- - -

HIV and STIs

The majority of HIV infections are sexually transmitted or are associated with pregnancy, childbirth and breastfeeding.  Our work links prevention with treatment, care and support, reduces HIV-related stigma and discrimination, and responds to unique regional and national characteristics of the epidemic.

Articles by HIV and STIs

Pan-African Women’s Organization
31 July 2020

IPPFAR Celebrates the Pan-African Women’s Day

Today, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) Africa Regional Office and its member associations joins the Pan African’s Woman Organization (PAWO) in celebrating the Pan-African Women’s Day. On this day, we recognize PAWO’s dedicated efforts in enhancing the lives of girls and women across the African continent. For over five decades, PAWO and its development partners have spearheaded various programmes and initiatives that have empowered thousands of African women, socially and politically. Indeed, these efforts have yielded positive results, as evidenced through notable positive changes in the status of African women as most, hold powerful leadership positions in different spaces. There is so much to celebrate; in politics, African women have demonstrated true leadership and have ably led successful democracies, literacy levels have increased significantly, and so have their economic statuses, where many run successful businesses or are employed. They continue to defy all odds by breaking various social, cultural, economic and political barriers to thrive in different fields. However, it is not enough, for women today are still under-represented in many areas. Many African women remain disadvantaged, underscoring the need for unity by actors in both the public and private sectors to be relentless in ensuring that women have an equal seat at the table. A lot more still needs to be done. IPPF Africa Region has been at the forefront of championing women’s rights – more so in reproductive health, with various women-centered and empowerment programs implemented in our Member Associations across the continent. The success of our work has been greatly enhanced through close collaboration and partnerships with different governments and organizations at the international, regional, national and local levels. The African Union and its partners, such as PAWO, continue to be some of our invaluable development allies. On this day, we congratulate PAWO on its 58th anniversary, and celebrate the work it continues to do in empowering African women. We reiterate our commitment to PAWO’s efforts in championing the women’s development agenda in the continent, and pledge our highest assurance of support to the organization.   Featured image: IPPF/Xaume Olleros/Senegal Media Contacts: -Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Officer, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) - Email: [email protected] -Sam Ntelamo, Resident Representative, International Planned Parenthood Federation, Liaison Office to the African Union & UNECA, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) – Phone: +251 (11) 667 0699/0761 - Mobile +251 (0) 944 73 2051- Email: [email protected]

World Population Day 2020
11 July 2020

World Population Day: Prioritization of Women and Girls During COVID-19 is Essential

Nairobi, 11 July 2020 - As we celebrate the World Population Day today, we are cognizant of the fact that it has come at a very difficult time. The world is coping with the devastating effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, and as is the case with most calamities, the poor and marginalized have been hardest hit. In response, governments have put in place various measures to contain the spread of the virus and while these have yielded some measure of positive results, they have also increased the vulnerability of some populations, such as women and girls. For example, the closure of schools has seen adolescent and teenage girls exposed to early child marriage, female genital mutilation, trafficking, child labor and other forms of exploitation. Staying home has also limited their access to comprehensive sexuality education, which has potential to contribute to teen pregnancies. Their exposure to sexual and gender-based violence during this time is imminent. Women largely depend on the informal economy for their livelihoods, but with the pandemic severely affecting their movement and their small businesses, they have been left economically exposed. Weak and overstretched health systems have seen governments divert most of their resources to mitigating the challenges of COVID-19. This has caused disruption of services in health facilities and affected the supply of commodities such as contraceptives and HIV drugs. Lockdowns and curfews have further aggravated the situation by limiting populations’ access to hospitals. Women can no longer easily visit their regular healthcare providers for their family planning needs. This could lead to unplanned pregnancies which may result increased cases of unsafe abortion. It has also become increasingly difficult for pregnant women to access antenatal, delivery and post-natal care services, putting them at greater risk for negative birth outcomes. As the world commemorates this important day, we implore governments and other stakeholders to recognize the gender dynamics during pandemics such as COVID-19, and work towards ensuring that women and girls have unhindered access to comprehensive sexual and reproductive health services. Media Contacts: -Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Officer, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) – Email: [email protected] -Sam Ntelamo, Resident Representative, International Planned Parenthood Federation, Liaison Office to the African Union & UNECA, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) – Phone: +251 (11) 667 0699/0761 - Mobile +251 (0) 944 73 2051- Email: [email protected]

	IPPF/Tommy Trenchard
25 June 2020

Community-Based Champions Addressing Sexual and Gender-Based Violence During COVID-19: Reproductive Health Uganda (RHU) pandemic

Women sexual and reproductive health (SRH) champions in Uganda are leading efforts to protect women and girls from sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) in their communities during the COVID-19 pandemic. As women leaders, they are uniquely placed to be agents change – working to break the silence and stigma around SGBV; changing harmful attitudes and behaviour; and promoting women’s and children’s rights. They are also well known and respected in their respective communities in Hoima (western region), Arua (northern region) and Kapchorwa (western region), so victims of abuse and domestic violence feel comfortable and safe turning to them for help. As in many other countries across the continent, Uganda has seen a significant rise in incidences of rape, defilement, and intimate partner violence since the government issued strict lockdown measures to contain the outbreak of COVID-19. The issue attracted national attention, when at the height of the lockdown in early May, President Yoweri Museveni in a televised address expressed his dismay at the increasing cases of domestic violence against women and children. The 113 SRH champions who include women pressure group leaders and peer educators were trained by IPPF’s member association in Uganda -Reproductive Health Uganda (RHU), on SGBV, women’s and children’s rights and how to support survivors in their communities. Through their networks, the champions identify and reach out to women and girls encountering physical, sexual and psychological violence, and support them by linking them to health facilities for care, counselling and psychosocial support, as well as to the police and legal services for redress. RHU provides the champions with airtime for their phones so that they can keep in touch and follow-up with the survivors of abuse and help them in their healing process. They also receive SMS and distress calls from victims of abuse at night, and many have had to provide them with temporary accommodation as they tried to resolve the conflicts in their relationships. The member association also facilitates talks shows with local radio stations – Radio Hoima (in Hoima), Elgon FM Radio 94.5 (in Kapchorwa) and Access Broadcasting FM (in Arua) where the champions engage in discussions around strategies for preventing domestic violence in their communities. They discuss the root causes of SGBV, its harmful consequences and the importance of promoting women’s and children’s rights. They also emphasize the crucial role of involving men in preventing GBV and the need for positive role models for men and boys in the community. Some of common topics covered during the radio shows include:  gender roles and division of labour in the home during the lockdown; the needs and rights of children; where to access GBV services during the pandemic; family planning and where they can get sexual reproductive health services during the lockdown. The talk shows are participatory and very popular with the audiences dialing in and asking questions. For more information about the work of IPPF Africa Region, follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Youth
18 May 2020

Protéger les droits des femmes et des filles pendant la pandémie du COVID-19

Par Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry La pandémie de COVID-19 continue à ravager le monde, causant des souffrances et une misère indicibles. Tout notre univers a été bouleversé en quelques mois. Des millions de personnes, en particulier les personnes âgées, sont tombées gravement malades; et des milliers d'autres, y compris des agents de santé, sont morts après avoir contracté le virus mortel. L'économie mondiale a littéralement été mise à genoux avec l'effondrement des entreprises, détruisant ainsi les moyens de subsistance des plus exclus et des plus démunis et les poussant vers  l'extrême pauvreté. On ne sait toujours pas comment le nouveau coronavirus, également connu sous le nom de virus SARS-Cov-2, est transmis en Afrique. Pour l'instant, le virus semble se propager à un rythme beaucoup plus lent qu'en Europe et aux États-Unis. Mais cela peut être largement dû au manque de tests généralisés. Selon l'Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS), le taux de transmission actuellement plus faible sur le continent se traduira très probablement par une épidémie prolongée sur plusieurs années. Les pays africains ont déjà commencé à assouplir les mesures, y compris les restrictions et les couvre-feux ce qui risque d’entrainer une forte hausse des taux d'infection répertoriés au cours des semaines à venir.  La crainte de contracter l’infection et d’en mourir, les difficultés financières, les pertes d'emplois et le sentiment d'impuissance ont bouleversé tous les aspects de la vie des Africains, particulièrement en ce qui concerne les femmes et les filles. Les femmes sont, dans une large mesure, plus durement touchées que les hommes par la crise en raison des normes patriarcales existantes, des rôles traditionnels basés sur le genre, des inégalités et de la discrimination profondément ancrées dans la culture. Ce sont les femmes qui portent le plus lourd fardeau de l'épidémie, car dans leurs rôles traditionnels de femmes au foyer, de mères et d'épouses, elles sont responsables de veiller à ce que la vie continue même si tout ce qui les entoure s'effondre. Dans leurs rôles de soutien et de dispensatrices de soins, les femmes doivent prendre soin des membres de la famille touchés par la maladie. Elles représentent également  la majorité des agents de santé dans les hôpitaux et sont exposées de manière disproportionnée à ce virus dévastateur. Lorsque toutes les ressources humaines et médicales disponibles, y compris les sages-femmes, sont déployées pour lutter contre l'épidémie du coronavirus, les femmes rencontrent d'énormes difficulté à accéder aux services de santé sexuelle et reproductive (SSR) et de santé maternelle essentiels à leur survie, ce qui les expose à un risque accru de grossesses non désirées. Le manque d’accès aux services de santé sexuelle et reproductive accroit le risque d’infection au VIH et autres maladies  sexuellement transmissibles, les avortements à risque et les décès lors de l'accouchement.  Les violences domestiques et basées sur le genre sont en forte augmentation et les recours, déjà difficiles en situation habituelle deviennent quasiment impossibles en période de pandémie, ce qui laisse présager un recul des grandes avancées qui avaient été faites dans ce domaine. Pourtant, la pandémie est plus qu'une urgence médicale. C'est aussi une crise sociale et économique. En Afrique, Plus de 75% des femmes vivent et survivent de l'économie informelle, soit comme vendeuses de rue, soit comme commerçantes du marché ou autres travaux précaires de subsistance. Beaucoup ne peuvent plus subvenir aux besoins de leur famille, car leurs petites entreprises ont été affectées par des mesures de prévention du coronavirus telles que les quarantaines, les confinements, les restrictions de voyage et la distanciation sociale. À bien des égards, la pandémie a amplifié les inégalités persistantes entre les sexes dans la société. Malheureusement, des progrès significatifs dans la promotion de l’égalité des sexes et des droits des femmes, y compris des gains durement acquis en matière de santé et de droits sexuels et reproductifs (SDSR) au cours des dernières décennies, sont en train de s’inverser. Cela souligne la nécessité urgente de sauvegarder ces acquis en s'attaquant à l'impact négatif disproportionné du COVID-19 sur la santé et le bien-être des femmes et des filles. Dans un effort pour garantir que les droits humains, l'égalité des sexes et les droits à la sante sexuelle et de la reproduction pour tous ne sont pas négligés pendant cette crise et ses conséquences, trois ONG internationales se sont engagées à faire progresser la défense, la protection et la promotion des droits humains pour tous sans discrimination – Le Bureau régional pour l’Afrique de la Fédération Internationale pour la Planification Familiale (IPPFRA), Amnesty International et Women's Link Worldwide - ont élaboré des directives pour aider les autorités et agences gouvernementales nationales et locales, ainsi que les organisations sous-régionales et régionales, à mieux comprendre leurs obligations et à mettre en œuvre des mesures adéquates en matière de droits des femmes et des filles pendant la pandémie. Les «Lignes directrices à l'intention des États africains pour protéger les droits des femmes et des filles pendant la pandémie de COVID 19» lancées le 7 mai 2020, soulignent également l’obligation des États de garantir le droit de vivre à l’abri de la discrimination et de la violence et appellent les gouvernements à garantir l’accès à  l’informations, aux produits de base et aux services essentiels en matière de santé sexuelle et reproductive pendant la pandémie. Les lignes directrices s'articulent autour de cinq piliers clés: le droit de vivre à l'abri de la violence et de ne pas être soumis à la torture ni à des traitements cruels, inhumains ou dégradants; L’accès aux services, produits et informations de santé sexuelle et reproductive; L’accès à la justice; l’accès à tous ces services pour les femmes et les filles se trouvant dans un contexte de migration et de mobilité humaine; La mise en œuvre de mesure de protection et de subsistance pour les femmes et les filles vivant de l'économie informelle. De toute évidence, les interventions collectives et coordonnées visant à atténuer la crise et à l’enrayer ne réussiront que si les voix des femmes sont incluses et que leurs droits fondamentaux sont respectés et garantis. Il s'agit d'une condition préalable à la construction d'un avenir post COVID-19 plus sain, plus juste et plus équitable pour tous. Marie-Evelyne Petrus Barry est la Directrice régionale, Bureau régional de l'IPPF Afrique, basé à Nairobi. E-mail: [email protected] Lisez cet article en anglais ici. Pour plus d'informations sur le travail de l'IPPF Région Afrique, suivez-nous sur Facebook et Twitter.

Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry
18 May 2020

Protecting the Rights of Women and Girls During the COVID-19 Pandemic

By Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry (Regional Director, IPPF Africa Region) The COVID-19 pandemic continues to ravage the world causing untold suffering and misery. The world has been turned upside down within a few months. Millions of people, particularly the elderly, have fallen critically ill; and thousands more, including health workers, have died after contracting the deadly virus. The world economy has literally been brought to its knees with businesses collapsing, destroying livelihoods and pushing many people into extreme poverty.  It is still unclear how the new coronavirus, also known as virus SARS-Cov-2 virus, is being transmitted in Africa. For now, the virus appears to be spreading at a much slower rate than in Europe and USA. But this may largely be due to lack of widespread testing. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the current lower rate of transmission on the continent will most likely translate into a more prolonged outbreak over several years. And as African countries start easing restrictions including lockdowns and curfews, infections rates are expected to rise sharply in the coming weeks. From fears of contracting and dying from the infection, financial worries, to job losses, and feeling of helplessness, the deadly disease has affected all aspects of life. Women, to a large extent, are more adversely affected than men by the crisis due to existing patriarchal norms, traditional gender roles, and deep-rooted inequalities. They bear the heaviest burden of the outbreak because in their traditional roles as homemakers, mothers, and wives, they are responsible for ensuring that life goes even as everything around them is falling apart. In their nurturing and caregiving roles, women have to take care of sick family members; and as the majority of health workers in hospitals; they are disproportionately exposed to the deadly virus. And when all available medical resources, including midwives, are deployed towards addressing the coronavirus  outbreak, women face enormous difficulties accessing essential life-saving sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and maternal health services, putting them at greater risk of unintended pregnancies, HIV and sexually transmitted infections, unsafe abortion and even death during childbirth.  And equally distressing is the reported increase in cases of gender-based violence. Yet the pandemic is more than a medical emergency. It is also a social and economic crisis. Over 75% of women in Africa eke out a living from the informal economy as street food vendors and market traders. Many can no longer provide for their families as their small enterprises have been affected by containment measures such as quarantines, lockdowns, travel restrictions and social distancing. In many ways, the pandemic has magnified persistent gender inequalities in society. And sadly, significant progress in advancing gender equality and women’s rights, including hard-won gains for sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) over the past decades, is being reversed. This underscores an urgent need to safeguard these gains by addressing the disproportionately negative impact of COVID-19 on the health and well-being of women and girls. In an effort to ensure human rights, gender equality and SRHR for all are not neglected during this crisis and in its aftermath, three international NGOs committed to advancing the enjoyment of human rights for all without discrimination – International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR), Amnesty International, and Women's Link Worldwide – developed guidelines to help national and local government authorities and agencies, as well as sub-regional and regional organizations, better understand the obligations they must fulfil with regard to women and girls' rights during the pandemic. The “Guidelines for African States to Protect the Rights of Women and Girls during the COVID 19 Pandemic,” launched on 7 May 2020, provide a roadmap for governments and regional organisations for taking the necessary measures to protect the rights of women and girls, who are often disproportionately affected in crisis situations. They also highlight states’ obligations to guarantee the right to live free from discrimination and violence and calls on governments to ensure access to essential sexual and reproductive health services, commodities and information during the pandemic. The guidelines revolve around five key pillars: The rights to live free from violence and to be free from torture and cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment; access to sexual and reproductive health services, commodities and information; access to justice; women and girls in the context of migration and human mobility; and women and informal economy. Clearly, collective and coordinated mitigation and recovery interventions will only succeed if women’s voices are included; and their fundamental rights are respected and guaranteed. This is a prerequisite for building a healthier, more equitable, fairer post COVID-19 future for all. Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry is the Regional Director, IPPF Africa Region based in Nairobi. E-mail: [email protected]   Read this article in French here. For more information about the work of IPPF Africa Region, follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

togo
14 May 2020

Riposte au Covid19- l’Association Togolaise Pour Le Bien-Etre Familial (ATBEF) sur tous les fronts

L’ATBEF compte parmi les Associations Membres de IPPF –Région Afrique qui ont bénéficié d’une attention particulière dans le cadre du renforcement de ses capacités et de l’augmentation de ses ressources destinées à la mise en œuvre de ses programmes, y compris ceux sensibles au genre et à la prise en charge complète des violences sexuelles.  Consolidée par ce soutien, l’Organisation a amélioré la qualité de sa réponse au niveau national. Dans le cadre de sa contribution à la riposte de la pandémie du Covid19, elle a mis en place une panoplie d’actions de mobilisation sociale et communautaire pour faire face à la recrudescence des violences sexuelles induites par la situation de confinement. Atteindre les couches les plus vulnérables L’ATBEF a intégré dans son plan de contingence, le renforcement des activités de sensibilisation au Covid19 et de prévention des VSBG, surtout en milieu communautaire. Cette sensibilisation couplée à des initiatives de résolution des conflits liés aux violences basées sur le genre est majoritairement entreprise dans les zones vulnérables où les populations à risques des quartiers défavorisés sont très peu touchées par les programmes traditionnels de promotion de la santé.  Ainsi la clinique mobile et les véhicules de l’Association ont été déployés pour couvrir les quartiers périphériques de Lomé tels que Gbadago, Ahanoukpoé et Agoè avec une attention soutenue pour les personnes réfugiées vivant dans un camp installé par le gouvernement et sous protection du HCR au quartier Avépozo. Les jeunes au cœur du changement Le programme Jeune de l’ATBEF avec le soutien de ses dynamiques membres du Mouvement d’Action des Jeunes a également été mis à contribution dans la confection des affiches de prévention des violences sexuelles basées sur le genre et dans la diffusion des messages d’incitation à la dénonciation des violences grâce à la mise en ligne des micro-vidéogrammes. L’accueil réservé à cette initiative et l’implication accrue des jeunes dans le relais des messages à travers les réseaux sociaux est une illustration parfaite de leur adhésion. Renforcer les partenariats stratégiques La protection et la sécurité des survivants(es) est un domaine essentiel dans l’approche multisectorielle de prise en charge des violences sexuelles basées sur le genre.  En cette période de COVID 19, L’ATBEF a entrepris de renforcer son partenariat avec les services judiciaires, les unités de protection et les agents de sécurité ainsi qu’avec les services de prise en charge psychosociale tels que le centre social de l’Etat à Novissi. La multiplication des cas durant ces deux derniers mois et la réponse rapide de l’ATBEF a renforcé les liens avec les services judiciaires. Ces derniers réfèrent ainsi les cas qui leur sont signalés vers l’ATBEF pour l’établissement des certificats médicaux appropriés. Les leçons d’une crise C’est désormais un constat largement partagé, le nombre de cas de violence sexuelles enregistrées depuis l’avènement du Covid19 a nettement augmenté, même au sein des cliniques de l’ATBEF où on est passé d’une une moyenne de 2-3 à 9-10 cas par mois, avec une un pourcentage élevé pour les cas de viols. Malgré la peur et la honte qui entourent la dénonciation, on peut noter que les actions intenses de sensibilisation ont un retour positif ; les survivantes se présentent et se signalent de plus en plus tôt et se font consulter dans un délai allant de  24 heures à 5 jours après l’agression. Ceci favorise une meilleure prise en charge, notamment la mise en place avec succès de la tri prophylaxie préconisée en cas de viol (AES, contraception d’urgence et azithromicine) L’ATBEF rencontre des défis pour se déployer comme la majorité des acteurs sur le terrain par ces temps de confinement. Mais à travers son réseau de communautaires, le dynamisme de ses jeunes volontaires et sa proximité avec les populations lui sont des atouts indéniables et le positionne comme un acteur incontournable au niveau national. https://atbeftogo.org/

drc
14 May 2020

RDC - les femmes prises au piège entre le Covid19 et les violences sexuelles…

La pandémie de COVID-19 déclarée par l’OMS est une épreuve pour le monde entier en général et pour la République Démocratique du Congo (RDC) également.   Depuis que le pays a enregistré son premier cas le 10 mars 2020 une série des mesures ont été prises en urgence par le Président de la République afin de limiter la propagation de la maladie, entre autres le confinement des populations. Le confinement comme mesure de prévention du Covid19 semble efficace pour contenir la maladie, mais s’est avéré malheureusement être un grand facteur de vulnérabilité pour de nombreuses femmes et filles qui voient ainsi leur destin basculer dans l’horreur de la violence. Depuis le début du confinement, on dénombre de plus en plus de cas de violences sexuelles et la peur s’est installée dans les familles. L’Association pour le Bien-être Familial – Naissances Désirables, (ABEF-ND) comme toutes les organisations œuvrant dans le domaine de la Santé de la Reproduction et Droits y afférents a réorganisé son fonctionnement et son mode de travail pour rester en conformité avec les mesures prises dans le cadre de la riposte mondiale et nationale. L’ABEF-ND a entamé une démarche de changement interne et des initiatives de collaboration avec les partenaires stratégiques externes pour rester fonctionnel et continuer à offrir un service de qualité aux populations : l’ABEF-ND a déclenché un « plan de travail de confinement » comme réponse à la pandémie de Covid19 pour une durée de 28 jours,  durant cette période, ABEF-ND fonctionnera en mode de Télétravail (Travail à distance) pour le personnel des services centraux et un service minimum avec rotations organisées est envisagé pour les prestataires cliniques dans les structures sanitaires propres de l'ABEF-ND, mais aussi chez les 17 structures sanitaires partenaires qui sont concernées par le plan de réponse de l’ABEF-ND à la crise du Covid19 En plus des 13 mesures phares énoncées par l’OMS et des différentes directives du gouvernement, l’ABEF-ND a également entrepris d’exiger de tous ses points des prestations de services, la mise en place d’un système destiné à garantir la continuité de l’offre de services aux survivants (es) des violences sexuelles basées sur le genre, tout respectant les mesures de sécurité, de qualité et de confidentialité nécessaires. Dans le cadre sa collaboration avec les services techniques du gouvernement, ABEF-ND a pris une part active aux travaux et aux différentes rencontres organisées dans le cadre de l’élaboration des "Directives en sante de la reproduction pour la prise en charge de la mère et du nouveau-né en situation de la pandémie au covid-19 en République Démocratique du Congo". Ce document clef met aussi un accent particulier sur la prise en charge des violences sexuelles basées sur le genre et vise à assurer l’offre de soins durant la pandémie du covid-19 sans compromettre les efforts du pays pour l’atteinte des objectifs de développement durable et plus particulièrement ceux de  la couverture sanitaire universelle Le langage des chiffres Depuis le 10 mars 2020, les Cliniques ABEF-ND et celles de ses partenaires ont reçu 275 cas de VBG parmi lesquels 169 filles, 102 femmes, 3 garçons et 1 homme[1]. La répartition des statistiques collectées est une illustration de plus de la vulnérabilité spécifique des filles, des jeunes et des femmes aux violences sexuelles et, c’est cette réalité cruelle que l’Organisation s’attèle à changer tous les jours dans son combat en prévention, réparation et contre l’impunité. En plus du maintien d’une prise en charge complète et gratuite des cas, diverses actions ont été entreprises par ABEF-ND dans le cas spécifique de cette crise :   La sensibilisation continue de son réseau de Distributeurs à Base Communautaire ( DBC) généralement mis à contribution dans les activités de prévention primaire et de suivi des phénomènes et interactions communautaires qui pourraient renforcer l’exposition aux VSBG et fragiliser la sécurité des femmes, des plus jeunes et des filles dans la communauté, Le maintien actif de son circuit de référencement des cas vers l’unité de police spéciale chargée de la lutte contre les violences sexuelles, y compris l’accompagnement vers les services sociaux ou les points de prise en charge judicaire, Le maintien du système de veille et d’alerte constitué de groupes de femmes et matrones des quartiers pour la détection précoce des cas et l’orientation vers les cliniques de l’ABEF-ND et partenaires, L’approvisionnement des cliniques et des structures partenaires en kit PEP et autres produits nécessaires à la prise en charge des VSBG, La mise en place d’une stratégie de prévention et de référencement des cas animée par les jeunes volontaires du Mouvement Action jeunes de ABEF-ND à travers les réseaux sociaux, L’animation des émissions radio télé sur la prise en charge des violences sexuelles, La distribution des masques et des solutions hydroalcooliques à tous les acteurs médicaux, para- médicaux et communautaires mis à contribution par ABEF-ND dans sa réponse de lutte contre les VSBG, Malgré les défis liés à la limitation des déplacements, les barrières psychologiques et culturelles qui sont alimentées par la peur d’être stigmatisé et le manque de moyens pour soutenir des actions en réparation, ABEF-ND avec l’appui de ses partenaires dont le plus constant reste l’IPPF continue de se déployer dans le pays et demeure un acteur incontournable dans la riposte nationale au Covid19, surtout en ce qui concerne la prise en charge complète des cas de violences sexuelles. Les services sont offerts gratuitement, sans discrimination, en toute confidentialité et sécurité. https://www.abefnd.org/ RECIT VECU Une fillette de 13 ans a été retrouvée par la police abandonnée par son ravisseur qui s’est servi de sa proximité avec l’enfant – dont il est le voisin- pour l’envoyer faire une commission non loin de leur lieu d’habitation à tous, avant de la séquestrer à son retour et de la violer de manière répétée et systématique  pendant deux jours. Les saignements abondants de la fillette ont poussé son bourreau à la jeter, la laissant pour morte. C’est dans cet état lamentable qu’elle a été retrouvée par les forces de l’ordre qui ont directement signalé son cas à l’Assemblé Nationale - Présidence du Parlement qui à son tour a référé l’adolescente pour une prise en charge médicale adéquate dans les services de l’ABEF-ND. ABEF-ND prendra les dispositions nécessaires avec ses partenaires pour proposer à la survivante et à sa famille des actions en réparation et une prise en charge psycho-sociale. [1] Données à jour au 4 mai 2020

guidelines on protection of women and girls
07 May 2020

Africa: Guidelines for Protecting the Rights of Women and Girls during the COVID-19 Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic — like all crises — will have a distinct impact on women and girls that is both immediate and that poses the risk of exacerbating pre-existing gender and other intersecting inequalities. Women and girls, particularly those who are already experiencing the greatest marginalization, will be disproportionately affected and, unless their rights are protected and their needs are met, will be further deprived of justice. The COVID-19 crisis does not relieve States of their obligations to address the gender-based violence faced by thousands of women and girls in the region; on the contrary, it requires more rigorous measures to minimize the negative impacts this new health crisis may have on them. This guide provides a roadmap for national and local government authorities and agencies, as well as sub-regional and regional organisations, to better understand the obligations they must fulfill as regards women and girls’ rights during the pandemic. The guide is the result of a collaboration between IPPF Africa Region, Women’s Link Worldwide, and Amnesty International, and is available in English and French. Download the guidelines (attached) in English and French.

Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry
21 April 2020

It's a RED CARD! Using Sport to Tackle Violence against Women and Girls

On 6 March 2020, the IPPF Africa Regional Director, Mrs. Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry attended the global launch of the Equal Light Red Card Campaign at the UN headquarters in New York. This is the speech given by Mrs. Petrus-Barry during the launch. The Red Card campaign is aimed at mobilizing the world to ensure that the voices of women and girls are heard across sectors, to elevate and strengthen them against others who seek to undermine their dignity, and to put an end to gender based violence and discrimination in every form. During the launch, IPPF Africa Region signed an MoU with African Renaissance and Diaspora Network (ARDN), as a new platform for the member associations and collaborative partners of the Africa region to operationalize gender normative frameworks and guidance as well as to shape and provide a comprehensive response for gender equality. Read more: Give A Red Card to All Forms of Discrimination and Violence Against Women and Girls! The "Red Card" campaign utilizes the unifying power of sport to provide an opportunity to governments, academia, civil society, the private sector, the general public, and other stakeholders to demonstrate to the world, and to their respective constituencies, their commitment and efforts towards achieving equality and equity for all, and to encourage their constituencies to become part of an international team dedicated to scoring Sustainable Development Goals.

Vidya-Charan
20 April 2020

Covid 19 - Non à la Violence à l’Egard de la Femme!

Par Vidya Charan  *Le COVID-19 -l’ennemi invisible a cruellement attaqué la vie quotidienne de l’être humain dans la plupart des pays du monde où 50 % de la population mondiale a été appelée à suivre les directives de l’Etat de garder la distance sociale et de vivre dans un confinement total.  Dans ce contexte, la maison, qui devrait être le lieu le plus protégé pour la femme et la fille, peut se transformer en un huis clos à haut risque. La vie quotidienne de l’être humain, l’économie, la culture, le social ont connu un arrêt soudain depuisle mois de mars – un mois pendant lequel le monde entier a rendu hommage à la femme dans le contexte de la Journée internationale de la femme. Un hommage pour sa contribution en tant qu’être humain à part entière, au travail, au foyer, dans des instances de décision et dans la communauté. Beaucoup de femmes sont engagées dans des secteurs informels et risquent leur vie pour subvenir aux besoins de leur famille même si elles font face à des inégalités en termes de ressources et d’aide.  Dans un monde dominé par le patriarcat, les femmes restent toujours vulnérables.  Plus de 220 millions de femmes dans le monde n’ont pas accès à la contraception ; cela met en péril une maternité saine car elles peuvent faire face à des grossesses non désirées. Avec le confinement et la distance sociale   qui aggravent la situation sociale et familiale, les femmes sont au premier plan pour soigner les personnes malades dans cette guerre mondiale déguisée. Par ailleurs, le confinement rend la femme dorénavant plus vulnérable dans une société où la violence domestique, physique, sexuelle, verbale, psychologique et économique  à leur égard est malheureusement présente dans toutes les couches de la société. Une telle violence est une épidémie mondiale qui tue, torture et mutile, physiquement, psychologiquement, sexuellement et économiquement. C'est une des violations des droits humains les plus répandues, qui prive les femmes et les filles de l'égalité, de la sécurité, de la dignité, de l'estime de soi, et de leur droit à jouir des libertés fondamentales.   Dans la République de Maurice, la violence envers les femmes a connu une ampleur choquante ces dernières années, les cas devenant de plus en plus dramatiques et les crimes de plus en plus odieux. Nous avons tous été récemment témoins de ces actes de violence aussi horribles et barbares contre les femmes. Ils ont ébranlé le cœur même de la société mauricienne car les criminels ne sont autres que des proches ou ceux qui ont vécu en intimité avec les victimes. Le nombre de cas fatals enregistrés depuis l’année dernière esttrès élevé, la majorité de victimes étant des femmes. Un tel niveau de violence ne doit pas être toléré avec 1,710 cas rapportés au ministère de l’Egalité du Genre en 2019 dont 7 décès des suites de violences domestique, sans compter les très nombreuses victimes qui subissent des violences graves mais non mortelles. Ces actes de violence sont perpétrés sans aucune distinction par rapport à l’âge, à la profession, à la culture et classe sociale. Les violences contre une mère de famille ou une grand-mère, une épouse, une sœur peuvent arriver parce que l’agresseur est sous l’influence de l’alcool, de la drogue, qu’il est jaloux, n’arrive pas à gérer les conflits relationnels et sentimentaux ou simplement qu’il croit que son pouvoir ébranlé au sein du ménage remettant en question l’honneur égocentrique masculin. Pendant cette triste période d’épidémie de COVID-19, que ce soit à Maurice ou dans le monde, il sera difficile de déterminer le nombre de cas de violences domestiques perpétués.  La violence à l'égard des femmes est due à de multiples facteurs et notamment une interdépendance de divers facteurs sociaux et culturels qui ont maintenu les femmes dans une condition où elles sont particulièrement vulnérables à la violence dirigée contre elles. Tous ces facteurs expriment les rapports de force historiquement inégaux entre hommes et femmes. Ils comprennent les mécanismes socio-économiques, des dysfonctionnements au sein de la famille où s'exercent les rapports de force, la peur et le contrôle de la sexualité féminine avec la conviction de la supériorité inhérente de l'homme.  Face à ces violations et discriminations persistantes qui continuent à porter atteinte aux droits fondamentaux des femmes et des filles, il est urgent de réaliser l’égalité entre hommes et femmes à laquelle les Etats se sont engagés en 1995 lors de la Conférence de Beijing car les partenaires abusifs profitent du confinement pour mieux abuser de leur partenaire. En cette période aussi difficile et critique, le Covid 19 a pris en assaut au niveau des certains services causant une rupture. L’Etat, le secteur privé et la société civile sont appelésà opérer dans des situations contraignantes. La MFPWA fonctionne à un rythme ralenti au vu des règlements établis et de la distanciation sociale. Cependant, nous avons mis à la disposition de nos bénéficiaires un service d’écoute et de conseil. Les cas difficiles sont référés à des services de santé du gouvernement et des cliniques privées. Au-delà du niveau local, la MFPWA, avec la collaboration du Help Age International et des ONGs africaines, a fait le plaidoyer pour le bien-être des personnes âgées et une communication régulière pour que celles-ci soient protégées. La MFPWA et son Women Advisory Panel appellent: A une remise en question des comportements, des normes et des attitudes qui légitiment et perpétuent la position subalterne des femmes dans toutes les sociétés dans le monde y compris à l’île Maurice, Rodrigues et Agaléga. Tous les responsables politiques et ceux du secteur privé à coopérer avec la société civile et les associations d'aide aux victimes pour changer les valeurs et les normes qui suscitent la violence à l'égard des femmes et des filles. A renforcer l’application de la loi qui existe par rapport aux violences domestique et le Protection Order qu’il faut revoir en urgence lorsque la situation sera revenueà la normale. A assurer la promotion de la hotline 139 que l’Etat a déjà mis au service de la population et à procurer aux victimes une protection et un hébergement en lieu sûr. Les tribunauxàtraiteren urgence les cas de violences. A favoriser l’utilisation des technologies modernes de communication et notamment de la télémédecine. A renforcer la vigilance de tous à savoir voisins, amis, familles, gouvernants et à dénoncer tout acte de violence. A ce que la collecte des données au niveau des services soit systématique et continue. Asensibiliser aux problèmesde violence domestique à l’égard des femmes et des enfants lors de la session de communication officielle quotidienne sur le Covid 19. L’histoire nous enseignera que l’épidémie de Covid 19 a été très cruelle mais en même temps nous a donné le temps de réflexionssur la façon dont nous opérons. Est-ce-que la logistique, le matériel et les aides que nous recevons et la structure de la société civile sont efficaceset suffisants pour faire face à ce type de viruset pour maintenir un fonctionnement normal? Est-ce que le fait de naître « fille » est un handicap dès le départ que devra porter une femme tout au long de sa vie? Nous demandons que justice soit faite aux victimes et leurs proches pendant ce combat contre l’épidémie de Covid-19. Beaucoup de femmes dans le secteur hospitalier et de la santé sont montées au créneau pour offrir leur service tout en mettant en péril leur vie bien qu’étant des épouses et des mères. La santéest au premier plan mais la sécurité dans toutes ses formes pour les victimes d’agression et d’abus va de pair. Nous nous inclinons devant toutes les victimes décédées mais nous nous levons pour dire « NON » à la violence envers les femmes!! *Cet article a été initialement publié dans L'Express, Mauritius. Vidya Charan est le Directrice Exécutive, Mauritius Family Planning & Welfare Association (MFPWA). La MFPWA bénéficie du soutien de l’Union européenne pour un projet de promotion de la santé maternelle saine pendant une période de quatre ans (2019-2022). Le projet fournit les services de la santé sexuelle et reproductive, en augmentant l’accès de la contraception et le conseil, le planning familial, pour les personnes les plus vulnérables. Le projet travaille également à la réhabilitation des enfants victimes d’abus sexuels, l’autonomisation des jeunes à travers l’éducation sexuelle et le screening des personnes pour les cancers des organes reproductifs. Le projet inclut également une importante composante de lutte contre la violence domestique.

Pan-African Women’s Organization
31 July 2020

IPPFAR Celebrates the Pan-African Women’s Day

Today, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) Africa Regional Office and its member associations joins the Pan African’s Woman Organization (PAWO) in celebrating the Pan-African Women’s Day. On this day, we recognize PAWO’s dedicated efforts in enhancing the lives of girls and women across the African continent. For over five decades, PAWO and its development partners have spearheaded various programmes and initiatives that have empowered thousands of African women, socially and politically. Indeed, these efforts have yielded positive results, as evidenced through notable positive changes in the status of African women as most, hold powerful leadership positions in different spaces. There is so much to celebrate; in politics, African women have demonstrated true leadership and have ably led successful democracies, literacy levels have increased significantly, and so have their economic statuses, where many run successful businesses or are employed. They continue to defy all odds by breaking various social, cultural, economic and political barriers to thrive in different fields. However, it is not enough, for women today are still under-represented in many areas. Many African women remain disadvantaged, underscoring the need for unity by actors in both the public and private sectors to be relentless in ensuring that women have an equal seat at the table. A lot more still needs to be done. IPPF Africa Region has been at the forefront of championing women’s rights – more so in reproductive health, with various women-centered and empowerment programs implemented in our Member Associations across the continent. The success of our work has been greatly enhanced through close collaboration and partnerships with different governments and organizations at the international, regional, national and local levels. The African Union and its partners, such as PAWO, continue to be some of our invaluable development allies. On this day, we congratulate PAWO on its 58th anniversary, and celebrate the work it continues to do in empowering African women. We reiterate our commitment to PAWO’s efforts in championing the women’s development agenda in the continent, and pledge our highest assurance of support to the organization.   Featured image: IPPF/Xaume Olleros/Senegal Media Contacts: -Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Officer, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) - Email: [email protected] -Sam Ntelamo, Resident Representative, International Planned Parenthood Federation, Liaison Office to the African Union & UNECA, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) – Phone: +251 (11) 667 0699/0761 - Mobile +251 (0) 944 73 2051- Email: [email protected]

World Population Day 2020
11 July 2020

World Population Day: Prioritization of Women and Girls During COVID-19 is Essential

Nairobi, 11 July 2020 - As we celebrate the World Population Day today, we are cognizant of the fact that it has come at a very difficult time. The world is coping with the devastating effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, and as is the case with most calamities, the poor and marginalized have been hardest hit. In response, governments have put in place various measures to contain the spread of the virus and while these have yielded some measure of positive results, they have also increased the vulnerability of some populations, such as women and girls. For example, the closure of schools has seen adolescent and teenage girls exposed to early child marriage, female genital mutilation, trafficking, child labor and other forms of exploitation. Staying home has also limited their access to comprehensive sexuality education, which has potential to contribute to teen pregnancies. Their exposure to sexual and gender-based violence during this time is imminent. Women largely depend on the informal economy for their livelihoods, but with the pandemic severely affecting their movement and their small businesses, they have been left economically exposed. Weak and overstretched health systems have seen governments divert most of their resources to mitigating the challenges of COVID-19. This has caused disruption of services in health facilities and affected the supply of commodities such as contraceptives and HIV drugs. Lockdowns and curfews have further aggravated the situation by limiting populations’ access to hospitals. Women can no longer easily visit their regular healthcare providers for their family planning needs. This could lead to unplanned pregnancies which may result increased cases of unsafe abortion. It has also become increasingly difficult for pregnant women to access antenatal, delivery and post-natal care services, putting them at greater risk for negative birth outcomes. As the world commemorates this important day, we implore governments and other stakeholders to recognize the gender dynamics during pandemics such as COVID-19, and work towards ensuring that women and girls have unhindered access to comprehensive sexual and reproductive health services. Media Contacts: -Maryanne Wanyama, Communications Officer, IPPFARO, Nairobi (Kenya) – Email: [email protected] -Sam Ntelamo, Resident Representative, International Planned Parenthood Federation, Liaison Office to the African Union & UNECA, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) – Phone: +251 (11) 667 0699/0761 - Mobile +251 (0) 944 73 2051- Email: [email protected]

	IPPF/Tommy Trenchard
25 June 2020

Community-Based Champions Addressing Sexual and Gender-Based Violence During COVID-19: Reproductive Health Uganda (RHU) pandemic

Women sexual and reproductive health (SRH) champions in Uganda are leading efforts to protect women and girls from sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) in their communities during the COVID-19 pandemic. As women leaders, they are uniquely placed to be agents change – working to break the silence and stigma around SGBV; changing harmful attitudes and behaviour; and promoting women’s and children’s rights. They are also well known and respected in their respective communities in Hoima (western region), Arua (northern region) and Kapchorwa (western region), so victims of abuse and domestic violence feel comfortable and safe turning to them for help. As in many other countries across the continent, Uganda has seen a significant rise in incidences of rape, defilement, and intimate partner violence since the government issued strict lockdown measures to contain the outbreak of COVID-19. The issue attracted national attention, when at the height of the lockdown in early May, President Yoweri Museveni in a televised address expressed his dismay at the increasing cases of domestic violence against women and children. The 113 SRH champions who include women pressure group leaders and peer educators were trained by IPPF’s member association in Uganda -Reproductive Health Uganda (RHU), on SGBV, women’s and children’s rights and how to support survivors in their communities. Through their networks, the champions identify and reach out to women and girls encountering physical, sexual and psychological violence, and support them by linking them to health facilities for care, counselling and psychosocial support, as well as to the police and legal services for redress. RHU provides the champions with airtime for their phones so that they can keep in touch and follow-up with the survivors of abuse and help them in their healing process. They also receive SMS and distress calls from victims of abuse at night, and many have had to provide them with temporary accommodation as they tried to resolve the conflicts in their relationships. The member association also facilitates talks shows with local radio stations – Radio Hoima (in Hoima), Elgon FM Radio 94.5 (in Kapchorwa) and Access Broadcasting FM (in Arua) where the champions engage in discussions around strategies for preventing domestic violence in their communities. They discuss the root causes of SGBV, its harmful consequences and the importance of promoting women’s and children’s rights. They also emphasize the crucial role of involving men in preventing GBV and the need for positive role models for men and boys in the community. Some of common topics covered during the radio shows include:  gender roles and division of labour in the home during the lockdown; the needs and rights of children; where to access GBV services during the pandemic; family planning and where they can get sexual reproductive health services during the lockdown. The talk shows are participatory and very popular with the audiences dialing in and asking questions. For more information about the work of IPPF Africa Region, follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Youth
18 May 2020

Protéger les droits des femmes et des filles pendant la pandémie du COVID-19

Par Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry La pandémie de COVID-19 continue à ravager le monde, causant des souffrances et une misère indicibles. Tout notre univers a été bouleversé en quelques mois. Des millions de personnes, en particulier les personnes âgées, sont tombées gravement malades; et des milliers d'autres, y compris des agents de santé, sont morts après avoir contracté le virus mortel. L'économie mondiale a littéralement été mise à genoux avec l'effondrement des entreprises, détruisant ainsi les moyens de subsistance des plus exclus et des plus démunis et les poussant vers  l'extrême pauvreté. On ne sait toujours pas comment le nouveau coronavirus, également connu sous le nom de virus SARS-Cov-2, est transmis en Afrique. Pour l'instant, le virus semble se propager à un rythme beaucoup plus lent qu'en Europe et aux États-Unis. Mais cela peut être largement dû au manque de tests généralisés. Selon l'Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS), le taux de transmission actuellement plus faible sur le continent se traduira très probablement par une épidémie prolongée sur plusieurs années. Les pays africains ont déjà commencé à assouplir les mesures, y compris les restrictions et les couvre-feux ce qui risque d’entrainer une forte hausse des taux d'infection répertoriés au cours des semaines à venir.  La crainte de contracter l’infection et d’en mourir, les difficultés financières, les pertes d'emplois et le sentiment d'impuissance ont bouleversé tous les aspects de la vie des Africains, particulièrement en ce qui concerne les femmes et les filles. Les femmes sont, dans une large mesure, plus durement touchées que les hommes par la crise en raison des normes patriarcales existantes, des rôles traditionnels basés sur le genre, des inégalités et de la discrimination profondément ancrées dans la culture. Ce sont les femmes qui portent le plus lourd fardeau de l'épidémie, car dans leurs rôles traditionnels de femmes au foyer, de mères et d'épouses, elles sont responsables de veiller à ce que la vie continue même si tout ce qui les entoure s'effondre. Dans leurs rôles de soutien et de dispensatrices de soins, les femmes doivent prendre soin des membres de la famille touchés par la maladie. Elles représentent également  la majorité des agents de santé dans les hôpitaux et sont exposées de manière disproportionnée à ce virus dévastateur. Lorsque toutes les ressources humaines et médicales disponibles, y compris les sages-femmes, sont déployées pour lutter contre l'épidémie du coronavirus, les femmes rencontrent d'énormes difficulté à accéder aux services de santé sexuelle et reproductive (SSR) et de santé maternelle essentiels à leur survie, ce qui les expose à un risque accru de grossesses non désirées. Le manque d’accès aux services de santé sexuelle et reproductive accroit le risque d’infection au VIH et autres maladies  sexuellement transmissibles, les avortements à risque et les décès lors de l'accouchement.  Les violences domestiques et basées sur le genre sont en forte augmentation et les recours, déjà difficiles en situation habituelle deviennent quasiment impossibles en période de pandémie, ce qui laisse présager un recul des grandes avancées qui avaient été faites dans ce domaine. Pourtant, la pandémie est plus qu'une urgence médicale. C'est aussi une crise sociale et économique. En Afrique, Plus de 75% des femmes vivent et survivent de l'économie informelle, soit comme vendeuses de rue, soit comme commerçantes du marché ou autres travaux précaires de subsistance. Beaucoup ne peuvent plus subvenir aux besoins de leur famille, car leurs petites entreprises ont été affectées par des mesures de prévention du coronavirus telles que les quarantaines, les confinements, les restrictions de voyage et la distanciation sociale. À bien des égards, la pandémie a amplifié les inégalités persistantes entre les sexes dans la société. Malheureusement, des progrès significatifs dans la promotion de l’égalité des sexes et des droits des femmes, y compris des gains durement acquis en matière de santé et de droits sexuels et reproductifs (SDSR) au cours des dernières décennies, sont en train de s’inverser. Cela souligne la nécessité urgente de sauvegarder ces acquis en s'attaquant à l'impact négatif disproportionné du COVID-19 sur la santé et le bien-être des femmes et des filles. Dans un effort pour garantir que les droits humains, l'égalité des sexes et les droits à la sante sexuelle et de la reproduction pour tous ne sont pas négligés pendant cette crise et ses conséquences, trois ONG internationales se sont engagées à faire progresser la défense, la protection et la promotion des droits humains pour tous sans discrimination – Le Bureau régional pour l’Afrique de la Fédération Internationale pour la Planification Familiale (IPPFRA), Amnesty International et Women's Link Worldwide - ont élaboré des directives pour aider les autorités et agences gouvernementales nationales et locales, ainsi que les organisations sous-régionales et régionales, à mieux comprendre leurs obligations et à mettre en œuvre des mesures adéquates en matière de droits des femmes et des filles pendant la pandémie. Les «Lignes directrices à l'intention des États africains pour protéger les droits des femmes et des filles pendant la pandémie de COVID 19» lancées le 7 mai 2020, soulignent également l’obligation des États de garantir le droit de vivre à l’abri de la discrimination et de la violence et appellent les gouvernements à garantir l’accès à  l’informations, aux produits de base et aux services essentiels en matière de santé sexuelle et reproductive pendant la pandémie. Les lignes directrices s'articulent autour de cinq piliers clés: le droit de vivre à l'abri de la violence et de ne pas être soumis à la torture ni à des traitements cruels, inhumains ou dégradants; L’accès aux services, produits et informations de santé sexuelle et reproductive; L’accès à la justice; l’accès à tous ces services pour les femmes et les filles se trouvant dans un contexte de migration et de mobilité humaine; La mise en œuvre de mesure de protection et de subsistance pour les femmes et les filles vivant de l'économie informelle. De toute évidence, les interventions collectives et coordonnées visant à atténuer la crise et à l’enrayer ne réussiront que si les voix des femmes sont incluses et que leurs droits fondamentaux sont respectés et garantis. Il s'agit d'une condition préalable à la construction d'un avenir post COVID-19 plus sain, plus juste et plus équitable pour tous. Marie-Evelyne Petrus Barry est la Directrice régionale, Bureau régional de l'IPPF Afrique, basé à Nairobi. E-mail: [email protected] Lisez cet article en anglais ici. Pour plus d'informations sur le travail de l'IPPF Région Afrique, suivez-nous sur Facebook et Twitter.

Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry
18 May 2020

Protecting the Rights of Women and Girls During the COVID-19 Pandemic

By Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry (Regional Director, IPPF Africa Region) The COVID-19 pandemic continues to ravage the world causing untold suffering and misery. The world has been turned upside down within a few months. Millions of people, particularly the elderly, have fallen critically ill; and thousands more, including health workers, have died after contracting the deadly virus. The world economy has literally been brought to its knees with businesses collapsing, destroying livelihoods and pushing many people into extreme poverty.  It is still unclear how the new coronavirus, also known as virus SARS-Cov-2 virus, is being transmitted in Africa. For now, the virus appears to be spreading at a much slower rate than in Europe and USA. But this may largely be due to lack of widespread testing. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the current lower rate of transmission on the continent will most likely translate into a more prolonged outbreak over several years. And as African countries start easing restrictions including lockdowns and curfews, infections rates are expected to rise sharply in the coming weeks. From fears of contracting and dying from the infection, financial worries, to job losses, and feeling of helplessness, the deadly disease has affected all aspects of life. Women, to a large extent, are more adversely affected than men by the crisis due to existing patriarchal norms, traditional gender roles, and deep-rooted inequalities. They bear the heaviest burden of the outbreak because in their traditional roles as homemakers, mothers, and wives, they are responsible for ensuring that life goes even as everything around them is falling apart. In their nurturing and caregiving roles, women have to take care of sick family members; and as the majority of health workers in hospitals; they are disproportionately exposed to the deadly virus. And when all available medical resources, including midwives, are deployed towards addressing the coronavirus  outbreak, women face enormous difficulties accessing essential life-saving sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and maternal health services, putting them at greater risk of unintended pregnancies, HIV and sexually transmitted infections, unsafe abortion and even death during childbirth.  And equally distressing is the reported increase in cases of gender-based violence. Yet the pandemic is more than a medical emergency. It is also a social and economic crisis. Over 75% of women in Africa eke out a living from the informal economy as street food vendors and market traders. Many can no longer provide for their families as their small enterprises have been affected by containment measures such as quarantines, lockdowns, travel restrictions and social distancing. In many ways, the pandemic has magnified persistent gender inequalities in society. And sadly, significant progress in advancing gender equality and women’s rights, including hard-won gains for sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) over the past decades, is being reversed. This underscores an urgent need to safeguard these gains by addressing the disproportionately negative impact of COVID-19 on the health and well-being of women and girls. In an effort to ensure human rights, gender equality and SRHR for all are not neglected during this crisis and in its aftermath, three international NGOs committed to advancing the enjoyment of human rights for all without discrimination – International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR), Amnesty International, and Women's Link Worldwide – developed guidelines to help national and local government authorities and agencies, as well as sub-regional and regional organizations, better understand the obligations they must fulfil with regard to women and girls' rights during the pandemic. The “Guidelines for African States to Protect the Rights of Women and Girls during the COVID 19 Pandemic,” launched on 7 May 2020, provide a roadmap for governments and regional organisations for taking the necessary measures to protect the rights of women and girls, who are often disproportionately affected in crisis situations. They also highlight states’ obligations to guarantee the right to live free from discrimination and violence and calls on governments to ensure access to essential sexual and reproductive health services, commodities and information during the pandemic. The guidelines revolve around five key pillars: The rights to live free from violence and to be free from torture and cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment; access to sexual and reproductive health services, commodities and information; access to justice; women and girls in the context of migration and human mobility; and women and informal economy. Clearly, collective and coordinated mitigation and recovery interventions will only succeed if women’s voices are included; and their fundamental rights are respected and guaranteed. This is a prerequisite for building a healthier, more equitable, fairer post COVID-19 future for all. Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry is the Regional Director, IPPF Africa Region based in Nairobi. E-mail: [email protected]   Read this article in French here. For more information about the work of IPPF Africa Region, follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

togo
14 May 2020

Riposte au Covid19- l’Association Togolaise Pour Le Bien-Etre Familial (ATBEF) sur tous les fronts

L’ATBEF compte parmi les Associations Membres de IPPF –Région Afrique qui ont bénéficié d’une attention particulière dans le cadre du renforcement de ses capacités et de l’augmentation de ses ressources destinées à la mise en œuvre de ses programmes, y compris ceux sensibles au genre et à la prise en charge complète des violences sexuelles.  Consolidée par ce soutien, l’Organisation a amélioré la qualité de sa réponse au niveau national. Dans le cadre de sa contribution à la riposte de la pandémie du Covid19, elle a mis en place une panoplie d’actions de mobilisation sociale et communautaire pour faire face à la recrudescence des violences sexuelles induites par la situation de confinement. Atteindre les couches les plus vulnérables L’ATBEF a intégré dans son plan de contingence, le renforcement des activités de sensibilisation au Covid19 et de prévention des VSBG, surtout en milieu communautaire. Cette sensibilisation couplée à des initiatives de résolution des conflits liés aux violences basées sur le genre est majoritairement entreprise dans les zones vulnérables où les populations à risques des quartiers défavorisés sont très peu touchées par les programmes traditionnels de promotion de la santé.  Ainsi la clinique mobile et les véhicules de l’Association ont été déployés pour couvrir les quartiers périphériques de Lomé tels que Gbadago, Ahanoukpoé et Agoè avec une attention soutenue pour les personnes réfugiées vivant dans un camp installé par le gouvernement et sous protection du HCR au quartier Avépozo. Les jeunes au cœur du changement Le programme Jeune de l’ATBEF avec le soutien de ses dynamiques membres du Mouvement d’Action des Jeunes a également été mis à contribution dans la confection des affiches de prévention des violences sexuelles basées sur le genre et dans la diffusion des messages d’incitation à la dénonciation des violences grâce à la mise en ligne des micro-vidéogrammes. L’accueil réservé à cette initiative et l’implication accrue des jeunes dans le relais des messages à travers les réseaux sociaux est une illustration parfaite de leur adhésion. Renforcer les partenariats stratégiques La protection et la sécurité des survivants(es) est un domaine essentiel dans l’approche multisectorielle de prise en charge des violences sexuelles basées sur le genre.  En cette période de COVID 19, L’ATBEF a entrepris de renforcer son partenariat avec les services judiciaires, les unités de protection et les agents de sécurité ainsi qu’avec les services de prise en charge psychosociale tels que le centre social de l’Etat à Novissi. La multiplication des cas durant ces deux derniers mois et la réponse rapide de l’ATBEF a renforcé les liens avec les services judiciaires. Ces derniers réfèrent ainsi les cas qui leur sont signalés vers l’ATBEF pour l’établissement des certificats médicaux appropriés. Les leçons d’une crise C’est désormais un constat largement partagé, le nombre de cas de violence sexuelles enregistrées depuis l’avènement du Covid19 a nettement augmenté, même au sein des cliniques de l’ATBEF où on est passé d’une une moyenne de 2-3 à 9-10 cas par mois, avec une un pourcentage élevé pour les cas de viols. Malgré la peur et la honte qui entourent la dénonciation, on peut noter que les actions intenses de sensibilisation ont un retour positif ; les survivantes se présentent et se signalent de plus en plus tôt et se font consulter dans un délai allant de  24 heures à 5 jours après l’agression. Ceci favorise une meilleure prise en charge, notamment la mise en place avec succès de la tri prophylaxie préconisée en cas de viol (AES, contraception d’urgence et azithromicine) L’ATBEF rencontre des défis pour se déployer comme la majorité des acteurs sur le terrain par ces temps de confinement. Mais à travers son réseau de communautaires, le dynamisme de ses jeunes volontaires et sa proximité avec les populations lui sont des atouts indéniables et le positionne comme un acteur incontournable au niveau national. https://atbeftogo.org/

drc
14 May 2020

RDC - les femmes prises au piège entre le Covid19 et les violences sexuelles…

La pandémie de COVID-19 déclarée par l’OMS est une épreuve pour le monde entier en général et pour la République Démocratique du Congo (RDC) également.   Depuis que le pays a enregistré son premier cas le 10 mars 2020 une série des mesures ont été prises en urgence par le Président de la République afin de limiter la propagation de la maladie, entre autres le confinement des populations. Le confinement comme mesure de prévention du Covid19 semble efficace pour contenir la maladie, mais s’est avéré malheureusement être un grand facteur de vulnérabilité pour de nombreuses femmes et filles qui voient ainsi leur destin basculer dans l’horreur de la violence. Depuis le début du confinement, on dénombre de plus en plus de cas de violences sexuelles et la peur s’est installée dans les familles. L’Association pour le Bien-être Familial – Naissances Désirables, (ABEF-ND) comme toutes les organisations œuvrant dans le domaine de la Santé de la Reproduction et Droits y afférents a réorganisé son fonctionnement et son mode de travail pour rester en conformité avec les mesures prises dans le cadre de la riposte mondiale et nationale. L’ABEF-ND a entamé une démarche de changement interne et des initiatives de collaboration avec les partenaires stratégiques externes pour rester fonctionnel et continuer à offrir un service de qualité aux populations : l’ABEF-ND a déclenché un « plan de travail de confinement » comme réponse à la pandémie de Covid19 pour une durée de 28 jours,  durant cette période, ABEF-ND fonctionnera en mode de Télétravail (Travail à distance) pour le personnel des services centraux et un service minimum avec rotations organisées est envisagé pour les prestataires cliniques dans les structures sanitaires propres de l'ABEF-ND, mais aussi chez les 17 structures sanitaires partenaires qui sont concernées par le plan de réponse de l’ABEF-ND à la crise du Covid19 En plus des 13 mesures phares énoncées par l’OMS et des différentes directives du gouvernement, l’ABEF-ND a également entrepris d’exiger de tous ses points des prestations de services, la mise en place d’un système destiné à garantir la continuité de l’offre de services aux survivants (es) des violences sexuelles basées sur le genre, tout respectant les mesures de sécurité, de qualité et de confidentialité nécessaires. Dans le cadre sa collaboration avec les services techniques du gouvernement, ABEF-ND a pris une part active aux travaux et aux différentes rencontres organisées dans le cadre de l’élaboration des "Directives en sante de la reproduction pour la prise en charge de la mère et du nouveau-né en situation de la pandémie au covid-19 en République Démocratique du Congo". Ce document clef met aussi un accent particulier sur la prise en charge des violences sexuelles basées sur le genre et vise à assurer l’offre de soins durant la pandémie du covid-19 sans compromettre les efforts du pays pour l’atteinte des objectifs de développement durable et plus particulièrement ceux de  la couverture sanitaire universelle Le langage des chiffres Depuis le 10 mars 2020, les Cliniques ABEF-ND et celles de ses partenaires ont reçu 275 cas de VBG parmi lesquels 169 filles, 102 femmes, 3 garçons et 1 homme[1]. La répartition des statistiques collectées est une illustration de plus de la vulnérabilité spécifique des filles, des jeunes et des femmes aux violences sexuelles et, c’est cette réalité cruelle que l’Organisation s’attèle à changer tous les jours dans son combat en prévention, réparation et contre l’impunité. En plus du maintien d’une prise en charge complète et gratuite des cas, diverses actions ont été entreprises par ABEF-ND dans le cas spécifique de cette crise :   La sensibilisation continue de son réseau de Distributeurs à Base Communautaire ( DBC) généralement mis à contribution dans les activités de prévention primaire et de suivi des phénomènes et interactions communautaires qui pourraient renforcer l’exposition aux VSBG et fragiliser la sécurité des femmes, des plus jeunes et des filles dans la communauté, Le maintien actif de son circuit de référencement des cas vers l’unité de police spéciale chargée de la lutte contre les violences sexuelles, y compris l’accompagnement vers les services sociaux ou les points de prise en charge judicaire, Le maintien du système de veille et d’alerte constitué de groupes de femmes et matrones des quartiers pour la détection précoce des cas et l’orientation vers les cliniques de l’ABEF-ND et partenaires, L’approvisionnement des cliniques et des structures partenaires en kit PEP et autres produits nécessaires à la prise en charge des VSBG, La mise en place d’une stratégie de prévention et de référencement des cas animée par les jeunes volontaires du Mouvement Action jeunes de ABEF-ND à travers les réseaux sociaux, L’animation des émissions radio télé sur la prise en charge des violences sexuelles, La distribution des masques et des solutions hydroalcooliques à tous les acteurs médicaux, para- médicaux et communautaires mis à contribution par ABEF-ND dans sa réponse de lutte contre les VSBG, Malgré les défis liés à la limitation des déplacements, les barrières psychologiques et culturelles qui sont alimentées par la peur d’être stigmatisé et le manque de moyens pour soutenir des actions en réparation, ABEF-ND avec l’appui de ses partenaires dont le plus constant reste l’IPPF continue de se déployer dans le pays et demeure un acteur incontournable dans la riposte nationale au Covid19, surtout en ce qui concerne la prise en charge complète des cas de violences sexuelles. Les services sont offerts gratuitement, sans discrimination, en toute confidentialité et sécurité. https://www.abefnd.org/ RECIT VECU Une fillette de 13 ans a été retrouvée par la police abandonnée par son ravisseur qui s’est servi de sa proximité avec l’enfant – dont il est le voisin- pour l’envoyer faire une commission non loin de leur lieu d’habitation à tous, avant de la séquestrer à son retour et de la violer de manière répétée et systématique  pendant deux jours. Les saignements abondants de la fillette ont poussé son bourreau à la jeter, la laissant pour morte. C’est dans cet état lamentable qu’elle a été retrouvée par les forces de l’ordre qui ont directement signalé son cas à l’Assemblé Nationale - Présidence du Parlement qui à son tour a référé l’adolescente pour une prise en charge médicale adéquate dans les services de l’ABEF-ND. ABEF-ND prendra les dispositions nécessaires avec ses partenaires pour proposer à la survivante et à sa famille des actions en réparation et une prise en charge psycho-sociale. [1] Données à jour au 4 mai 2020

guidelines on protection of women and girls
07 May 2020

Africa: Guidelines for Protecting the Rights of Women and Girls during the COVID-19 Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic — like all crises — will have a distinct impact on women and girls that is both immediate and that poses the risk of exacerbating pre-existing gender and other intersecting inequalities. Women and girls, particularly those who are already experiencing the greatest marginalization, will be disproportionately affected and, unless their rights are protected and their needs are met, will be further deprived of justice. The COVID-19 crisis does not relieve States of their obligations to address the gender-based violence faced by thousands of women and girls in the region; on the contrary, it requires more rigorous measures to minimize the negative impacts this new health crisis may have on them. This guide provides a roadmap for national and local government authorities and agencies, as well as sub-regional and regional organisations, to better understand the obligations they must fulfill as regards women and girls’ rights during the pandemic. The guide is the result of a collaboration between IPPF Africa Region, Women’s Link Worldwide, and Amnesty International, and is available in English and French. Download the guidelines (attached) in English and French.

Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry
21 April 2020

It's a RED CARD! Using Sport to Tackle Violence against Women and Girls

On 6 March 2020, the IPPF Africa Regional Director, Mrs. Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry attended the global launch of the Equal Light Red Card Campaign at the UN headquarters in New York. This is the speech given by Mrs. Petrus-Barry during the launch. The Red Card campaign is aimed at mobilizing the world to ensure that the voices of women and girls are heard across sectors, to elevate and strengthen them against others who seek to undermine their dignity, and to put an end to gender based violence and discrimination in every form. During the launch, IPPF Africa Region signed an MoU with African Renaissance and Diaspora Network (ARDN), as a new platform for the member associations and collaborative partners of the Africa region to operationalize gender normative frameworks and guidance as well as to shape and provide a comprehensive response for gender equality. Read more: Give A Red Card to All Forms of Discrimination and Violence Against Women and Girls! The "Red Card" campaign utilizes the unifying power of sport to provide an opportunity to governments, academia, civil society, the private sector, the general public, and other stakeholders to demonstrate to the world, and to their respective constituencies, their commitment and efforts towards achieving equality and equity for all, and to encourage their constituencies to become part of an international team dedicated to scoring Sustainable Development Goals.

Vidya-Charan
20 April 2020

Covid 19 - Non à la Violence à l’Egard de la Femme!

Par Vidya Charan  *Le COVID-19 -l’ennemi invisible a cruellement attaqué la vie quotidienne de l’être humain dans la plupart des pays du monde où 50 % de la population mondiale a été appelée à suivre les directives de l’Etat de garder la distance sociale et de vivre dans un confinement total.  Dans ce contexte, la maison, qui devrait être le lieu le plus protégé pour la femme et la fille, peut se transformer en un huis clos à haut risque. La vie quotidienne de l’être humain, l’économie, la culture, le social ont connu un arrêt soudain depuisle mois de mars – un mois pendant lequel le monde entier a rendu hommage à la femme dans le contexte de la Journée internationale de la femme. Un hommage pour sa contribution en tant qu’être humain à part entière, au travail, au foyer, dans des instances de décision et dans la communauté. Beaucoup de femmes sont engagées dans des secteurs informels et risquent leur vie pour subvenir aux besoins de leur famille même si elles font face à des inégalités en termes de ressources et d’aide.  Dans un monde dominé par le patriarcat, les femmes restent toujours vulnérables.  Plus de 220 millions de femmes dans le monde n’ont pas accès à la contraception ; cela met en péril une maternité saine car elles peuvent faire face à des grossesses non désirées. Avec le confinement et la distance sociale   qui aggravent la situation sociale et familiale, les femmes sont au premier plan pour soigner les personnes malades dans cette guerre mondiale déguisée. Par ailleurs, le confinement rend la femme dorénavant plus vulnérable dans une société où la violence domestique, physique, sexuelle, verbale, psychologique et économique  à leur égard est malheureusement présente dans toutes les couches de la société. Une telle violence est une épidémie mondiale qui tue, torture et mutile, physiquement, psychologiquement, sexuellement et économiquement. C'est une des violations des droits humains les plus répandues, qui prive les femmes et les filles de l'égalité, de la sécurité, de la dignité, de l'estime de soi, et de leur droit à jouir des libertés fondamentales.   Dans la République de Maurice, la violence envers les femmes a connu une ampleur choquante ces dernières années, les cas devenant de plus en plus dramatiques et les crimes de plus en plus odieux. Nous avons tous été récemment témoins de ces actes de violence aussi horribles et barbares contre les femmes. Ils ont ébranlé le cœur même de la société mauricienne car les criminels ne sont autres que des proches ou ceux qui ont vécu en intimité avec les victimes. Le nombre de cas fatals enregistrés depuis l’année dernière esttrès élevé, la majorité de victimes étant des femmes. Un tel niveau de violence ne doit pas être toléré avec 1,710 cas rapportés au ministère de l’Egalité du Genre en 2019 dont 7 décès des suites de violences domestique, sans compter les très nombreuses victimes qui subissent des violences graves mais non mortelles. Ces actes de violence sont perpétrés sans aucune distinction par rapport à l’âge, à la profession, à la culture et classe sociale. Les violences contre une mère de famille ou une grand-mère, une épouse, une sœur peuvent arriver parce que l’agresseur est sous l’influence de l’alcool, de la drogue, qu’il est jaloux, n’arrive pas à gérer les conflits relationnels et sentimentaux ou simplement qu’il croit que son pouvoir ébranlé au sein du ménage remettant en question l’honneur égocentrique masculin. Pendant cette triste période d’épidémie de COVID-19, que ce soit à Maurice ou dans le monde, il sera difficile de déterminer le nombre de cas de violences domestiques perpétués.  La violence à l'égard des femmes est due à de multiples facteurs et notamment une interdépendance de divers facteurs sociaux et culturels qui ont maintenu les femmes dans une condition où elles sont particulièrement vulnérables à la violence dirigée contre elles. Tous ces facteurs expriment les rapports de force historiquement inégaux entre hommes et femmes. Ils comprennent les mécanismes socio-économiques, des dysfonctionnements au sein de la famille où s'exercent les rapports de force, la peur et le contrôle de la sexualité féminine avec la conviction de la supériorité inhérente de l'homme.  Face à ces violations et discriminations persistantes qui continuent à porter atteinte aux droits fondamentaux des femmes et des filles, il est urgent de réaliser l’égalité entre hommes et femmes à laquelle les Etats se sont engagés en 1995 lors de la Conférence de Beijing car les partenaires abusifs profitent du confinement pour mieux abuser de leur partenaire. En cette période aussi difficile et critique, le Covid 19 a pris en assaut au niveau des certains services causant une rupture. L’Etat, le secteur privé et la société civile sont appelésà opérer dans des situations contraignantes. La MFPWA fonctionne à un rythme ralenti au vu des règlements établis et de la distanciation sociale. Cependant, nous avons mis à la disposition de nos bénéficiaires un service d’écoute et de conseil. Les cas difficiles sont référés à des services de santé du gouvernement et des cliniques privées. Au-delà du niveau local, la MFPWA, avec la collaboration du Help Age International et des ONGs africaines, a fait le plaidoyer pour le bien-être des personnes âgées et une communication régulière pour que celles-ci soient protégées. La MFPWA et son Women Advisory Panel appellent: A une remise en question des comportements, des normes et des attitudes qui légitiment et perpétuent la position subalterne des femmes dans toutes les sociétés dans le monde y compris à l’île Maurice, Rodrigues et Agaléga. Tous les responsables politiques et ceux du secteur privé à coopérer avec la société civile et les associations d'aide aux victimes pour changer les valeurs et les normes qui suscitent la violence à l'égard des femmes et des filles. A renforcer l’application de la loi qui existe par rapport aux violences domestique et le Protection Order qu’il faut revoir en urgence lorsque la situation sera revenueà la normale. A assurer la promotion de la hotline 139 que l’Etat a déjà mis au service de la population et à procurer aux victimes une protection et un hébergement en lieu sûr. Les tribunauxàtraiteren urgence les cas de violences. A favoriser l’utilisation des technologies modernes de communication et notamment de la télémédecine. A renforcer la vigilance de tous à savoir voisins, amis, familles, gouvernants et à dénoncer tout acte de violence. A ce que la collecte des données au niveau des services soit systématique et continue. Asensibiliser aux problèmesde violence domestique à l’égard des femmes et des enfants lors de la session de communication officielle quotidienne sur le Covid 19. L’histoire nous enseignera que l’épidémie de Covid 19 a été très cruelle mais en même temps nous a donné le temps de réflexionssur la façon dont nous opérons. Est-ce-que la logistique, le matériel et les aides que nous recevons et la structure de la société civile sont efficaceset suffisants pour faire face à ce type de viruset pour maintenir un fonctionnement normal? Est-ce que le fait de naître « fille » est un handicap dès le départ que devra porter une femme tout au long de sa vie? Nous demandons que justice soit faite aux victimes et leurs proches pendant ce combat contre l’épidémie de Covid-19. Beaucoup de femmes dans le secteur hospitalier et de la santé sont montées au créneau pour offrir leur service tout en mettant en péril leur vie bien qu’étant des épouses et des mères. La santéest au premier plan mais la sécurité dans toutes ses formes pour les victimes d’agression et d’abus va de pair. Nous nous inclinons devant toutes les victimes décédées mais nous nous levons pour dire « NON » à la violence envers les femmes!! *Cet article a été initialement publié dans L'Express, Mauritius. Vidya Charan est le Directrice Exécutive, Mauritius Family Planning & Welfare Association (MFPWA). La MFPWA bénéficie du soutien de l’Union européenne pour un projet de promotion de la santé maternelle saine pendant une période de quatre ans (2019-2022). Le projet fournit les services de la santé sexuelle et reproductive, en augmentant l’accès de la contraception et le conseil, le planning familial, pour les personnes les plus vulnérables. Le projet travaille également à la réhabilitation des enfants victimes d’abus sexuels, l’autonomisation des jeunes à travers l’éducation sexuelle et le screening des personnes pour les cancers des organes reproductifs. Le projet inclut également une importante composante de lutte contre la violence domestique.