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IPPF/Tommy Trenchard

Resources

Latest resources from across the federation and our partners

Spotlight

A selection of resources from across the Federation

ippf team with Cape Verde Prime Minister
Resource

IPPF first high level visit to Cape Verde: Video report

24 June 2022

From 25 - 29 May 2022, IPPF Board of Trustees Chair, Kate Gilmore, and IPPF Regional Director for Africa, Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry, made an official visit to Cape Verde to support the work of VERDEFAM, the Cape Verde Association for the Protection of the Family and IPPF's Member Association in the country.  The visit was aimed at strengthening IPPF’s work through VERDEFAM, the Cape Verdian Government, and other International Organizations in the country.

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Reproductive Health Uganda
Resource

| 17 November 2016

Reproductive Health Uganda: reaching the most remote areas

Every Thursday a team from RHU Gulu district provides a mobile outreach clinic in Atega village in the Omoro district in Northern Uganda. The outreach team goes out into this poor remote area which would otherwise not have access to sexual and reproductive health services.  The outreach clinic provides a range of services including diagnosis, testing and treatment, family planning such as fitting implants, providing condoms and HPV vaccines. Laboratory technician, Denis Bongonyinge carries out testing for malaria, Hepatitis B, HIV/AIDS, pneumonia and other infections. Other members of the team provide immunisations and vaccinations.  Provision of integrated services in such remote areas is vital for the local community; many men, women and children would not be able to receive the types of treatment and care that RHU works diligently to provide. 

Reproductive Health Uganda
Resource

| 17 November 2016

Reproductive Health Uganda: reaching the most remote areas

Every Thursday a team from RHU Gulu district provides a mobile outreach clinic in Atega village in the Omoro district in Northern Uganda. The outreach team goes out into this poor remote area which would otherwise not have access to sexual and reproductive health services.  The outreach clinic provides a range of services including diagnosis, testing and treatment, family planning such as fitting implants, providing condoms and HPV vaccines. Laboratory technician, Denis Bongonyinge carries out testing for malaria, Hepatitis B, HIV/AIDS, pneumonia and other infections. Other members of the team provide immunisations and vaccinations.  Provision of integrated services in such remote areas is vital for the local community; many men, women and children would not be able to receive the types of treatment and care that RHU works diligently to provide. 

Reproductive Health Uganda
Resource

| 13 October 2016

Keeping Young Ugandans Healthy

The Access, Services and Knowledge (ASK): what young people want, what young people need’ programme targets young people (10-24 years) including underserved groups, with a specific focus on uptake of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services in the countries of Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, Ghana and Senegal. ASK aims to ensure that young people not only receive direct information on sexual and reproductive health and rights so that they can make independent informed decisions. The ASK programme is a joint effort by 7 organisations: IPPF Rutgers WPF, Simavi, Amref Flying Doctors, Choice, dance4life and Stop Aids Now! Child Helpline International is engaged in the programme as a technical partner.

Reproductive Health Uganda
Resource

| 13 October 2016

Keeping Young Ugandans Healthy

The Access, Services and Knowledge (ASK): what young people want, what young people need’ programme targets young people (10-24 years) including underserved groups, with a specific focus on uptake of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services in the countries of Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, Ghana and Senegal. ASK aims to ensure that young people not only receive direct information on sexual and reproductive health and rights so that they can make independent informed decisions. The ASK programme is a joint effort by 7 organisations: IPPF Rutgers WPF, Simavi, Amref Flying Doctors, Choice, dance4life and Stop Aids Now! Child Helpline International is engaged in the programme as a technical partner.

Monitoring officer with app
Resource

| 13 October 2016

Ensuring people can get the contraception they want

"We capture the data directly into this app. It maps out what the demand will be and ensures that we never run out of those supplies." Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria (PPFN)'s Monitoring and Evaluation Officer, Babatunde, is responsible for ensuring the supply of contraceptives for all the cluster facilities. "My job entails the use of a mobile app built for direct data information capture (DDIC). I created an account for each of the 10 facilities that were under the Clusterplus Model. ClusterPLUS is something of a hybrid. It was built on the foundation of PPFN’s previous work but added new thinking, including ideas developed by IPPF member associations in Kenya and Uganda, who helped PPFN adapt them for Nigeria. At its heart is a simple concept - partnership. The closer you can get to local communities, the better you work with national and local government and more you try to build local ownership, the better. "Before I stock up their store, I audit their supplies and can review their monthly report via the app. I put this into the mobile app as well as the commodities I have supplied them. Every two months, the app forecasts what a particular facility will need based on the contraceptive demand,” says Babatunde. "I provided training on the mobile app for the store keepers at the facilities we worked with. All through the nine months of the Clusterplus Project, no facility ever ran out. This meant family planning methods were always available to those that needed them.” Babatunde has developed a wealth of knowledge about family planning and the many methods available. Clients favoured long-acting methods Implanol and the IUCD.

Monitoring officer with app
Resource

| 13 October 2016

Ensuring people can get the contraception they want

"We capture the data directly into this app. It maps out what the demand will be and ensures that we never run out of those supplies." Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria (PPFN)'s Monitoring and Evaluation Officer, Babatunde, is responsible for ensuring the supply of contraceptives for all the cluster facilities. "My job entails the use of a mobile app built for direct data information capture (DDIC). I created an account for each of the 10 facilities that were under the Clusterplus Model. ClusterPLUS is something of a hybrid. It was built on the foundation of PPFN’s previous work but added new thinking, including ideas developed by IPPF member associations in Kenya and Uganda, who helped PPFN adapt them for Nigeria. At its heart is a simple concept - partnership. The closer you can get to local communities, the better you work with national and local government and more you try to build local ownership, the better. "Before I stock up their store, I audit their supplies and can review their monthly report via the app. I put this into the mobile app as well as the commodities I have supplied them. Every two months, the app forecasts what a particular facility will need based on the contraceptive demand,” says Babatunde. "I provided training on the mobile app for the store keepers at the facilities we worked with. All through the nine months of the Clusterplus Project, no facility ever ran out. This meant family planning methods were always available to those that needed them.” Babatunde has developed a wealth of knowledge about family planning and the many methods available. Clients favoured long-acting methods Implanol and the IUCD.

Planned Parenthood Association of Ghana
Resource

| 05 October 2016

A Bright Future: Lanterns for Women's Empowerment

Women’s empowerment is key to ensuring their health and well-being. A partnership between public, private and civil society found a unique way to address health and gender inequalities in one of the most disadvantageous communities in the Northern regions of Ghana. This pilot project introduced solar lanterns, health and economic interventions to 20 villages. The project was effective because it brought together Japan’s ODA, private sector technology and IPPF’s community-based activities to challenge structural barriers and harmful gender norms. In doing so, we have done more than bring ‘light’ where there was once ‘darkness’. This intervention has transformed the lives of women, their families and their community.

Planned Parenthood Association of Ghana
Resource

| 05 October 2016

A Bright Future: Lanterns for Women's Empowerment

Women’s empowerment is key to ensuring their health and well-being. A partnership between public, private and civil society found a unique way to address health and gender inequalities in one of the most disadvantageous communities in the Northern regions of Ghana. This pilot project introduced solar lanterns, health and economic interventions to 20 villages. The project was effective because it brought together Japan’s ODA, private sector technology and IPPF’s community-based activities to challenge structural barriers and harmful gender norms. In doing so, we have done more than bring ‘light’ where there was once ‘darkness’. This intervention has transformed the lives of women, their families and their community.

Financial Statement 2015 cover
Resource

| 17 June 2016

Financial Statement 2015

IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$126.2 million to US$116.2 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$5.8 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$6.2 million and reduced donations in kind of US$0.6 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$4m with the balance of US$0.9 million decrease in other income and trading activities. The total decrease is split between restricted and unrestricted funds by US$2.3 million and US$7.6 million respectively. With the exception of Norway and Japan, all government (more significantly Australia and Sweden) donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 14% on a like for like basis compared to 2014. Total expenditure has decreased from US$137.5 million to US$131.8 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$84.2 million to US$85.6 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$53.3 million to US$46.2 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$1.9 million) and the use of US$8.9m designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$2.3m); support for resource mobilization at regional and central level (US$1.5 million); campaign and advocacy for UN Liaison office (US$0.9 million); scale up fund for SGBV support to MAs (US$0.5 million); contingency spend on various activities (US$0.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-by-year basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted net operating expenditure of US$13.4 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$2.1 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$15.6 million. After taking into account actuarial gain on the defined benefit pension scheme and investment losses the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$13.6 million. The level of unrestricted income received was approximately US$4 million less than forecast primarily due to the strength of the US dollar versus donor currencies and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$2m million). This resulted in a decrease in general reserves to US$21.9 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$73.3 million.

Financial Statement 2015 cover
Resource

| 17 June 2016

Financial Statement 2015

IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$126.2 million to US$116.2 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$5.8 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$6.2 million and reduced donations in kind of US$0.6 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$4m with the balance of US$0.9 million decrease in other income and trading activities. The total decrease is split between restricted and unrestricted funds by US$2.3 million and US$7.6 million respectively. With the exception of Norway and Japan, all government (more significantly Australia and Sweden) donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 14% on a like for like basis compared to 2014. Total expenditure has decreased from US$137.5 million to US$131.8 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$84.2 million to US$85.6 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$53.3 million to US$46.2 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$1.9 million) and the use of US$8.9m designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$2.3m); support for resource mobilization at regional and central level (US$1.5 million); campaign and advocacy for UN Liaison office (US$0.9 million); scale up fund for SGBV support to MAs (US$0.5 million); contingency spend on various activities (US$0.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-by-year basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted net operating expenditure of US$13.4 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$2.1 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$15.6 million. After taking into account actuarial gain on the defined benefit pension scheme and investment losses the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$13.6 million. The level of unrestricted income received was approximately US$4 million less than forecast primarily due to the strength of the US dollar versus donor currencies and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$2m million). This resulted in a decrease in general reserves to US$21.9 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$73.3 million.

Reproductive Health Uganda
Resource

| 17 November 2016

Reproductive Health Uganda: reaching the most remote areas

Every Thursday a team from RHU Gulu district provides a mobile outreach clinic in Atega village in the Omoro district in Northern Uganda. The outreach team goes out into this poor remote area which would otherwise not have access to sexual and reproductive health services.  The outreach clinic provides a range of services including diagnosis, testing and treatment, family planning such as fitting implants, providing condoms and HPV vaccines. Laboratory technician, Denis Bongonyinge carries out testing for malaria, Hepatitis B, HIV/AIDS, pneumonia and other infections. Other members of the team provide immunisations and vaccinations.  Provision of integrated services in such remote areas is vital for the local community; many men, women and children would not be able to receive the types of treatment and care that RHU works diligently to provide. 

Reproductive Health Uganda
Resource

| 17 November 2016

Reproductive Health Uganda: reaching the most remote areas

Every Thursday a team from RHU Gulu district provides a mobile outreach clinic in Atega village in the Omoro district in Northern Uganda. The outreach team goes out into this poor remote area which would otherwise not have access to sexual and reproductive health services.  The outreach clinic provides a range of services including diagnosis, testing and treatment, family planning such as fitting implants, providing condoms and HPV vaccines. Laboratory technician, Denis Bongonyinge carries out testing for malaria, Hepatitis B, HIV/AIDS, pneumonia and other infections. Other members of the team provide immunisations and vaccinations.  Provision of integrated services in such remote areas is vital for the local community; many men, women and children would not be able to receive the types of treatment and care that RHU works diligently to provide. 

Reproductive Health Uganda
Resource

| 13 October 2016

Keeping Young Ugandans Healthy

The Access, Services and Knowledge (ASK): what young people want, what young people need’ programme targets young people (10-24 years) including underserved groups, with a specific focus on uptake of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services in the countries of Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, Ghana and Senegal. ASK aims to ensure that young people not only receive direct information on sexual and reproductive health and rights so that they can make independent informed decisions. The ASK programme is a joint effort by 7 organisations: IPPF Rutgers WPF, Simavi, Amref Flying Doctors, Choice, dance4life and Stop Aids Now! Child Helpline International is engaged in the programme as a technical partner.

Reproductive Health Uganda
Resource

| 13 October 2016

Keeping Young Ugandans Healthy

The Access, Services and Knowledge (ASK): what young people want, what young people need’ programme targets young people (10-24 years) including underserved groups, with a specific focus on uptake of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services in the countries of Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, Ghana and Senegal. ASK aims to ensure that young people not only receive direct information on sexual and reproductive health and rights so that they can make independent informed decisions. The ASK programme is a joint effort by 7 organisations: IPPF Rutgers WPF, Simavi, Amref Flying Doctors, Choice, dance4life and Stop Aids Now! Child Helpline International is engaged in the programme as a technical partner.

Monitoring officer with app
Resource

| 13 October 2016

Ensuring people can get the contraception they want

"We capture the data directly into this app. It maps out what the demand will be and ensures that we never run out of those supplies." Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria (PPFN)'s Monitoring and Evaluation Officer, Babatunde, is responsible for ensuring the supply of contraceptives for all the cluster facilities. "My job entails the use of a mobile app built for direct data information capture (DDIC). I created an account for each of the 10 facilities that were under the Clusterplus Model. ClusterPLUS is something of a hybrid. It was built on the foundation of PPFN’s previous work but added new thinking, including ideas developed by IPPF member associations in Kenya and Uganda, who helped PPFN adapt them for Nigeria. At its heart is a simple concept - partnership. The closer you can get to local communities, the better you work with national and local government and more you try to build local ownership, the better. "Before I stock up their store, I audit their supplies and can review their monthly report via the app. I put this into the mobile app as well as the commodities I have supplied them. Every two months, the app forecasts what a particular facility will need based on the contraceptive demand,” says Babatunde. "I provided training on the mobile app for the store keepers at the facilities we worked with. All through the nine months of the Clusterplus Project, no facility ever ran out. This meant family planning methods were always available to those that needed them.” Babatunde has developed a wealth of knowledge about family planning and the many methods available. Clients favoured long-acting methods Implanol and the IUCD.

Monitoring officer with app
Resource

| 13 October 2016

Ensuring people can get the contraception they want

"We capture the data directly into this app. It maps out what the demand will be and ensures that we never run out of those supplies." Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria (PPFN)'s Monitoring and Evaluation Officer, Babatunde, is responsible for ensuring the supply of contraceptives for all the cluster facilities. "My job entails the use of a mobile app built for direct data information capture (DDIC). I created an account for each of the 10 facilities that were under the Clusterplus Model. ClusterPLUS is something of a hybrid. It was built on the foundation of PPFN’s previous work but added new thinking, including ideas developed by IPPF member associations in Kenya and Uganda, who helped PPFN adapt them for Nigeria. At its heart is a simple concept - partnership. The closer you can get to local communities, the better you work with national and local government and more you try to build local ownership, the better. "Before I stock up their store, I audit their supplies and can review their monthly report via the app. I put this into the mobile app as well as the commodities I have supplied them. Every two months, the app forecasts what a particular facility will need based on the contraceptive demand,” says Babatunde. "I provided training on the mobile app for the store keepers at the facilities we worked with. All through the nine months of the Clusterplus Project, no facility ever ran out. This meant family planning methods were always available to those that needed them.” Babatunde has developed a wealth of knowledge about family planning and the many methods available. Clients favoured long-acting methods Implanol and the IUCD.

Planned Parenthood Association of Ghana
Resource

| 05 October 2016

A Bright Future: Lanterns for Women's Empowerment

Women’s empowerment is key to ensuring their health and well-being. A partnership between public, private and civil society found a unique way to address health and gender inequalities in one of the most disadvantageous communities in the Northern regions of Ghana. This pilot project introduced solar lanterns, health and economic interventions to 20 villages. The project was effective because it brought together Japan’s ODA, private sector technology and IPPF’s community-based activities to challenge structural barriers and harmful gender norms. In doing so, we have done more than bring ‘light’ where there was once ‘darkness’. This intervention has transformed the lives of women, their families and their community.

Planned Parenthood Association of Ghana
Resource

| 05 October 2016

A Bright Future: Lanterns for Women's Empowerment

Women’s empowerment is key to ensuring their health and well-being. A partnership between public, private and civil society found a unique way to address health and gender inequalities in one of the most disadvantageous communities in the Northern regions of Ghana. This pilot project introduced solar lanterns, health and economic interventions to 20 villages. The project was effective because it brought together Japan’s ODA, private sector technology and IPPF’s community-based activities to challenge structural barriers and harmful gender norms. In doing so, we have done more than bring ‘light’ where there was once ‘darkness’. This intervention has transformed the lives of women, their families and their community.

Financial Statement 2015 cover
Resource

| 17 June 2016

Financial Statement 2015

IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$126.2 million to US$116.2 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$5.8 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$6.2 million and reduced donations in kind of US$0.6 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$4m with the balance of US$0.9 million decrease in other income and trading activities. The total decrease is split between restricted and unrestricted funds by US$2.3 million and US$7.6 million respectively. With the exception of Norway and Japan, all government (more significantly Australia and Sweden) donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 14% on a like for like basis compared to 2014. Total expenditure has decreased from US$137.5 million to US$131.8 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$84.2 million to US$85.6 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$53.3 million to US$46.2 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$1.9 million) and the use of US$8.9m designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$2.3m); support for resource mobilization at regional and central level (US$1.5 million); campaign and advocacy for UN Liaison office (US$0.9 million); scale up fund for SGBV support to MAs (US$0.5 million); contingency spend on various activities (US$0.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-by-year basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted net operating expenditure of US$13.4 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$2.1 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$15.6 million. After taking into account actuarial gain on the defined benefit pension scheme and investment losses the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$13.6 million. The level of unrestricted income received was approximately US$4 million less than forecast primarily due to the strength of the US dollar versus donor currencies and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$2m million). This resulted in a decrease in general reserves to US$21.9 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$73.3 million.

Financial Statement 2015 cover
Resource

| 17 June 2016

Financial Statement 2015

IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$126.2 million to US$116.2 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$5.8 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$6.2 million and reduced donations in kind of US$0.6 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$4m with the balance of US$0.9 million decrease in other income and trading activities. The total decrease is split between restricted and unrestricted funds by US$2.3 million and US$7.6 million respectively. With the exception of Norway and Japan, all government (more significantly Australia and Sweden) donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 14% on a like for like basis compared to 2014. Total expenditure has decreased from US$137.5 million to US$131.8 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$84.2 million to US$85.6 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$53.3 million to US$46.2 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$1.9 million) and the use of US$8.9m designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$2.3m); support for resource mobilization at regional and central level (US$1.5 million); campaign and advocacy for UN Liaison office (US$0.9 million); scale up fund for SGBV support to MAs (US$0.5 million); contingency spend on various activities (US$0.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-by-year basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted net operating expenditure of US$13.4 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$2.1 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$15.6 million. After taking into account actuarial gain on the defined benefit pension scheme and investment losses the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$13.6 million. The level of unrestricted income received was approximately US$4 million less than forecast primarily due to the strength of the US dollar versus donor currencies and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$2m million). This resulted in a decrease in general reserves to US$21.9 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$73.3 million.