesty International about the stigma her child experienced: “[…] When we went to the hospital, one of the doctors said: ‘This is the little girl who was raped’. It hurts. Everywhere she goes, people point at her. She is always locked up in the house. She doesn't go out; she hardly communicates with people. She wants to go back to school but it's not possible." More efforts should be done by the authorities to develop awareness and education campaigns to address the underlying social and cultural attitudes that discriminate against women and facilitate and perpetuate violence against them. These campaigns should promote zero tolerance for violence against women, debunk harmful gender stereotypes and myths associated with rape, eliminate the stigma associated with women victims of violence, and encourage victims to seek redress. Urgent need to improve access to care, sexual and reproductive rights and psychological support Guinea lacks an effective toll-free number enabling victims to report sexual violence and to receive medical and legal advice. And despite some initiatives like the creation of one-stop centres offering care and legal support, the availability, quality, and accessibility of the health system must be strengthened for victims, often of modest economic status. Many survivors are unable to access effective medical and psychological care or realise their right to sexual and reproductive health. Most medical specialist practice in the capital city Conakry and the cost of care can sometimes prevent victims from seeking treatment. A doctor said to Amnesty International: “We can provide free consultations and reports. But if people have complications that require surgery, or infectious complications that require medication, we can't do that for free.” “The social stigma associated with rape in Guinea, which often leads to not reporting the crime and not filing complaints, leaves survivors of these atrocities without access to medical care and psychosocial support as well as legal aid to access justice and redress”, said Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry, IPPFAR Regional Director. “Gender based violence in all its forms is recognised as a human rights violation by the international human rights framework and jurisprudence. Gender inequality, power imbalance and lack of respect for human rights are often the root causes of such heinous acts and prevents survivors from accessing and enjoying their full sexual and reproductive health and rights. As human rights defenders, we must all take a stand and put a stop to these inexcusable acts”, added Petrus-Barry. Accessing justice is an obstacle course for victims Despite achieving real progress by adjusting legal frameworks in recent years and developing specialized police and gendarmerie units to respond to sexual violence cases, gaining access to justice in Guinea remains a challenging obstacle course for victims of sexual violence, while perpetrators often enjoy impunity. Customary authorities have been able to push for out of court settlements leading to prosecutions being dropped, which is against the law and against the rights of the survivors. Although there is lack of forensic specialists and the presentation of a medico-legal certificate is not a legal condition for filing a complaint, in practice it is often required. And even when this document is not required by the police or the gendarmerie, its absence becomes a major obstacle to a possible conviction in court. Judicial investigations are often hampered by a lack of resources and training in addressing and investigating sexual violence, which negatively impacts victims’ quest for justice. In the absence of effective free legal assistance for those unable to afford a lawyer, only NGOs are able to provide legal support. Similarly, Guinea’s justice system also lacks resources. The majority of judges, most of whom are men, work in poor conditions. The report of rapes survivors highlights that some of them perpetuate patriarchal stereotypes while handling sexual violence cases. Furthermore, the fact that the survivors of the 28 September 2009 massacre had to wait 13 years to finally hope for justice and reparation was a powerful symbol of impunity; while the defence and security forces killed more than 150 demonstrators and committed sexual crimes against more than 100 women in a stadium in Conakry that day.   To strengthen their response to sexual violence, the Guinean authorities must urgently pass a comprehensive law on gender-based violence, among other recommendations highlighted in the report to strengthen the capacity of the judiciary, police and other law enforcement authorities, and social and health workers, to ensure full implementation of legal provisions aimed at addressing violence against women.   “Guinean authorities promised that they would fight gender-based violence and rape.  We urge them to take concrete steps to strengthen state efforts to prevent sexual violence, and guarantee care and justice for survivors,” said Samira Daoud. For further information or to request an interview, please contact: -Ousmane DRABO, Media Manager at Amnesty International’s West and Central Africa region office- email: [email protected] / Mob: +221 776234040 or [email protected] -Mahmoud GARGA, Lead Specialist - Strategic Communication, Media Relations and Digital Campaigning, IPPF Africa Regional Office (IPPFARO) – email: [email protected] / Tel: +254 704 626 920   ABOUT IPPF AFRICA REGION (IPPFAR) The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is one of the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organization in Africa, and a leading sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy voice in the region. Headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, the overarching goal of IPPFAR is to increase access to SRHR services to the most vulnerable youth, men and women in sub-Saharan Africa. Supported by thousands of volunteers, IPPFAR tackles the continent’s growing SRHR challenges through a network of Member Associations (MAs) in 40 countries. We do this by developing our MAs into efficient entities with the capacity to deliver and sustain high quality, youth focused and gender sensitive services. We work with Governments, the African Union, Regional Economic Commissions, the Pan-African Parliament, United Nations bodies among others to expand political and financial commitments to sexual and reproductive health and rights in Africa. Learn more about us on our website. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

Guinea Report
media_center

| 28 November 2022

Guinea: Act now to ensure greater support and assistance for survivors of sexual violence

New report calls on Guinean authorities to improve prevention from rape and care for survivors Authorities must introduce new law on gender-based violence   Over 400 complaints for rape were registered in 2021, most of survivors were minors Amnesty and IPPFAR denounce barriers to justice for victims leading to impunity Victims of sexual violence in Guinea face social stigmatization, a lack of accessible medical care and serious barriers to justice, said Amnesty International and the International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) today in a new report ‘Shame must change sides, ensuring rights and justice for victims of sexual violence in Guinea’. Based on interviews with survivors of rape, administrative, judicial, traditional, and religious authorities, health care professionals, diplomats, civil society representatives, the report analyses the numerous obstacles to effective care for victims of rape, forensic examination, psychological support, and access to justice in Guinea. For many survivors, justice remains unattainable.  "Victims and their families have repeatedly told us that the horrendous sexual violence they experienced is compounded by societal judgement, but silence is starting to break on rape cases and civil society is moving to denounce sexual violence,” said Samira Daoud, Amnesty International's Regional Director for West and Central Africa. “Despite recent efforts by the authorities to tackle the issue of sexual violence, many remains to be done in terms of information, prevention, access to care and justice to respect Guinea's obligations under international and regional human rights laws.” In 2021, the Office for the Protection of Gender, Children and Morals (Oprogem) and the Special Brigade for the Protection of Vulnerable Persons (BSPPV) - specialized units within the police and the gendarmerie- dealt with more than 400 cases of rape, and most of the victims were minors, some of whom are under 13.  This report shows that the real figures of rape cases are undoubtedly higher, considering notably the practice of extrajudicial settlement and the higher number of cases treated in medical centres. Social stigmatization Victims of sexual violence and their families often face intense judgement in their communities amid widespread social stigmatization. The mother of a girl who said she was raped told Amnesty International about the stigma her child experienced: “[…] When we went to the hospital, one of the doctors said: ‘This is the little girl who was raped’. It hurts. Everywhere she goes, people point at her. She is always locked up in the house. She doesn't go out; she hardly communicates with people. She wants to go back to school but it's not possible." More efforts should be done by the authorities to develop awareness and education campaigns to address the underlying social and cultural attitudes that discriminate against women and facilitate and perpetuate violence against them. These campaigns should promote zero tolerance for violence against women, debunk harmful gender stereotypes and myths associated with rape, eliminate the stigma associated with women victims of violence, and encourage victims to seek redress. Urgent need to improve access to care, sexual and reproductive rights and psychological support Guinea lacks an effective toll-free number enabling victims to report sexual violence and to receive medical and legal advice. And despite some initiatives like the creation of one-stop centres offering care and legal support, the availability, quality, and accessibility of the health system must be strengthened for victims, often of modest economic status. Many survivors are unable to access effective medical and psychological care or realise their right to sexual and reproductive health. Most medical specialist practice in the capital city Conakry and the cost of care can sometimes prevent victims from seeking treatment. A doctor said to Amnesty International: “We can provide free consultations and reports. But if people have complications that require surgery, or infectious complications that require medication, we can't do that for free.” “The social stigma associated with rape in Guinea, which often leads to not reporting the crime and not filing complaints, leaves survivors of these atrocities without access to medical care and psychosocial support as well as legal aid to access justice and redress”, said Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry, IPPFAR Regional Director. “Gender based violence in all its forms is recognised as a human rights violation by the international human rights framework and jurisprudence. Gender inequality, power imbalance and lack of respect for human rights are often the root causes of such heinous acts and prevents survivors from accessing and enjoying their full sexual and reproductive health and rights. As human rights defenders, we must all take a stand and put a stop to these inexcusable acts”, added Petrus-Barry. Accessing justice is an obstacle course for victims Despite achieving real progress by adjusting legal frameworks in recent years and developing specialized police and gendarmerie units to respond to sexual violence cases, gaining access to justice in Guinea remains a challenging obstacle course for victims of sexual violence, while perpetrators often enjoy impunity. Customary authorities have been able to push for out of court settlements leading to prosecutions being dropped, which is against the law and against the rights of the survivors. Although there is lack of forensic specialists and the presentation of a medico-legal certificate is not a legal condition for filing a complaint, in practice it is often required. And even when this document is not required by the police or the gendarmerie, its absence becomes a major obstacle to a possible conviction in court. Judicial investigations are often hampered by a lack of resources and training in addressing and investigating sexual violence, which negatively impacts victims’ quest for justice. In the absence of effective free legal assistance for those unable to afford a lawyer, only NGOs are able to provide legal support. Similarly, Guinea’s justice system also lacks resources. The majority of judges, most of whom are men, work in poor conditions. The report of rapes survivors highlights that some of them perpetuate patriarchal stereotypes while handling sexual violence cases. Furthermore, the fact that the survivors of the 28 September 2009 massacre had to wait 13 years to finally hope for justice and reparation was a powerful symbol of impunity; while the defence and security forces killed more than 150 demonstrators and committed sexual crimes against more than 100 women in a stadium in Conakry that day.   To strengthen their response to sexual violence, the Guinean authorities must urgently pass a comprehensive law on gender-based violence, among other recommendations highlighted in the report to strengthen the capacity of the judiciary, police and other law enforcement authorities, and social and health workers, to ensure full implementation of legal provisions aimed at addressing violence against women.   “Guinean authorities promised that they would fight gender-based violence and rape.  We urge them to take concrete steps to strengthen state efforts to prevent sexual violence, and guarantee care and justice for survivors,” said Samira Daoud. For further information or to request an interview, please contact: -Ousmane DRABO, Media Manager at Amnesty International’s West and Central Africa region office- email: [email protected] / Mob: +221 776234040 or [email protected] -Mahmoud GARGA, Lead Specialist - Strategic Communication, Media Relations and Digital Campaigning, IPPF Africa Regional Office (IPPFARO) – email: [email protected] / Tel: +254 704 626 920   ABOUT IPPF AFRICA REGION (IPPFAR) The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is one of the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organization in Africa, and a leading sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy voice in the region. Headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, the overarching goal of IPPFAR is to increase access to SRHR services to the most vulnerable youth, men and women in sub-Saharan Africa. Supported by thousands of volunteers, IPPFAR tackles the continent’s growing SRHR challenges through a network of Member Associations (MAs) in 40 countries. We do this by developing our MAs into efficient entities with the capacity to deliver and sustain high quality, youth focused and gender sensitive services. We work with Governments, the African Union, Regional Economic Commissions, the Pan-African Parliament, United Nations bodies among others to expand political and financial commitments to sexual and reproductive health and rights in Africa. Learn more about us on our website. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

Safe abortion course
media center

| 20 September 2022

IPPF launches free online medical abortion course

Training co-created with How To Use Abortion Pill Training endorsed by the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Training course complete with quizzes and an option to download a certificate upon successful completion Course comes as World Health Organisation (WHO) issues new guidelines on abortion care and will help put the WHO guidelines into practice globally Over 25 million unsafe abortions occur each year From 2015 to 2019 in Kenya, there were 2,380,000 pregnancies annually. Of these, 1,450,000 pregnancies were unintended and 551,000 ended in abortion Landmark High Court of Kenya ruling in March 2022 affirms abortion care as a fundamental right under the Constitution of Kenya Nairobi – 20th September 2022 – International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) and HowToUseAbortionPill.org have developed a free online medical abortion training course to equip healthcare workers with the necessary skills to provide care for women seeking medical abortion up to 13 weeks’ gestation. The course is aimed at the full range of providers, including physicians, midwives, pharmacists, medical students and community health workers. The course, which has been endorsed by the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO), is a seven-lesson video series accessible via the link https://elearning.howtouseabortionpill.org. It covers an overview of abortion care; how to support a medical abortion; symptoms, side effects and complications; and aftercare. The training is framed around four principles of care: person-centred care, rights-based care, quality, and privacy and confidentiality. “Abortion care continues to be left off medical training curriculums,” said Mallah Tabot, Lead SRHR Programming at IPPF Africa Region. “This online course will fill a critical gap in the education of many health workers. It has the potential to significantly increase the number of health workers with the skills and knowledge to provide abortion care, especially in low-resource settings, and thereby increase the number of women supported to safely end a pregnancy.” Unsafe abortion remains a serious global threat to women's health and safety, causing an estimated 7 million hospitalizations and up to 13% of all maternal deaths worldwide each year. Medical abortion is a non-invasive method using two pills - mifepristone and misoprostol - or misoprostol alone.  Medical abortion is safe and effective and is recommended by the Word Health Organisation (WHO). Between 2015 and 2019 in Kenya, there were a total of 2,380,000 pregnancies annually. Of these, 1,450,000 pregnancies were unintended and 551,000 ended in abortion. in Nigeria, there were a total of 10,500,000 pregnancies annually with 2,990,000 unintended and 1,430,000 ended in abortion. In both countries, abortion is legal to preserve the pregnant person’s health. However, a majority of abortions are carried out by unqualified practitioners who run unsafe clinics. “Research shows that when women cannot access safe abortion care, they often seek unsafe methods,”  said Rebecca Wilkins, Technical Lead, Abortion at IPPF.  “This training course provides the information and resources necessary for health workers to support women who choose to have a safe abortion with pills in early pregnancy either within or outside a clinical setting.” The course is hosted on a login-based web portal which can be accessed from desktop or mobile and is structured to be an interactive learning experience, complete with quizzes and an option to download a certificate upon successful completion. In March this year, WHO issued new guidelines on abortion care.  The updated guidelines contain more than 50 recommendations covering clinical practice, health service delivery, and policy and legal actions including ensuring access to quality medical abortion pills. The new online training course is aligned to the clinical protocols recommended in the WHO guidelines. A landmark ruling by the High Court of Kenya in Malindi this year affirmed the right to abortion as a fundamental right under the Kenyan Constitution.  The ruling in a case filed by the Center for Reproductive Rights and Reproductive Health Network Kenya (RHNK) in 2020 against government officials involved the arrest of a minor and a clinician. It has set a precedent against arbitrary arrests and prosecution of patients and health care providers for seeking or offering abortion services. Such arrests and prosecutions are now deemed illegal according to the new ruling. ENDs  For further information, download the media kit HERE or contact: PR Consultant Njeri Wangari              Tel: +254 (0)722353657, e-mail: [email protected] IPPF: Mahmoud Garga                     Tel.   +254 (0) 704626920, e-mail: [email protected]    Catherine Kilfedder                                                         e-mail: [email protected]   ABOUT IPPF AFRICA REGION (IPPFAR) The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is one of the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organizations in Africa and a leading sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy voice in the region. Headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, the overarching goal of IPPFAR is to increase access to SRHR services to the most vulnerable youth, men and women, in sub-Saharan Africa.  Supported by thousands of volunteers, IPPFAR tackles the continent's growing SRHR challenges through a network of Member Associations (MAs) in 40 countries. We do this by developing our MAs into efficient entities with the capacity to deliver and sustain high-quality, youth-focused and gender-sensitive services.  We work with Governments, the African Union, Regional Economic Commissions, the Pan-African Parliament, and United Nations bodies, among others, to expand political and financial commitments to sexual and reproductive health and rights in Africa.  Learn more about us on our website. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

Safe abortion course
media_center

| 29 November 2022

IPPF launches free online medical abortion course

Training co-created with How To Use Abortion Pill Training endorsed by the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Training course complete with quizzes and an option to download a certificate upon successful completion Course comes as World Health Organisation (WHO) issues new guidelines on abortion care and will help put the WHO guidelines into practice globally Over 25 million unsafe abortions occur each year From 2015 to 2019 in Kenya, there were 2,380,000 pregnancies annually. Of these, 1,450,000 pregnancies were unintended and 551,000 ended in abortion Landmark High Court of Kenya ruling in March 2022 affirms abortion care as a fundamental right under the Constitution of Kenya Nairobi – 20th September 2022 – International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) and HowToUseAbortionPill.org have developed a free online medical abortion training course to equip healthcare workers with the necessary skills to provide care for women seeking medical abortion up to 13 weeks’ gestation. The course is aimed at the full range of providers, including physicians, midwives, pharmacists, medical students and community health workers. The course, which has been endorsed by the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO), is a seven-lesson video series accessible via the link https://elearning.howtouseabortionpill.org. It covers an overview of abortion care; how to support a medical abortion; symptoms, side effects and complications; and aftercare. The training is framed around four principles of care: person-centred care, rights-based care, quality, and privacy and confidentiality. “Abortion care continues to be left off medical training curriculums,” said Mallah Tabot, Lead SRHR Programming at IPPF Africa Region. “This online course will fill a critical gap in the education of many health workers. It has the potential to significantly increase the number of health workers with the skills and knowledge to provide abortion care, especially in low-resource settings, and thereby increase the number of women supported to safely end a pregnancy.” Unsafe abortion remains a serious global threat to women's health and safety, causing an estimated 7 million hospitalizations and up to 13% of all maternal deaths worldwide each year. Medical abortion is a non-invasive method using two pills - mifepristone and misoprostol - or misoprostol alone.  Medical abortion is safe and effective and is recommended by the Word Health Organisation (WHO). Between 2015 and 2019 in Kenya, there were a total of 2,380,000 pregnancies annually. Of these, 1,450,000 pregnancies were unintended and 551,000 ended in abortion. in Nigeria, there were a total of 10,500,000 pregnancies annually with 2,990,000 unintended and 1,430,000 ended in abortion. In both countries, abortion is legal to preserve the pregnant person’s health. However, a majority of abortions are carried out by unqualified practitioners who run unsafe clinics. “Research shows that when women cannot access safe abortion care, they often seek unsafe methods,”  said Rebecca Wilkins, Technical Lead, Abortion at IPPF.  “This training course provides the information and resources necessary for health workers to support women who choose to have a safe abortion with pills in early pregnancy either within or outside a clinical setting.” The course is hosted on a login-based web portal which can be accessed from desktop or mobile and is structured to be an interactive learning experience, complete with quizzes and an option to download a certificate upon successful completion. In March this year, WHO issued new guidelines on abortion care.  The updated guidelines contain more than 50 recommendations covering clinical practice, health service delivery, and policy and legal actions including ensuring access to quality medical abortion pills. The new online training course is aligned to the clinical protocols recommended in the WHO guidelines. A landmark ruling by the High Court of Kenya in Malindi this year affirmed the right to abortion as a fundamental right under the Kenyan Constitution.  The ruling in a case filed by the Center for Reproductive Rights and Reproductive Health Network Kenya (RHNK) in 2020 against government officials involved the arrest of a minor and a clinician. It has set a precedent against arbitrary arrests and prosecution of patients and health care providers for seeking or offering abortion services. Such arrests and prosecutions are now deemed illegal according to the new ruling. ENDs  For further information, download the media kit HERE or contact: PR Consultant Njeri Wangari              Tel: +254 (0)722353657, e-mail: [email protected] IPPF: Mahmoud Garga                     Tel.   +254 (0) 704626920, e-mail: [email protected]    Catherine Kilfedder                                                         e-mail: [email protected]   ABOUT IPPF AFRICA REGION (IPPFAR) The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is one of the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organizations in Africa and a leading sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy voice in the region. Headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, the overarching goal of IPPFAR is to increase access to SRHR services to the most vulnerable youth, men and women, in sub-Saharan Africa.  Supported by thousands of volunteers, IPPFAR tackles the continent's growing SRHR challenges through a network of Member Associations (MAs) in 40 countries. We do this by developing our MAs into efficient entities with the capacity to deliver and sustain high-quality, youth-focused and gender-sensitive services.  We work with Governments, the African Union, Regional Economic Commissions, the Pan-African Parliament, and United Nations bodies, among others, to expand political and financial commitments to sexual and reproductive health and rights in Africa.  Learn more about us on our website. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

Treasure your pleasure
media center

| 03 September 2022

IPPF endorses pleasure-inclusive sexual health via the Pleasure Principles

IPPF is publicly committing to pleasure-inclusive sexual health and rights ahead of World Sexual Health Day by endorsing The Pleasure Project's Pleasure Principles Ahead of World Sexual Health Day on 4 September 2022, the theme of which is Let's talk pleasure, the world's largest sexual and reproductive healthcare organization, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), is publicly committing to pleasure-inclusive sexual health and rights (SRHR) by endorsing The Pleasure Project's Pleasure Principles. The seven principles, which include putting rights first, embracing learning, and loving yourself, promote a sex-positive, pleasure-based approach to sex and sexual health as opposed to standard prevention framing, which focuses only on avoiding pregnancy and sexually-transmitted infections (STIs). The Pleasure Principles are backed by new research with the World Health Organization, which shows that including sexual pleasure in sexual health education improves condom use compared to those that don't and increases knowledge and positive attitudes about sex, ultimately leading to better, safer sex and saving lives in the process. IPPF is adjusting to the shifting landscape of sexual health needs with seven pleasure-filled commitments, including incorporating staff training on pleasure-based sexual health and working with The Pleasure Project to integrate pleasure into more of its sexual and reproductive health programmes. The organization will also ensure that pleasure is a guiding principle in its upcoming 2023-2028 organizational strategy. Marie-Evelyne-Petrus-Barry, Regional Director for IPPF Africa Region, said: "IPPF has always believed that pleasure is fundamental to well-being and that comprehensive sexual education globally must be drastically improved, stepping away from fear-based framing and stepping into one rooted in understanding sexual and reproductive health more holistically. "We also must be honest that most people, especially young people, do not just have sex for reproductive reasons, but have sex for pleasure. We must do more to help people understand the spectrum of pleasure so they can better understand their own needs and wants, and we hope, have a better, safer and healthier sex life." IPPF Africa Region has stepped up to the mark with the Treasure Your Pleasure digital campaign for young people, which has already sparked a conversation on sexual pleasure, sexual health and sexual rights on social media. More than 8 million people have viewed the content, which includes information about pleasure-based sex and relationships, sexual safety and consent, and more than 30,000 new people have followed the region on social media to learn more about their sexual health and wellbeing. IPPF plans to implement learnings from the campaign across other regions.   Anne Philpott, Founder of the Pleasure Project, said: "The Pleasure Project is delighted that IPPF has endorsed the Pleasure Principles. As the largest global provider of sexual and reproductive health services, it shines a light on this long stigmatized blind-spot in sexual health.  "Pleasure, love and desire are key reasons people have sex and relationships. Yet health services have been focused on stopping disease or preventing pregnancy for too long, limiting their appeal and impact. Our recent evidence review with the World Health Organization demonstrates that pleasure-inclusive sexual health improves sexual health and ultimately saves lives. "This commitment is not only critical in ensuring the more than 200 million essential services they provide every year are honest, sex-positive and effective but also that the people they serve are respected as wanting to live fulfilling lives. "We are excited to partner with IPPF to put their commitment into action with staff training, implementation of pleasure-based sexual health and learning lessons on how to best deliver this new evidence and pleasure-filled best practice." *** For media enquiries, please contact Karmen Ivey at [email protected] or Amina Khan on [email protected]   About the International Planned Parenthood Federation The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) is a global service provider and advocate of sexual and reproductive health and rights for all.   For over 65 years, IPPF, through its 118 Member Associations and 15 partners, has delivered high-quality sexual and reproductive healthcare and helped advance sexual rights, especially for people with intersectional and diverse needs that are currently unmet. Our Member Associations and partners are independent organizations that are locally owned, which means the support and care they provide is informed by local expertise and context. We advocate for a world where people are provided with the information they need to make informed decisions about their sexual health and bodies. We stand up and fight for sexual and reproductive rights and against those who seek to deny people their human right to bodily autonomy and freedom. We deliver care that is rooted in rights, respect, and dignity - no matter what. Notes to Editors World Sexual Health 2022 has the theme 'Let's talk pleasure' - find assets here   The full list of Pleasure Principles can be found on www.thepleasureproject.org and include: Love Yourself Embrace Learning Talk Sexy Be Flexible Think Universal Rights First Be Positive  A pleasure-based approach celebrates sex, sexuality and the joy and wellbeing derived from these and creates a vision of good sex built on sexual rights. It focuses on sensory, mental, physical and sensual pleasure to enable individuals to understand, consent to, and control their bodies and multi-faceted desires. Well-being, safety, pleasure, desire and joy are the objectives of a programme with a pleasure-based approach. This approach measures empowerment, agency, and self-efficacy by whether or not an individual has been enabled to know what they want and can ask for it and request this of others in relation to their sexuality, desires and pleasure. [ The Pleasure Project, 2019]   The full list of IPPF's commitments includes: At least two Member Associations commit to testing elements of the Pleasure Principles in their work Incorporate training of staff across the Federation on Pleasure Based Sexual Health and the evidence that supports it Look to expand the Treasure Your Pleasure Campaign by the Africa Regional Office to other regions and use the learnings to inform Pleasure based-content across all regions A specific module on advocacy for pleasure in the IPPF internal training modules To work with the Pleasure Project to better understand how to incorporate Pleasure into our programmes with a focus on youth To work with at least thee sex positive, pleasure-based influencers on social media content Continue to ensure Pleasure is a principal guiding the new IPPF Strategy 2023-2028  

Treasure your pleasure
media_center

| 28 November 2022

IPPF endorses pleasure-inclusive sexual health via the Pleasure Principles

IPPF is publicly committing to pleasure-inclusive sexual health and rights ahead of World Sexual Health Day by endorsing The Pleasure Project's Pleasure Principles Ahead of World Sexual Health Day on 4 September 2022, the theme of which is Let's talk pleasure, the world's largest sexual and reproductive healthcare organization, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), is publicly committing to pleasure-inclusive sexual health and rights (SRHR) by endorsing The Pleasure Project's Pleasure Principles. The seven principles, which include putting rights first, embracing learning, and loving yourself, promote a sex-positive, pleasure-based approach to sex and sexual health as opposed to standard prevention framing, which focuses only on avoiding pregnancy and sexually-transmitted infections (STIs). The Pleasure Principles are backed by new research with the World Health Organization, which shows that including sexual pleasure in sexual health education improves condom use compared to those that don't and increases knowledge and positive attitudes about sex, ultimately leading to better, safer sex and saving lives in the process. IPPF is adjusting to the shifting landscape of sexual health needs with seven pleasure-filled commitments, including incorporating staff training on pleasure-based sexual health and working with The Pleasure Project to integrate pleasure into more of its sexual and reproductive health programmes. The organization will also ensure that pleasure is a guiding principle in its upcoming 2023-2028 organizational strategy. Marie-Evelyne-Petrus-Barry, Regional Director for IPPF Africa Region, said: "IPPF has always believed that pleasure is fundamental to well-being and that comprehensive sexual education globally must be drastically improved, stepping away from fear-based framing and stepping into one rooted in understanding sexual and reproductive health more holistically. "We also must be honest that most people, especially young people, do not just have sex for reproductive reasons, but have sex for pleasure. We must do more to help people understand the spectrum of pleasure so they can better understand their own needs and wants, and we hope, have a better, safer and healthier sex life." IPPF Africa Region has stepped up to the mark with the Treasure Your Pleasure digital campaign for young people, which has already sparked a conversation on sexual pleasure, sexual health and sexual rights on social media. More than 8 million people have viewed the content, which includes information about pleasure-based sex and relationships, sexual safety and consent, and more than 30,000 new people have followed the region on social media to learn more about their sexual health and wellbeing. IPPF plans to implement learnings from the campaign across other regions.   Anne Philpott, Founder of the Pleasure Project, said: "The Pleasure Project is delighted that IPPF has endorsed the Pleasure Principles. As the largest global provider of sexual and reproductive health services, it shines a light on this long stigmatized blind-spot in sexual health.  "Pleasure, love and desire are key reasons people have sex and relationships. Yet health services have been focused on stopping disease or preventing pregnancy for too long, limiting their appeal and impact. Our recent evidence review with the World Health Organization demonstrates that pleasure-inclusive sexual health improves sexual health and ultimately saves lives. "This commitment is not only critical in ensuring the more than 200 million essential services they provide every year are honest, sex-positive and effective but also that the people they serve are respected as wanting to live fulfilling lives. "We are excited to partner with IPPF to put their commitment into action with staff training, implementation of pleasure-based sexual health and learning lessons on how to best deliver this new evidence and pleasure-filled best practice." *** For media enquiries, please contact Karmen Ivey at [email protected] or Amina Khan on [email protected]   About the International Planned Parenthood Federation The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) is a global service provider and advocate of sexual and reproductive health and rights for all.   For over 65 years, IPPF, through its 118 Member Associations and 15 partners, has delivered high-quality sexual and reproductive healthcare and helped advance sexual rights, especially for people with intersectional and diverse needs that are currently unmet. Our Member Associations and partners are independent organizations that are locally owned, which means the support and care they provide is informed by local expertise and context. We advocate for a world where people are provided with the information they need to make informed decisions about their sexual health and bodies. We stand up and fight for sexual and reproductive rights and against those who seek to deny people their human right to bodily autonomy and freedom. We deliver care that is rooted in rights, respect, and dignity - no matter what. Notes to Editors World Sexual Health 2022 has the theme 'Let's talk pleasure' - find assets here   The full list of Pleasure Principles can be found on www.thepleasureproject.org and include: Love Yourself Embrace Learning Talk Sexy Be Flexible Think Universal Rights First Be Positive  A pleasure-based approach celebrates sex, sexuality and the joy and wellbeing derived from these and creates a vision of good sex built on sexual rights. It focuses on sensory, mental, physical and sensual pleasure to enable individuals to understand, consent to, and control their bodies and multi-faceted desires. Well-being, safety, pleasure, desire and joy are the objectives of a programme with a pleasure-based approach. This approach measures empowerment, agency, and self-efficacy by whether or not an individual has been enabled to know what they want and can ask for it and request this of others in relation to their sexuality, desires and pleasure. [ The Pleasure Project, 2019]   The full list of IPPF's commitments includes: At least two Member Associations commit to testing elements of the Pleasure Principles in their work Incorporate training of staff across the Federation on Pleasure Based Sexual Health and the evidence that supports it Look to expand the Treasure Your Pleasure Campaign by the Africa Regional Office to other regions and use the learnings to inform Pleasure based-content across all regions A specific module on advocacy for pleasure in the IPPF internal training modules To work with the Pleasure Project to better understand how to incorporate Pleasure into our programmes with a focus on youth To work with at least thee sex positive, pleasure-based influencers on social media content Continue to ensure Pleasure is a principal guiding the new IPPF Strategy 2023-2028  

IPPF New strategy launch
media center

| 26 November 2022

IPPF Adopts New Strategy as it Celebrates its 70th Birthday

The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), the world’s largest sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) organization, is celebrating its 70th birthday by embracing a new and bold global strategy. The International Planned Parenthood Federation was founded on 24th November 1952 in an act of international solidarity between eight national family planning organizations[i]. Now a network of more than 108 independent Member Associations (MAs) working in over 140 countries worldwide, the last 70 years have seen IPPF leave its mark on the world, delivering high-quality SRHR services and helping transform laws and policies across the globe. But facing a changing and challenging global landscape, IPPF heralds its 70th Birthday with a renewed strategic vision. More than 300 members from IPPF MAs affirmed the new six-year strategy - Come Together - at its General Assembly in the Colombian capital, Bogota, committing to building a future where more people in more places have what they need to enjoy their rights to sexual and reproductive dignity and well-being. Working in six regions across the globe, IPPF is prioritizing the Americas and the Caribbean due to the challenges it faces, investing 25% of its resources through its new regional office. The region has the second highest number of adolescent pregnancies, with 63 unintended pregnancies per 1,000 girls between 15 and 19[ii], mainly among those with little or no access to essential sexual and reproductive health services or educational opportunities. Kate Gilmore, Chair of the International Planned Parenthood Federation’s Board of Trustees, said: “Our bold ‘Come Together’ strategy affirms that human rights for all are the very heart of our Federation. Our new strategy commits us to urgent and purposeful human rights action so that, through our healthcare, information, and advocacy, millions more have what they need to live and love free from fear, discrimination and exclusion. “There are tough challenges to be met: political attacks on sexual and reproductive rights; deepening inequalities of poverty, racism, sexism and homophobia; armed conflict, intimate violence; structural injustices as well as the climate crisis. Those wrongs undermine the rights of billions across the globe, including sexual and reproductive rights. “IPPF will stand up for and with those denied dignity in their sexual and reproductive lives. Around the globe, we will strengthen our work in solidarity with local communities to better realize sexual and reproductive rights for all and stand up together against those who peddle bigotry, dismantle protections, and promote exclusions.” The new strategy sets out an ambitious programme of work over the next five years and provides a compelling focus on revitalizing the Federation. It is accompanied by an Anti-Racism Declaration of Intent, a statement of public accountability to continue working to dismantle racism internally and externally. The Secretariat and MAs – will commit to a fully inclusive and respectful Federation that offers equal chances for all, ensuring that IPPF emerges unambiguously as an anti-racist organization. IPPF’s General Assembly also marks the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women on Friday, 25th November 2022. Dr Alvaro Bermejo, Director-General of the International Planned Parenthood Federation, said: “Over the last few years, we have seen the devastating consequences of political, social and economic turmoil on women and girls’ bodies, with deepening inequalities exacerbated by environmental destruction and continued humanitarian crises. “It is also no secret that we are experiencing growing threats from a sinister opposition actively attacking people’s sexual and reproductive rights and freedoms alongside reduced funding and commitments from global leaders. “IPPF will continue to evolve and transform, so we can stand up forcefully and fearlessly to support those who are excluded, locked out and left behind, in particular youth and the most marginalized. Through our new strategy, Member Associations, the lifeblood of the Federation, will help millions more enjoy their sexual and reproductive health, rights and freedoms. “Turning 70 is also a time for IPPF to embody the change it wants to be. Over the next six years, we will build the Federation from the inside out, re-examining and affirming our values and spring-boarding off the Anti-Racism Declaration of Intent with open and fearless dialogue and action to address colonial legacies within IPPF.” What IPPF will do IPPF’s very existence manifests just how universal the demand for sexual and reproductive health and rights is, with MAs delivering more than 1 billion cumulative[iii] services between 2016 and 2022, including contraceptive services, STI treatments, abortion care, maternal health services and much more. IPPF’s humanitarian reach has also grown exponentially, with IPPF providing sexual and reproductive health services to over 6 million people in acute humanitarian and fragile settings in 2021. But, with the number of women with an unmet need for family planning sitting at 163 million[iv], the current trajectory to close the gender gap worldwide on course to take 135.6[v] years and 274[vi] million people needing humanitarian assistance in 2022 – a 39[vii] million increase from 2021, there is much more to do. To increase its impact and reach, IPPF is committing to bold and catalytic transformation driven by young people. To broaden access to enjoyment of sexual and reproductive health and rights, IPPF’s new strategy sets up four central pillars: Centre care on people. IPPF will provide high-quality person-centred care to more people in more places. Move the sexuality agenda. IPPF will push for the societal and legislative change needed to make universal sexual and reproductive rights a reality for more. Solidarity for change. IPPF will build bridges to other movements, sectors, and communities wherever sexual and reproductive health and rights can also help advance other human rights causes. Nurture our Federation. IPPF will make its core values more explicit and apply their implications across the Federation more comprehensively to unleash stronger collective power for deeper global solidarity that can deliver greater impact. How IPPF will do it The Federation will focus its resources on excluded and marginalized people. It will walk shoulder to shoulder with those young people, individuals and communities bearing the full brunt of stigma and prejudice. At each step, IPPF will defend, protect, and celebrate safety, pleasure and well-being in sex and reproduction. IPPF will also work with governments to help shape laws, policies and norms, including through feminist action and international solidarity, and by working to remove restrictions that infringe on dignity, choice, and well-being. At every turn, IPPF will denounce powers and authorities who, through policy, practice, and law, undermine human rights in the intimate domains of sex and reproduction. With IPPF’s work deeply intertwined with broader struggles for human rights, anti-racist movements and movements for climate survival, social justice and equality, IPPF will also foster global solidarity by coming together with like-minded sectors and actors to help transform lives, communities and countries. Throughout, IPPF will be accountable for what it does, how it does it, and whose lives it affects. To accelerate its anti-racism agenda, IPPF will extend an Anti-Racism Declaration of Intent across the Federation, strengthening belonging and accountability for and to all its members and ensuring fair and equitable systems are in place to deliver the action and meaningful change to which it is committed.   For media enquiries, please contact Karmen Ivey on [email protected] or [email protected]   About the International Planned Parenthood Federation The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) is a global service provider and advocate of sexual and reproductive health and rights for all.   For 70 years, IPPF, through its 108 Member Associations and 7 partners, has delivered high-quality sexual and reproductive healthcare and helped advance sexual rights, especially for people with intersectional and diverse needs that are currently unmet. Our Member Associations and partners are independent organizations that are locally owned, which means the support and care they provide is informed by local expertise and context. We advocate for a world where people are provided with the information they need to make informed decisions about their sexual health and bodies. We stand up and fight for sexual and reproductive rights and against those who seek to deny people their human right to bodily autonomy and freedom. We deliver care that is rooted in rights, respect, and dignity - no matter what. [i]  The International Planned Parenthood Federation was founded on the 24th of November 1952 as an act of international solidarity between eight national family planning organizations in Germany, Hong Kong, India, Netherlands, Singapore, Sweden, UK, and USA. [ii] https://www.unfpa.org/data/CO [iii] https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(22)00936-9/fulltext [iv] UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, “Family Planning and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”: https://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/publications/pdf/family/familyPlanning_DataBooklet_2019.pdf [v] World Economic Forum, Global Gender Gap Report 2021: https://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_GGGR_2021.pdf [vi] UNOCHA Global Humanitarian Overview 2022 (Abridged Report): Global Humanitarian Overview 2022 (Abridged Report) - World | ReliefWeb [vii]Ibid

IPPF New strategy launch
media_center

| 28 November 2022

IPPF Adopts New Strategy as it Celebrates its 70th Birthday

The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), the world’s largest sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) organization, is celebrating its 70th birthday by embracing a new and bold global strategy. The International Planned Parenthood Federation was founded on 24th November 1952 in an act of international solidarity between eight national family planning organizations[i]. Now a network of more than 108 independent Member Associations (MAs) working in over 140 countries worldwide, the last 70 years have seen IPPF leave its mark on the world, delivering high-quality SRHR services and helping transform laws and policies across the globe. But facing a changing and challenging global landscape, IPPF heralds its 70th Birthday with a renewed strategic vision. More than 300 members from IPPF MAs affirmed the new six-year strategy - Come Together - at its General Assembly in the Colombian capital, Bogota, committing to building a future where more people in more places have what they need to enjoy their rights to sexual and reproductive dignity and well-being. Working in six regions across the globe, IPPF is prioritizing the Americas and the Caribbean due to the challenges it faces, investing 25% of its resources through its new regional office. The region has the second highest number of adolescent pregnancies, with 63 unintended pregnancies per 1,000 girls between 15 and 19[ii], mainly among those with little or no access to essential sexual and reproductive health services or educational opportunities. Kate Gilmore, Chair of the International Planned Parenthood Federation’s Board of Trustees, said: “Our bold ‘Come Together’ strategy affirms that human rights for all are the very heart of our Federation. Our new strategy commits us to urgent and purposeful human rights action so that, through our healthcare, information, and advocacy, millions more have what they need to live and love free from fear, discrimination and exclusion. “There are tough challenges to be met: political attacks on sexual and reproductive rights; deepening inequalities of poverty, racism, sexism and homophobia; armed conflict, intimate violence; structural injustices as well as the climate crisis. Those wrongs undermine the rights of billions across the globe, including sexual and reproductive rights. “IPPF will stand up for and with those denied dignity in their sexual and reproductive lives. Around the globe, we will strengthen our work in solidarity with local communities to better realize sexual and reproductive rights for all and stand up together against those who peddle bigotry, dismantle protections, and promote exclusions.” The new strategy sets out an ambitious programme of work over the next five years and provides a compelling focus on revitalizing the Federation. It is accompanied by an Anti-Racism Declaration of Intent, a statement of public accountability to continue working to dismantle racism internally and externally. The Secretariat and MAs – will commit to a fully inclusive and respectful Federation that offers equal chances for all, ensuring that IPPF emerges unambiguously as an anti-racist organization. IPPF’s General Assembly also marks the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women on Friday, 25th November 2022. Dr Alvaro Bermejo, Director-General of the International Planned Parenthood Federation, said: “Over the last few years, we have seen the devastating consequences of political, social and economic turmoil on women and girls’ bodies, with deepening inequalities exacerbated by environmental destruction and continued humanitarian crises. “It is also no secret that we are experiencing growing threats from a sinister opposition actively attacking people’s sexual and reproductive rights and freedoms alongside reduced funding and commitments from global leaders. “IPPF will continue to evolve and transform, so we can stand up forcefully and fearlessly to support those who are excluded, locked out and left behind, in particular youth and the most marginalized. Through our new strategy, Member Associations, the lifeblood of the Federation, will help millions more enjoy their sexual and reproductive health, rights and freedoms. “Turning 70 is also a time for IPPF to embody the change it wants to be. Over the next six years, we will build the Federation from the inside out, re-examining and affirming our values and spring-boarding off the Anti-Racism Declaration of Intent with open and fearless dialogue and action to address colonial legacies within IPPF.” What IPPF will do IPPF’s very existence manifests just how universal the demand for sexual and reproductive health and rights is, with MAs delivering more than 1 billion cumulative[iii] services between 2016 and 2022, including contraceptive services, STI treatments, abortion care, maternal health services and much more. IPPF’s humanitarian reach has also grown exponentially, with IPPF providing sexual and reproductive health services to over 6 million people in acute humanitarian and fragile settings in 2021. But, with the number of women with an unmet need for family planning sitting at 163 million[iv], the current trajectory to close the gender gap worldwide on course to take 135.6[v] years and 274[vi] million people needing humanitarian assistance in 2022 – a 39[vii] million increase from 2021, there is much more to do. To increase its impact and reach, IPPF is committing to bold and catalytic transformation driven by young people. To broaden access to enjoyment of sexual and reproductive health and rights, IPPF’s new strategy sets up four central pillars: Centre care on people. IPPF will provide high-quality person-centred care to more people in more places. Move the sexuality agenda. IPPF will push for the societal and legislative change needed to make universal sexual and reproductive rights a reality for more. Solidarity for change. IPPF will build bridges to other movements, sectors, and communities wherever sexual and reproductive health and rights can also help advance other human rights causes. Nurture our Federation. IPPF will make its core values more explicit and apply their implications across the Federation more comprehensively to unleash stronger collective power for deeper global solidarity that can deliver greater impact. How IPPF will do it The Federation will focus its resources on excluded and marginalized people. It will walk shoulder to shoulder with those young people, individuals and communities bearing the full brunt of stigma and prejudice. At each step, IPPF will defend, protect, and celebrate safety, pleasure and well-being in sex and reproduction. IPPF will also work with governments to help shape laws, policies and norms, including through feminist action and international solidarity, and by working to remove restrictions that infringe on dignity, choice, and well-being. At every turn, IPPF will denounce powers and authorities who, through policy, practice, and law, undermine human rights in the intimate domains of sex and reproduction. With IPPF’s work deeply intertwined with broader struggles for human rights, anti-racist movements and movements for climate survival, social justice and equality, IPPF will also foster global solidarity by coming together with like-minded sectors and actors to help transform lives, communities and countries. Throughout, IPPF will be accountable for what it does, how it does it, and whose lives it affects. To accelerate its anti-racism agenda, IPPF will extend an Anti-Racism Declaration of Intent across the Federation, strengthening belonging and accountability for and to all its members and ensuring fair and equitable systems are in place to deliver the action and meaningful change to which it is committed.   For media enquiries, please contact Karmen Ivey on [email protected] or [email protected]   About the International Planned Parenthood Federation The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) is a global service provider and advocate of sexual and reproductive health and rights for all.   For 70 years, IPPF, through its 108 Member Associations and 7 partners, has delivered high-quality sexual and reproductive healthcare and helped advance sexual rights, especially for people with intersectional and diverse needs that are currently unmet. Our Member Associations and partners are independent organizations that are locally owned, which means the support and care they provide is informed by local expertise and context. We advocate for a world where people are provided with the information they need to make informed decisions about their sexual health and bodies. We stand up and fight for sexual and reproductive rights and against those who seek to deny people their human right to bodily autonomy and freedom. We deliver care that is rooted in rights, respect, and dignity - no matter what. [i]  The International Planned Parenthood Federation was founded on the 24th of November 1952 as an act of international solidarity between eight national family planning organizations in Germany, Hong Kong, India, Netherlands, Singapore, Sweden, UK, and USA. [ii] https://www.unfpa.org/data/CO [iii] https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(22)00936-9/fulltext [iv] UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, “Family Planning and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”: https://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/publications/pdf/family/familyPlanning_DataBooklet_2019.pdf [v] World Economic Forum, Global Gender Gap Report 2021: https://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_GGGR_2021.pdf [vi] UNOCHA Global Humanitarian Overview 2022 (Abridged Report): Global Humanitarian Overview 2022 (Abridged Report) - World | ReliefWeb [vii]Ibid

Benin news in NY Time
media center

| 22 November 2022

The New York Times article: A Year After Widening Abortion Access, Benin Sees Fewer Botched Ones

Benin news in NY Time
media_center

| 28 November 2022

The New York Times article: A Year After Widening Abortion Access, Benin Sees Fewer Botched Ones

Abidjan launch 1
media center

| 16 November 2022

IPPF West And Central Africa Sub Office launch event

The Africa Regional Office of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (#IPPF) gathered from 17 to 22 October in Abidjan, all the Executive Directors and Presidents of the Youth Action Movements (YAMs) of its Member Associations in West and Central Africa (Francophone, Anglophone and Lusophone) as part of the launch of its new sub-office for West and Central Africa. Watch the highlights of this event here: Abidjan Sub Office Launch Photo Album and on the below video.  

Abidjan launch 1
media_center

| 28 November 2022

IPPF West And Central Africa Sub Office launch event

The Africa Regional Office of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (#IPPF) gathered from 17 to 22 October in Abidjan, all the Executive Directors and Presidents of the Youth Action Movements (YAMs) of its Member Associations in West and Central Africa (Francophone, Anglophone and Lusophone) as part of the launch of its new sub-office for West and Central Africa. Watch the highlights of this event here: Abidjan Sub Office Launch Photo Album and on the below video.  

Guinea Report
media center

| 27 September 2022

Guinea: Act now to ensure greater support and assistance for survivors of sexual violence

New report calls on Guinean authorities to improve prevention from rape and care for survivors Authorities must introduce new law on gender-based violence   Over 400 complaints for rape were registered in 2021, most of survivors were minors Amnesty and IPPFAR denounce barriers to justice for victims leading to impunity Victims of sexual violence in Guinea face social stigmatization, a lack of accessible medical care and serious barriers to justice, said Amnesty International and the International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) today in a new report ‘Shame must change sides, ensuring rights and justice for victims of sexual violence in Guinea’. Based on interviews with survivors of rape, administrative, judicial, traditional, and religious authorities, health care professionals, diplomats, civil society representatives, the report analyses the numerous obstacles to effective care for victims of rape, forensic examination, psychological support, and access to justice in Guinea. For many survivors, justice remains unattainable.  "Victims and their families have repeatedly told us that the horrendous sexual violence they experienced is compounded by societal judgement, but silence is starting to break on rape cases and civil society is moving to denounce sexual violence,” said Samira Daoud, Amnesty International's Regional Director for West and Central Africa. “Despite recent efforts by the authorities to tackle the issue of sexual violence, many remains to be done in terms of information, prevention, access to care and justice to respect Guinea's obligations under international and regional human rights laws.” In 2021, the Office for the Protection of Gender, Children and Morals (Oprogem) and the Special Brigade for the Protection of Vulnerable Persons (BSPPV) - specialized units within the police and the gendarmerie- dealt with more than 400 cases of rape, and most of the victims were minors, some of whom are under 13.  This report shows that the real figures of rape cases are undoubtedly higher, considering notably the practice of extrajudicial settlement and the higher number of cases treated in medical centres. Social stigmatization Victims of sexual violence and their families often face intense judgement in their communities amid widespread social stigmatization. The mother of a girl who said she was raped told Amnesty International about the stigma her child experienced: “[…] When we went to the hospital, one of the doctors said: ‘This is the little girl who was raped’. It hurts. Everywhere she goes, people point at her. She is always locked up in the house. She doesn't go out; she hardly communicates with people. She wants to go back to school but it's not possible." More efforts should be done by the authorities to develop awareness and education campaigns to address the underlying social and cultural attitudes that discriminate against women and facilitate and perpetuate violence against them. These campaigns should promote zero tolerance for violence against women, debunk harmful gender stereotypes and myths associated with rape, eliminate the stigma associated with women victims of violence, and encourage victims to seek redress. Urgent need to improve access to care, sexual and reproductive rights and psychological support Guinea lacks an effective toll-free number enabling victims to report sexual violence and to receive medical and legal advice. And despite some initiatives like the creation of one-stop centres offering care and legal support, the availability, quality, and accessibility of the health system must be strengthened for victims, often of modest economic status. Many survivors are unable to access effective medical and psychological care or realise their right to sexual and reproductive health. Most medical specialist practice in the capital city Conakry and the cost of care can sometimes prevent victims from seeking treatment. A doctor said to Amnesty International: “We can provide free consultations and reports. But if people have complications that require surgery, or infectious complications that require medication, we can't do that for free.” “The social stigma associated with rape in Guinea, which often leads to not reporting the crime and not filing complaints, leaves survivors of these atrocities without access to medical care and psychosocial support as well as legal aid to access justice and redress”, said Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry, IPPFAR Regional Director. “Gender based violence in all its forms is recognised as a human rights violation by the international human rights framework and jurisprudence. Gender inequality, power imbalance and lack of respect for human rights are often the root causes of such heinous acts and prevents survivors from accessing and enjoying their full sexual and reproductive health and rights. As human rights defenders, we must all take a stand and put a stop to these inexcusable acts”, added Petrus-Barry. Accessing justice is an obstacle course for victims Despite achieving real progress by adjusting legal frameworks in recent years and developing specialized police and gendarmerie units to respond to sexual violence cases, gaining access to justice in Guinea remains a challenging obstacle course for victims of sexual violence, while perpetrators often enjoy impunity. Customary authorities have been able to push for out of court settlements leading to prosecutions being dropped, which is against the law and against the rights of the survivors. Although there is lack of forensic specialists and the presentation of a medico-legal certificate is not a legal condition for filing a complaint, in practice it is often required. And even when this document is not required by the police or the gendarmerie, its absence becomes a major obstacle to a possible conviction in court. Judicial investigations are often hampered by a lack of resources and training in addressing and investigating sexual violence, which negatively impacts victims’ quest for justice. In the absence of effective free legal assistance for those unable to afford a lawyer, only NGOs are able to provide legal support. Similarly, Guinea’s justice system also lacks resources. The majority of judges, most of whom are men, work in poor conditions. The report of rapes survivors highlights that some of them perpetuate patriarchal stereotypes while handling sexual violence cases. Furthermore, the fact that the survivors of the 28 September 2009 massacre had to wait 13 years to finally hope for justice and reparation was a powerful symbol of impunity; while the defence and security forces killed more than 150 demonstrators and committed sexual crimes against more than 100 women in a stadium in Conakry that day.   To strengthen their response to sexual violence, the Guinean authorities must urgently pass a comprehensive law on gender-based violence, among other recommendations highlighted in the report to strengthen the capacity of the judiciary, police and other law enforcement authorities, and social and health workers, to ensure full implementation of legal provisions aimed at addressing violence against women.   “Guinean authorities promised that they would fight gender-based violence and rape.  We urge them to take concrete steps to strengthen state efforts to prevent sexual violence, and guarantee care and justice for survivors,” said Samira Daoud. For further information or to request an interview, please contact: -Ousmane DRABO, Media Manager at Amnesty International’s West and Central Africa region office- email: [email protected] / Mob: +221 776234040 or [email protected] -Mahmoud GARGA, Lead Specialist - Strategic Communication, Media Relations and Digital Campaigning, IPPF Africa Regional Office (IPPFARO) – email: [email protected] / Tel: +254 704 626 920   ABOUT IPPF AFRICA REGION (IPPFAR) The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is one of the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organization in Africa, and a leading sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy voice in the region. Headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, the overarching goal of IPPFAR is to increase access to SRHR services to the most vulnerable youth, men and women in sub-Saharan Africa. Supported by thousands of volunteers, IPPFAR tackles the continent’s growing SRHR challenges through a network of Member Associations (MAs) in 40 countries. We do this by developing our MAs into efficient entities with the capacity to deliver and sustain high quality, youth focused and gender sensitive services. We work with Governments, the African Union, Regional Economic Commissions, the Pan-African Parliament, United Nations bodies among others to expand political and financial commitments to sexual and reproductive health and rights in Africa. Learn more about us on our website. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

Guinea Report
media_center

| 28 November 2022

Guinea: Act now to ensure greater support and assistance for survivors of sexual violence

New report calls on Guinean authorities to improve prevention from rape and care for survivors Authorities must introduce new law on gender-based violence   Over 400 complaints for rape were registered in 2021, most of survivors were minors Amnesty and IPPFAR denounce barriers to justice for victims leading to impunity Victims of sexual violence in Guinea face social stigmatization, a lack of accessible medical care and serious barriers to justice, said Amnesty International and the International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) today in a new report ‘Shame must change sides, ensuring rights and justice for victims of sexual violence in Guinea’. Based on interviews with survivors of rape, administrative, judicial, traditional, and religious authorities, health care professionals, diplomats, civil society representatives, the report analyses the numerous obstacles to effective care for victims of rape, forensic examination, psychological support, and access to justice in Guinea. For many survivors, justice remains unattainable.  "Victims and their families have repeatedly told us that the horrendous sexual violence they experienced is compounded by societal judgement, but silence is starting to break on rape cases and civil society is moving to denounce sexual violence,” said Samira Daoud, Amnesty International's Regional Director for West and Central Africa. “Despite recent efforts by the authorities to tackle the issue of sexual violence, many remains to be done in terms of information, prevention, access to care and justice to respect Guinea's obligations under international and regional human rights laws.” In 2021, the Office for the Protection of Gender, Children and Morals (Oprogem) and the Special Brigade for the Protection of Vulnerable Persons (BSPPV) - specialized units within the police and the gendarmerie- dealt with more than 400 cases of rape, and most of the victims were minors, some of whom are under 13.  This report shows that the real figures of rape cases are undoubtedly higher, considering notably the practice of extrajudicial settlement and the higher number of cases treated in medical centres. Social stigmatization Victims of sexual violence and their families often face intense judgement in their communities amid widespread social stigmatization. The mother of a girl who said she was raped told Amnesty International about the stigma her child experienced: “[…] When we went to the hospital, one of the doctors said: ‘This is the little girl who was raped’. It hurts. Everywhere she goes, people point at her. She is always locked up in the house. She doesn't go out; she hardly communicates with people. She wants to go back to school but it's not possible." More efforts should be done by the authorities to develop awareness and education campaigns to address the underlying social and cultural attitudes that discriminate against women and facilitate and perpetuate violence against them. These campaigns should promote zero tolerance for violence against women, debunk harmful gender stereotypes and myths associated with rape, eliminate the stigma associated with women victims of violence, and encourage victims to seek redress. Urgent need to improve access to care, sexual and reproductive rights and psychological support Guinea lacks an effective toll-free number enabling victims to report sexual violence and to receive medical and legal advice. And despite some initiatives like the creation of one-stop centres offering care and legal support, the availability, quality, and accessibility of the health system must be strengthened for victims, often of modest economic status. Many survivors are unable to access effective medical and psychological care or realise their right to sexual and reproductive health. Most medical specialist practice in the capital city Conakry and the cost of care can sometimes prevent victims from seeking treatment. A doctor said to Amnesty International: “We can provide free consultations and reports. But if people have complications that require surgery, or infectious complications that require medication, we can't do that for free.” “The social stigma associated with rape in Guinea, which often leads to not reporting the crime and not filing complaints, leaves survivors of these atrocities without access to medical care and psychosocial support as well as legal aid to access justice and redress”, said Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry, IPPFAR Regional Director. “Gender based violence in all its forms is recognised as a human rights violation by the international human rights framework and jurisprudence. Gender inequality, power imbalance and lack of respect for human rights are often the root causes of such heinous acts and prevents survivors from accessing and enjoying their full sexual and reproductive health and rights. As human rights defenders, we must all take a stand and put a stop to these inexcusable acts”, added Petrus-Barry. Accessing justice is an obstacle course for victims Despite achieving real progress by adjusting legal frameworks in recent years and developing specialized police and gendarmerie units to respond to sexual violence cases, gaining access to justice in Guinea remains a challenging obstacle course for victims of sexual violence, while perpetrators often enjoy impunity. Customary authorities have been able to push for out of court settlements leading to prosecutions being dropped, which is against the law and against the rights of the survivors. Although there is lack of forensic specialists and the presentation of a medico-legal certificate is not a legal condition for filing a complaint, in practice it is often required. And even when this document is not required by the police or the gendarmerie, its absence becomes a major obstacle to a possible conviction in court. Judicial investigations are often hampered by a lack of resources and training in addressing and investigating sexual violence, which negatively impacts victims’ quest for justice. In the absence of effective free legal assistance for those unable to afford a lawyer, only NGOs are able to provide legal support. Similarly, Guinea’s justice system also lacks resources. The majority of judges, most of whom are men, work in poor conditions. The report of rapes survivors highlights that some of them perpetuate patriarchal stereotypes while handling sexual violence cases. Furthermore, the fact that the survivors of the 28 September 2009 massacre had to wait 13 years to finally hope for justice and reparation was a powerful symbol of impunity; while the defence and security forces killed more than 150 demonstrators and committed sexual crimes against more than 100 women in a stadium in Conakry that day.   To strengthen their response to sexual violence, the Guinean authorities must urgently pass a comprehensive law on gender-based violence, among other recommendations highlighted in the report to strengthen the capacity of the judiciary, police and other law enforcement authorities, and social and health workers, to ensure full implementation of legal provisions aimed at addressing violence against women.   “Guinean authorities promised that they would fight gender-based violence and rape.  We urge them to take concrete steps to strengthen state efforts to prevent sexual violence, and guarantee care and justice for survivors,” said Samira Daoud. For further information or to request an interview, please contact: -Ousmane DRABO, Media Manager at Amnesty International’s West and Central Africa region office- email: [email protected] / Mob: +221 776234040 or [email protected] -Mahmoud GARGA, Lead Specialist - Strategic Communication, Media Relations and Digital Campaigning, IPPF Africa Regional Office (IPPFARO) – email: [email protected] / Tel: +254 704 626 920   ABOUT IPPF AFRICA REGION (IPPFAR) The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is one of the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organization in Africa, and a leading sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy voice in the region. Headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, the overarching goal of IPPFAR is to increase access to SRHR services to the most vulnerable youth, men and women in sub-Saharan Africa. Supported by thousands of volunteers, IPPFAR tackles the continent’s growing SRHR challenges through a network of Member Associations (MAs) in 40 countries. We do this by developing our MAs into efficient entities with the capacity to deliver and sustain high quality, youth focused and gender sensitive services. We work with Governments, the African Union, Regional Economic Commissions, the Pan-African Parliament, United Nations bodies among others to expand political and financial commitments to sexual and reproductive health and rights in Africa. Learn more about us on our website. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

Safe abortion course
media center

| 20 September 2022

IPPF launches free online medical abortion course

Training co-created with How To Use Abortion Pill Training endorsed by the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Training course complete with quizzes and an option to download a certificate upon successful completion Course comes as World Health Organisation (WHO) issues new guidelines on abortion care and will help put the WHO guidelines into practice globally Over 25 million unsafe abortions occur each year From 2015 to 2019 in Kenya, there were 2,380,000 pregnancies annually. Of these, 1,450,000 pregnancies were unintended and 551,000 ended in abortion Landmark High Court of Kenya ruling in March 2022 affirms abortion care as a fundamental right under the Constitution of Kenya Nairobi – 20th September 2022 – International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) and HowToUseAbortionPill.org have developed a free online medical abortion training course to equip healthcare workers with the necessary skills to provide care for women seeking medical abortion up to 13 weeks’ gestation. The course is aimed at the full range of providers, including physicians, midwives, pharmacists, medical students and community health workers. The course, which has been endorsed by the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO), is a seven-lesson video series accessible via the link https://elearning.howtouseabortionpill.org. It covers an overview of abortion care; how to support a medical abortion; symptoms, side effects and complications; and aftercare. The training is framed around four principles of care: person-centred care, rights-based care, quality, and privacy and confidentiality. “Abortion care continues to be left off medical training curriculums,” said Mallah Tabot, Lead SRHR Programming at IPPF Africa Region. “This online course will fill a critical gap in the education of many health workers. It has the potential to significantly increase the number of health workers with the skills and knowledge to provide abortion care, especially in low-resource settings, and thereby increase the number of women supported to safely end a pregnancy.” Unsafe abortion remains a serious global threat to women's health and safety, causing an estimated 7 million hospitalizations and up to 13% of all maternal deaths worldwide each year. Medical abortion is a non-invasive method using two pills - mifepristone and misoprostol - or misoprostol alone.  Medical abortion is safe and effective and is recommended by the Word Health Organisation (WHO). Between 2015 and 2019 in Kenya, there were a total of 2,380,000 pregnancies annually. Of these, 1,450,000 pregnancies were unintended and 551,000 ended in abortion. in Nigeria, there were a total of 10,500,000 pregnancies annually with 2,990,000 unintended and 1,430,000 ended in abortion. In both countries, abortion is legal to preserve the pregnant person’s health. However, a majority of abortions are carried out by unqualified practitioners who run unsafe clinics. “Research shows that when women cannot access safe abortion care, they often seek unsafe methods,”  said Rebecca Wilkins, Technical Lead, Abortion at IPPF.  “This training course provides the information and resources necessary for health workers to support women who choose to have a safe abortion with pills in early pregnancy either within or outside a clinical setting.” The course is hosted on a login-based web portal which can be accessed from desktop or mobile and is structured to be an interactive learning experience, complete with quizzes and an option to download a certificate upon successful completion. In March this year, WHO issued new guidelines on abortion care.  The updated guidelines contain more than 50 recommendations covering clinical practice, health service delivery, and policy and legal actions including ensuring access to quality medical abortion pills. The new online training course is aligned to the clinical protocols recommended in the WHO guidelines. A landmark ruling by the High Court of Kenya in Malindi this year affirmed the right to abortion as a fundamental right under the Kenyan Constitution.  The ruling in a case filed by the Center for Reproductive Rights and Reproductive Health Network Kenya (RHNK) in 2020 against government officials involved the arrest of a minor and a clinician. It has set a precedent against arbitrary arrests and prosecution of patients and health care providers for seeking or offering abortion services. Such arrests and prosecutions are now deemed illegal according to the new ruling. ENDs  For further information, download the media kit HERE or contact: PR Consultant Njeri Wangari              Tel: +254 (0)722353657, e-mail: [email protected] IPPF: Mahmoud Garga                     Tel.   +254 (0) 704626920, e-mail: [email protected]    Catherine Kilfedder                                                         e-mail: [email protected]   ABOUT IPPF AFRICA REGION (IPPFAR) The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is one of the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organizations in Africa and a leading sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy voice in the region. Headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, the overarching goal of IPPFAR is to increase access to SRHR services to the most vulnerable youth, men and women, in sub-Saharan Africa.  Supported by thousands of volunteers, IPPFAR tackles the continent's growing SRHR challenges through a network of Member Associations (MAs) in 40 countries. We do this by developing our MAs into efficient entities with the capacity to deliver and sustain high-quality, youth-focused and gender-sensitive services.  We work with Governments, the African Union, Regional Economic Commissions, the Pan-African Parliament, and United Nations bodies, among others, to expand political and financial commitments to sexual and reproductive health and rights in Africa.  Learn more about us on our website. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

Safe abortion course
media_center

| 29 November 2022

IPPF launches free online medical abortion course

Training co-created with How To Use Abortion Pill Training endorsed by the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Training course complete with quizzes and an option to download a certificate upon successful completion Course comes as World Health Organisation (WHO) issues new guidelines on abortion care and will help put the WHO guidelines into practice globally Over 25 million unsafe abortions occur each year From 2015 to 2019 in Kenya, there were 2,380,000 pregnancies annually. Of these, 1,450,000 pregnancies were unintended and 551,000 ended in abortion Landmark High Court of Kenya ruling in March 2022 affirms abortion care as a fundamental right under the Constitution of Kenya Nairobi – 20th September 2022 – International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) and HowToUseAbortionPill.org have developed a free online medical abortion training course to equip healthcare workers with the necessary skills to provide care for women seeking medical abortion up to 13 weeks’ gestation. The course is aimed at the full range of providers, including physicians, midwives, pharmacists, medical students and community health workers. The course, which has been endorsed by the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO), is a seven-lesson video series accessible via the link https://elearning.howtouseabortionpill.org. It covers an overview of abortion care; how to support a medical abortion; symptoms, side effects and complications; and aftercare. The training is framed around four principles of care: person-centred care, rights-based care, quality, and privacy and confidentiality. “Abortion care continues to be left off medical training curriculums,” said Mallah Tabot, Lead SRHR Programming at IPPF Africa Region. “This online course will fill a critical gap in the education of many health workers. It has the potential to significantly increase the number of health workers with the skills and knowledge to provide abortion care, especially in low-resource settings, and thereby increase the number of women supported to safely end a pregnancy.” Unsafe abortion remains a serious global threat to women's health and safety, causing an estimated 7 million hospitalizations and up to 13% of all maternal deaths worldwide each year. Medical abortion is a non-invasive method using two pills - mifepristone and misoprostol - or misoprostol alone.  Medical abortion is safe and effective and is recommended by the Word Health Organisation (WHO). Between 2015 and 2019 in Kenya, there were a total of 2,380,000 pregnancies annually. Of these, 1,450,000 pregnancies were unintended and 551,000 ended in abortion. in Nigeria, there were a total of 10,500,000 pregnancies annually with 2,990,000 unintended and 1,430,000 ended in abortion. In both countries, abortion is legal to preserve the pregnant person’s health. However, a majority of abortions are carried out by unqualified practitioners who run unsafe clinics. “Research shows that when women cannot access safe abortion care, they often seek unsafe methods,”  said Rebecca Wilkins, Technical Lead, Abortion at IPPF.  “This training course provides the information and resources necessary for health workers to support women who choose to have a safe abortion with pills in early pregnancy either within or outside a clinical setting.” The course is hosted on a login-based web portal which can be accessed from desktop or mobile and is structured to be an interactive learning experience, complete with quizzes and an option to download a certificate upon successful completion. In March this year, WHO issued new guidelines on abortion care.  The updated guidelines contain more than 50 recommendations covering clinical practice, health service delivery, and policy and legal actions including ensuring access to quality medical abortion pills. The new online training course is aligned to the clinical protocols recommended in the WHO guidelines. A landmark ruling by the High Court of Kenya in Malindi this year affirmed the right to abortion as a fundamental right under the Kenyan Constitution.  The ruling in a case filed by the Center for Reproductive Rights and Reproductive Health Network Kenya (RHNK) in 2020 against government officials involved the arrest of a minor and a clinician. It has set a precedent against arbitrary arrests and prosecution of patients and health care providers for seeking or offering abortion services. Such arrests and prosecutions are now deemed illegal according to the new ruling. ENDs  For further information, download the media kit HERE or contact: PR Consultant Njeri Wangari              Tel: +254 (0)722353657, e-mail: [email protected] IPPF: Mahmoud Garga                     Tel.   +254 (0) 704626920, e-mail: [email protected]    Catherine Kilfedder                                                         e-mail: [email protected]   ABOUT IPPF AFRICA REGION (IPPFAR) The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is one of the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organizations in Africa and a leading sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy voice in the region. Headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, the overarching goal of IPPFAR is to increase access to SRHR services to the most vulnerable youth, men and women, in sub-Saharan Africa.  Supported by thousands of volunteers, IPPFAR tackles the continent's growing SRHR challenges through a network of Member Associations (MAs) in 40 countries. We do this by developing our MAs into efficient entities with the capacity to deliver and sustain high-quality, youth-focused and gender-sensitive services.  We work with Governments, the African Union, Regional Economic Commissions, the Pan-African Parliament, and United Nations bodies, among others, to expand political and financial commitments to sexual and reproductive health and rights in Africa.  Learn more about us on our website. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

Treasure your pleasure
media center

| 03 September 2022

IPPF endorses pleasure-inclusive sexual health via the Pleasure Principles

IPPF is publicly committing to pleasure-inclusive sexual health and rights ahead of World Sexual Health Day by endorsing The Pleasure Project's Pleasure Principles Ahead of World Sexual Health Day on 4 September 2022, the theme of which is Let's talk pleasure, the world's largest sexual and reproductive healthcare organization, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), is publicly committing to pleasure-inclusive sexual health and rights (SRHR) by endorsing The Pleasure Project's Pleasure Principles. The seven principles, which include putting rights first, embracing learning, and loving yourself, promote a sex-positive, pleasure-based approach to sex and sexual health as opposed to standard prevention framing, which focuses only on avoiding pregnancy and sexually-transmitted infections (STIs). The Pleasure Principles are backed by new research with the World Health Organization, which shows that including sexual pleasure in sexual health education improves condom use compared to those that don't and increases knowledge and positive attitudes about sex, ultimately leading to better, safer sex and saving lives in the process. IPPF is adjusting to the shifting landscape of sexual health needs with seven pleasure-filled commitments, including incorporating staff training on pleasure-based sexual health and working with The Pleasure Project to integrate pleasure into more of its sexual and reproductive health programmes. The organization will also ensure that pleasure is a guiding principle in its upcoming 2023-2028 organizational strategy. Marie-Evelyne-Petrus-Barry, Regional Director for IPPF Africa Region, said: "IPPF has always believed that pleasure is fundamental to well-being and that comprehensive sexual education globally must be drastically improved, stepping away from fear-based framing and stepping into one rooted in understanding sexual and reproductive health more holistically. "We also must be honest that most people, especially young people, do not just have sex for reproductive reasons, but have sex for pleasure. We must do more to help people understand the spectrum of pleasure so they can better understand their own needs and wants, and we hope, have a better, safer and healthier sex life." IPPF Africa Region has stepped up to the mark with the Treasure Your Pleasure digital campaign for young people, which has already sparked a conversation on sexual pleasure, sexual health and sexual rights on social media. More than 8 million people have viewed the content, which includes information about pleasure-based sex and relationships, sexual safety and consent, and more than 30,000 new people have followed the region on social media to learn more about their sexual health and wellbeing. IPPF plans to implement learnings from the campaign across other regions.   Anne Philpott, Founder of the Pleasure Project, said: "The Pleasure Project is delighted that IPPF has endorsed the Pleasure Principles. As the largest global provider of sexual and reproductive health services, it shines a light on this long stigmatized blind-spot in sexual health.  "Pleasure, love and desire are key reasons people have sex and relationships. Yet health services have been focused on stopping disease or preventing pregnancy for too long, limiting their appeal and impact. Our recent evidence review with the World Health Organization demonstrates that pleasure-inclusive sexual health improves sexual health and ultimately saves lives. "This commitment is not only critical in ensuring the more than 200 million essential services they provide every year are honest, sex-positive and effective but also that the people they serve are respected as wanting to live fulfilling lives. "We are excited to partner with IPPF to put their commitment into action with staff training, implementation of pleasure-based sexual health and learning lessons on how to best deliver this new evidence and pleasure-filled best practice." *** For media enquiries, please contact Karmen Ivey at [email protected] or Amina Khan on [email protected]   About the International Planned Parenthood Federation The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) is a global service provider and advocate of sexual and reproductive health and rights for all.   For over 65 years, IPPF, through its 118 Member Associations and 15 partners, has delivered high-quality sexual and reproductive healthcare and helped advance sexual rights, especially for people with intersectional and diverse needs that are currently unmet. Our Member Associations and partners are independent organizations that are locally owned, which means the support and care they provide is informed by local expertise and context. We advocate for a world where people are provided with the information they need to make informed decisions about their sexual health and bodies. We stand up and fight for sexual and reproductive rights and against those who seek to deny people their human right to bodily autonomy and freedom. We deliver care that is rooted in rights, respect, and dignity - no matter what. Notes to Editors World Sexual Health 2022 has the theme 'Let's talk pleasure' - find assets here   The full list of Pleasure Principles can be found on www.thepleasureproject.org and include: Love Yourself Embrace Learning Talk Sexy Be Flexible Think Universal Rights First Be Positive  A pleasure-based approach celebrates sex, sexuality and the joy and wellbeing derived from these and creates a vision of good sex built on sexual rights. It focuses on sensory, mental, physical and sensual pleasure to enable individuals to understand, consent to, and control their bodies and multi-faceted desires. Well-being, safety, pleasure, desire and joy are the objectives of a programme with a pleasure-based approach. This approach measures empowerment, agency, and self-efficacy by whether or not an individual has been enabled to know what they want and can ask for it and request this of others in relation to their sexuality, desires and pleasure. [ The Pleasure Project, 2019]   The full list of IPPF's commitments includes: At least two Member Associations commit to testing elements of the Pleasure Principles in their work Incorporate training of staff across the Federation on Pleasure Based Sexual Health and the evidence that supports it Look to expand the Treasure Your Pleasure Campaign by the Africa Regional Office to other regions and use the learnings to inform Pleasure based-content across all regions A specific module on advocacy for pleasure in the IPPF internal training modules To work with the Pleasure Project to better understand how to incorporate Pleasure into our programmes with a focus on youth To work with at least thee sex positive, pleasure-based influencers on social media content Continue to ensure Pleasure is a principal guiding the new IPPF Strategy 2023-2028  

Treasure your pleasure
media_center

| 28 November 2022

IPPF endorses pleasure-inclusive sexual health via the Pleasure Principles

IPPF is publicly committing to pleasure-inclusive sexual health and rights ahead of World Sexual Health Day by endorsing The Pleasure Project's Pleasure Principles Ahead of World Sexual Health Day on 4 September 2022, the theme of which is Let's talk pleasure, the world's largest sexual and reproductive healthcare organization, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), is publicly committing to pleasure-inclusive sexual health and rights (SRHR) by endorsing The Pleasure Project's Pleasure Principles. The seven principles, which include putting rights first, embracing learning, and loving yourself, promote a sex-positive, pleasure-based approach to sex and sexual health as opposed to standard prevention framing, which focuses only on avoiding pregnancy and sexually-transmitted infections (STIs). The Pleasure Principles are backed by new research with the World Health Organization, which shows that including sexual pleasure in sexual health education improves condom use compared to those that don't and increases knowledge and positive attitudes about sex, ultimately leading to better, safer sex and saving lives in the process. IPPF is adjusting to the shifting landscape of sexual health needs with seven pleasure-filled commitments, including incorporating staff training on pleasure-based sexual health and working with The Pleasure Project to integrate pleasure into more of its sexual and reproductive health programmes. The organization will also ensure that pleasure is a guiding principle in its upcoming 2023-2028 organizational strategy. Marie-Evelyne-Petrus-Barry, Regional Director for IPPF Africa Region, said: "IPPF has always believed that pleasure is fundamental to well-being and that comprehensive sexual education globally must be drastically improved, stepping away from fear-based framing and stepping into one rooted in understanding sexual and reproductive health more holistically. "We also must be honest that most people, especially young people, do not just have sex for reproductive reasons, but have sex for pleasure. We must do more to help people understand the spectrum of pleasure so they can better understand their own needs and wants, and we hope, have a better, safer and healthier sex life." IPPF Africa Region has stepped up to the mark with the Treasure Your Pleasure digital campaign for young people, which has already sparked a conversation on sexual pleasure, sexual health and sexual rights on social media. More than 8 million people have viewed the content, which includes information about pleasure-based sex and relationships, sexual safety and consent, and more than 30,000 new people have followed the region on social media to learn more about their sexual health and wellbeing. IPPF plans to implement learnings from the campaign across other regions.   Anne Philpott, Founder of the Pleasure Project, said: "The Pleasure Project is delighted that IPPF has endorsed the Pleasure Principles. As the largest global provider of sexual and reproductive health services, it shines a light on this long stigmatized blind-spot in sexual health.  "Pleasure, love and desire are key reasons people have sex and relationships. Yet health services have been focused on stopping disease or preventing pregnancy for too long, limiting their appeal and impact. Our recent evidence review with the World Health Organization demonstrates that pleasure-inclusive sexual health improves sexual health and ultimately saves lives. "This commitment is not only critical in ensuring the more than 200 million essential services they provide every year are honest, sex-positive and effective but also that the people they serve are respected as wanting to live fulfilling lives. "We are excited to partner with IPPF to put their commitment into action with staff training, implementation of pleasure-based sexual health and learning lessons on how to best deliver this new evidence and pleasure-filled best practice." *** For media enquiries, please contact Karmen Ivey at [email protected] or Amina Khan on [email protected]   About the International Planned Parenthood Federation The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) is a global service provider and advocate of sexual and reproductive health and rights for all.   For over 65 years, IPPF, through its 118 Member Associations and 15 partners, has delivered high-quality sexual and reproductive healthcare and helped advance sexual rights, especially for people with intersectional and diverse needs that are currently unmet. Our Member Associations and partners are independent organizations that are locally owned, which means the support and care they provide is informed by local expertise and context. We advocate for a world where people are provided with the information they need to make informed decisions about their sexual health and bodies. We stand up and fight for sexual and reproductive rights and against those who seek to deny people their human right to bodily autonomy and freedom. We deliver care that is rooted in rights, respect, and dignity - no matter what. Notes to Editors World Sexual Health 2022 has the theme 'Let's talk pleasure' - find assets here   The full list of Pleasure Principles can be found on www.thepleasureproject.org and include: Love Yourself Embrace Learning Talk Sexy Be Flexible Think Universal Rights First Be Positive  A pleasure-based approach celebrates sex, sexuality and the joy and wellbeing derived from these and creates a vision of good sex built on sexual rights. It focuses on sensory, mental, physical and sensual pleasure to enable individuals to understand, consent to, and control their bodies and multi-faceted desires. Well-being, safety, pleasure, desire and joy are the objectives of a programme with a pleasure-based approach. This approach measures empowerment, agency, and self-efficacy by whether or not an individual has been enabled to know what they want and can ask for it and request this of others in relation to their sexuality, desires and pleasure. [ The Pleasure Project, 2019]   The full list of IPPF's commitments includes: At least two Member Associations commit to testing elements of the Pleasure Principles in their work Incorporate training of staff across the Federation on Pleasure Based Sexual Health and the evidence that supports it Look to expand the Treasure Your Pleasure Campaign by the Africa Regional Office to other regions and use the learnings to inform Pleasure based-content across all regions A specific module on advocacy for pleasure in the IPPF internal training modules To work with the Pleasure Project to better understand how to incorporate Pleasure into our programmes with a focus on youth To work with at least thee sex positive, pleasure-based influencers on social media content Continue to ensure Pleasure is a principal guiding the new IPPF Strategy 2023-2028