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Nigeria

Articles by Nigeria

Photo of ACT!2030 young activists
07 February 2017

ACT!2030

IPPF collaborates with UNAIDS and The PACT to implement ACT!2030 (formerly ACT!2015), a youth-led social action initiative which engages young people in 12 countries with advocacy and accountability around the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and other SRHR agreements/frameworks. ACT!2030 was initiated in 2013 as a way to increase youth participation in the negotiations leading up to the adoption of the post-2015 development agenda, and for two years focused on establishing alliances of youth-led and youth-serving organisations in 12 countries across the world. The project is currently in Phase 4, which runs until the end of 2017, and aims to establish youth-led, data-driven accountability mechanisms to ensure youth engagement with the implementation of the SDGs and build an evidence base for advocacy. Ultimately, Phase 4 of ACT!2030 seeks to identify, assess and address key policy barriers to young people’s sexual and reproductive data by using existing data, supplemented by youth-collected data, to advocate and lobby for policy change. This phase involves four main activities: indicator advocacy (persuading decision makers to adopt youth-friendly SRHR and HIV indicators, including on things like comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) and access to youth-friendly services, into national/global reporting mechanisms); evidence gathering (creating national databases on quality of and access to youth-friendly services and CSE); communications (transforming this data and evidence into communications pieces that can be used to advocacy and lobby at national and international level); and global exchange (facilitating global visibility to share advocacy and engagement learnings and increase youth-led accountability in global and regional processes). ACT!2030 is implemented by national alliances of youth organisations in 12 countries: Algeria, Bulgaria, India, Jamaica, Kenya, Mexico, Nigeria, Philippines, South Africa, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe.  

Nigeria_IPPF_George Osodi
04 February 2022

Closing the Cervical Cancer Care Gap in Nigeria

World Cancer Day takes place every year on 4 February and is dedicated to raising the awareness of cancer and to encourage its prevention, detection and treatment. This year’s theme is “Close the care gap”. The campaign raises awareness about the lack of equity in cancer care and highlights barriers that exist for many people in accessing services and receiving the care they need. In this article, we highlight the work of IPPF’s Member Association in Nigeria, Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria (PPFN), in closing the care gap in the country. While going about her business at the marketplace, Mrs. Olufemi came across information about cervical cancer screening services offered at the Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria (PPFN) clinic in Lagos. Curious, and wanting to take advantage of this opportunity, she decided to visit the clinic. Before doing so, she requested her friend Mrs. Emeka to accompany her, just in case the results were not good, and she would need a shoulder to lean on. At the PPFN clinic, Mrs. Olufemi underwent screening for cervical cancer, and could not hide her joy when her results came back bearing good news. She was tested using the Visual Inspection of the Cervix with Acetic Acid (VIA) method, which is an inexpensive, simple test that is sensitive to detecting precancerous lesions, while providing instant results. Motivated by her friend’s actions and the good results, Mrs. Emeka decided to get tested as well. Her results, however, revealed the presence of pre-cancerous lesions in her cervix. She was devastated. Early cancer detection saves lives Dr. Abubakar Okai Aku, a PPFN healthcare service provider reassured a distraught Mrs. Emeka by informing her that early detection and diagnosis of cervical cancer may offer favourable prognosis and improve survival. However, she was too overwhelmed with emotion to pay attention. Thankfully, her friend Mrs. Olufemi helped calm her down, wiping the tears off her cheeks, and comforting her. Since her diagnosis was in the pre-cancerous stage, Dr. Abubakar referred Mrs. Emeka for cryotherapy treatment, also available at the PPFN Lagos clinic. According to Dr. Abubakar, cryotherapy is a minimally invasive treatment method that involves the freezing of the abnormal cells in the cervix, creating way for healthy cells to grow back. This approach, used by IPPF’s Member Associations that offer cervical cancer services is aligned with national protocols and makes use of existing local infrastructure. Dr. Abubakar adds that the intervention is replicable and scalable nationwide. Successful treatment Mrs. Emeka immediately took up the cryotherapy treatment as advised by Dr. Abubakar. Three months later, she returned for a scheduled follow up visit at the clinic and all was found to be well. She had successfully responded to treatment. Despite having precancerous lesions, Ms. Emeka did not develop cervical cancer because of early detection. She always thanks her friend Mrs. Olufemi for her role in helping her realize her risk for developing cervical cancer. Today, Ms. Emeka is an advocate of cervical cancer screening in her community and uses all available opportunities to talk to women about the need for - and importance of - cervical cancer screening and respective treatment. PPFN’s cervical cancer intervention programs  Between 2012–2017, PPFN was part of the Cervical Cancer Screening and Preventative Therapy (CCSPT) initiative, which was aimed at improving reproductive health outcomes for women. The project significantly contributed to reducing the growing cervical cancer burden in Nigeria. By July 2017, a total of 1,145,525 women had been screened for cervical cancer, with 1,458 positive cases, of which 1,321 of them receiving cryotherapy treatment through PPFN healthcare service providers.  When the CCSPT project ended, cervical cancer services were integrated into regular PPFN services. In 2021, over 1 million women were screened for cervical cancer by IPPFAR’s member association in Nigeria. In 2014, the Federal Ministry of Health set up a cervical cancer screening technical working group for cancer prevention to scale up cervical cancer screening in the country, of which PPFN is a member. PPFN works closely with various partners, among them the National Cancer Control Program of the Federal Ministry of Health to achieve its goals. PPFN is committed to addressing the cancer burden in Nigeria, including the use of digital and other technology to increase people’s access to reproductive health services, and closing the equity gap in cancer care in the country. Story by Dr. Abubakar Okai Aku and Maryanne W. Waweru. Also read: Accessing Cervical Cancer Services and Healthcare in Nigeria For more updates on our work, follow IPPF Africa Region - Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

Nigeria_IPPF_George Osodi
04 February 2022

Accessing Cervical Cancer Services and Healthcare in Nigeria

By Maryanne W. Waweru Cervical cancer, a type of cancer that occurs in the cells of the cervix, is ranked as the fourth most common cancer among women globally, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). About 90% of the new cases and deaths worldwide in 2020 occurred in low and middle-income countries. Countries in sub-Saharan Africa experience a disproportionate burden of the disease, where 19 of the top 20 countries with the highest cervical cancer burden were in sub-Saharan Africa in 2018. In the West African country of Nigeria, over 12,000 new cervical cancer cases are diagnosed annually (estimations for 2020) and it is the second most common female cancer in women aged 15 - 44 years in the country. IPPF’s Member Association in Nigeria, the Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria (PPFN) is involved in various efforts aimed at increasing access to cervical screening and treatment in the country. PPFN’s efforts are geared towards closing the gap in cancer care in the country, complementing Government and other stakeholders’ efforts to increase access to life-saving preventive services, diagnosis, treatment and care. Recipients of PPFN’s cervical cancer services include women living with HIV, who are six times more likely to develop cervical cancer compared to women without HIV. PPFN uses the Visual Inspection of the Cervix with Acetic Acid (VIA) screening and cryotherapy treatment approaches across its 45 clinics spread over 36 states in Nigeria. It also offers these services in over 100 associate health facilities across the country. Eliminating the cost barrier Dr. Abubakar Okai Aku, a PPFN healthcare service provider says cancer services at all PPFN and associate health facilities are offered at an affordable, subsidized cost which enables more women to access the services. High medical fees are a significant barrier to people’s access to healthcare. Additionally, PPFN conducts mobile outreach clinics offering a wide range of sexual reproductive health services, including cancer services, to vulnerable communities in hard-to-reach, poor and marginalized areas. These areas, mostly in the countryside, have no proper road infrastructure and have few and poorly equipped health facilities. In some areas, insecurity challenges hinder access to health services. “PPFN accesses these areas by working with local Governmental authorities, the primary healthcare system and local community structures that include community health volunteers, chiefs, religious leaders and other gatekeepers to enhance our outreach work,” says Dr. Abubakar. He notes that since many women in these areas cannot afford the services, PPFN offers the services for free. Referrals are also made to PPFN’s nearest static clinics, as well as Government health facilities - with whom the organization collaborates closely.   Husband’s permission to access health services PPFN’s work in the community is however not without challenges. According to Dr. Abubakar, they must contend with cultural factors that hinder women’s access to reproductive health services. For example, some men do not allow their female partners or household members to go to the clinic without their permission and when they allow them to, they would only allow it under certain conditions. “The husbands tell the service providers to first come to their house and explain the services they wish to offer to their wife or wives. Sometimes they grant permission, other times they don’t. Many women in rural communities are often not in full control  of their own health. Since many don’t work, they not only have to ask their husbands for permission to go to the clinic or attend mobile outreaches, but they also need money for transport and for treatment. To this end, PPFN works with male champions in the community, sensitizing them on the need to empower women and enabling them to take charge of their own health,” says Dr. Abubakar. Dr. Abubakar also notes that misinformation, stigma and ostracization around women’s cancers also prevents many women from seeking cancer screening, treatment and care services. “We have seen women present with cancers at an advanced stage, leading to negative health outcomes. PPFN diligently works with local community structures to dispel myths and rumors about cancer, educating them and encouraging them to seek prevention and treatment services,” he says. PPFN is committed to addressing gaps with regard to cervical cancer prevention, treatment and care services in the country. Learn more: Closing the Cervical Cancer Care Gap in Nigeria. Maryanne W. Waweru is the Communications Officer, IPPF Africa Regional Office. For more updates on our work, follow IPPF Africa Region on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

Dr Aproko
13 January 2022

Creative session between Dr Aproko and the Youth Action Movement of Nigeria on SRHR

In order to increase African youth awareness on specific issues related to sexual and reproductive health and rights, IPPFAR engaged the services of Influencer Aproko Dr. for a 1-month digital campaign including the production and dissemination of various video content. This video highlights the creative session between Dr Aproko and the Youth Action Movement of Nigeria on sexual reproductive health and education. The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organization in Africa, and the leading sexual and reproductive health and rights advocacy voice in the region. Headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, the overarching goal of IPPFAR is to increase access to SRHR services to the most vulnerable youth, men and women in sub-Saharan Africa.

Establishing Digital Health Interventions in Nigeria
17 June 2021

Adapting Family Planning Services in Times of Crisis: Establishing Digital Health Interventions in Nigeria

The COVID-19 pandemic caused great disruptions in the lives and livelihoods of millions of people across the world. Among the most affected sectors was that of health, where the pandemic led to an overwhelming stretch in service delivery. This necessitated an urgent shift in regular service delivery models. In Nigeria, as was the case in most countries, many people were unable to access health facilities owing to the mobility restrictive measures imposed by the government in attempts to control the spread of the disease. COVID-19 constraints saw healthcare organizations such as Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria (PPFN) - IPPF’s Member Association in the country - limit the hours and days clients could access services at its static clinics. Mobile health outreaches were no longer possible, and people were cautious about visiting hospitals. Additionally, health workers desired to attend to fewer clients for their own precautionary measures. This called for a review of the traditional face to face model that clinicians traditionally provided to clients, necessitating their adoption of digital and mobile technologies for health service delivery. COVID-19 accelerated the shift towards the digital world, with PPFN tapping into this opportunity. Harnessing the power of digital and mobile technologies, PPFN implemented new Digital Health Interventions (DHIs) to ensure sustained provision of sexual reproductive health (SRH) information and services during the pandemic. Download the complete case study here: Establishing Digital Health Interventions in Nigeria

Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria

As the statistics show, Nigeria faces considerable sexual and reproductive health (SRH) challenges. Established over 25 years ago, the Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria (PPFN) is one of the country’s most experienced SRH organizations and nationally, it delivers around 10% of all family planning services. Its work extends to voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) in HIV and AIDS, antenatal and post-natal care, post-abortion care, infertility diagnosis and counselling, and education and counselling on sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV and AIDS.

PPFN’s network of service delivery points is substantial: it has over 2,300 distinct service points. This includes 68 permanent clinics, 1,558 associated clinics and 27 community-based services (CBSs). The team consists of 110 permanent staff, over 750 volunteers and a Youth Action Movement membership of 350. Working together, they deliver a phenomenal number of sexual health services.

PPFN partners closely with the Nigerian government to deliver services and providing technical guidance on policy development and implementation. It works in collaboration with other non-governmental organizations (NGO) and with private sector companies including The Central Bank of Nigeria, the National Agency for the Control of AIDS, Allied Products Plc and Nigeria Breweries. PPFN receives financial support from the UNDP, the Global HIV/AIDS Initiative, Pathfinder Nigeria, and IPPF’s Japan Trust Fund.

 

Photo of ACT!2030 young activists
07 February 2017

ACT!2030

IPPF collaborates with UNAIDS and The PACT to implement ACT!2030 (formerly ACT!2015), a youth-led social action initiative which engages young people in 12 countries with advocacy and accountability around the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and other SRHR agreements/frameworks. ACT!2030 was initiated in 2013 as a way to increase youth participation in the negotiations leading up to the adoption of the post-2015 development agenda, and for two years focused on establishing alliances of youth-led and youth-serving organisations in 12 countries across the world. The project is currently in Phase 4, which runs until the end of 2017, and aims to establish youth-led, data-driven accountability mechanisms to ensure youth engagement with the implementation of the SDGs and build an evidence base for advocacy. Ultimately, Phase 4 of ACT!2030 seeks to identify, assess and address key policy barriers to young people’s sexual and reproductive data by using existing data, supplemented by youth-collected data, to advocate and lobby for policy change. This phase involves four main activities: indicator advocacy (persuading decision makers to adopt youth-friendly SRHR and HIV indicators, including on things like comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) and access to youth-friendly services, into national/global reporting mechanisms); evidence gathering (creating national databases on quality of and access to youth-friendly services and CSE); communications (transforming this data and evidence into communications pieces that can be used to advocacy and lobby at national and international level); and global exchange (facilitating global visibility to share advocacy and engagement learnings and increase youth-led accountability in global and regional processes). ACT!2030 is implemented by national alliances of youth organisations in 12 countries: Algeria, Bulgaria, India, Jamaica, Kenya, Mexico, Nigeria, Philippines, South Africa, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe.  

Nigeria_IPPF_George Osodi
04 February 2022

Closing the Cervical Cancer Care Gap in Nigeria

World Cancer Day takes place every year on 4 February and is dedicated to raising the awareness of cancer and to encourage its prevention, detection and treatment. This year’s theme is “Close the care gap”. The campaign raises awareness about the lack of equity in cancer care and highlights barriers that exist for many people in accessing services and receiving the care they need. In this article, we highlight the work of IPPF’s Member Association in Nigeria, Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria (PPFN), in closing the care gap in the country. While going about her business at the marketplace, Mrs. Olufemi came across information about cervical cancer screening services offered at the Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria (PPFN) clinic in Lagos. Curious, and wanting to take advantage of this opportunity, she decided to visit the clinic. Before doing so, she requested her friend Mrs. Emeka to accompany her, just in case the results were not good, and she would need a shoulder to lean on. At the PPFN clinic, Mrs. Olufemi underwent screening for cervical cancer, and could not hide her joy when her results came back bearing good news. She was tested using the Visual Inspection of the Cervix with Acetic Acid (VIA) method, which is an inexpensive, simple test that is sensitive to detecting precancerous lesions, while providing instant results. Motivated by her friend’s actions and the good results, Mrs. Emeka decided to get tested as well. Her results, however, revealed the presence of pre-cancerous lesions in her cervix. She was devastated. Early cancer detection saves lives Dr. Abubakar Okai Aku, a PPFN healthcare service provider reassured a distraught Mrs. Emeka by informing her that early detection and diagnosis of cervical cancer may offer favourable prognosis and improve survival. However, she was too overwhelmed with emotion to pay attention. Thankfully, her friend Mrs. Olufemi helped calm her down, wiping the tears off her cheeks, and comforting her. Since her diagnosis was in the pre-cancerous stage, Dr. Abubakar referred Mrs. Emeka for cryotherapy treatment, also available at the PPFN Lagos clinic. According to Dr. Abubakar, cryotherapy is a minimally invasive treatment method that involves the freezing of the abnormal cells in the cervix, creating way for healthy cells to grow back. This approach, used by IPPF’s Member Associations that offer cervical cancer services is aligned with national protocols and makes use of existing local infrastructure. Dr. Abubakar adds that the intervention is replicable and scalable nationwide. Successful treatment Mrs. Emeka immediately took up the cryotherapy treatment as advised by Dr. Abubakar. Three months later, she returned for a scheduled follow up visit at the clinic and all was found to be well. She had successfully responded to treatment. Despite having precancerous lesions, Ms. Emeka did not develop cervical cancer because of early detection. She always thanks her friend Mrs. Olufemi for her role in helping her realize her risk for developing cervical cancer. Today, Ms. Emeka is an advocate of cervical cancer screening in her community and uses all available opportunities to talk to women about the need for - and importance of - cervical cancer screening and respective treatment. PPFN’s cervical cancer intervention programs  Between 2012–2017, PPFN was part of the Cervical Cancer Screening and Preventative Therapy (CCSPT) initiative, which was aimed at improving reproductive health outcomes for women. The project significantly contributed to reducing the growing cervical cancer burden in Nigeria. By July 2017, a total of 1,145,525 women had been screened for cervical cancer, with 1,458 positive cases, of which 1,321 of them receiving cryotherapy treatment through PPFN healthcare service providers.  When the CCSPT project ended, cervical cancer services were integrated into regular PPFN services. In 2021, over 1 million women were screened for cervical cancer by IPPFAR’s member association in Nigeria. In 2014, the Federal Ministry of Health set up a cervical cancer screening technical working group for cancer prevention to scale up cervical cancer screening in the country, of which PPFN is a member. PPFN works closely with various partners, among them the National Cancer Control Program of the Federal Ministry of Health to achieve its goals. PPFN is committed to addressing the cancer burden in Nigeria, including the use of digital and other technology to increase people’s access to reproductive health services, and closing the equity gap in cancer care in the country. Story by Dr. Abubakar Okai Aku and Maryanne W. Waweru. Also read: Accessing Cervical Cancer Services and Healthcare in Nigeria For more updates on our work, follow IPPF Africa Region - Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

Nigeria_IPPF_George Osodi
04 February 2022

Accessing Cervical Cancer Services and Healthcare in Nigeria

By Maryanne W. Waweru Cervical cancer, a type of cancer that occurs in the cells of the cervix, is ranked as the fourth most common cancer among women globally, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). About 90% of the new cases and deaths worldwide in 2020 occurred in low and middle-income countries. Countries in sub-Saharan Africa experience a disproportionate burden of the disease, where 19 of the top 20 countries with the highest cervical cancer burden were in sub-Saharan Africa in 2018. In the West African country of Nigeria, over 12,000 new cervical cancer cases are diagnosed annually (estimations for 2020) and it is the second most common female cancer in women aged 15 - 44 years in the country. IPPF’s Member Association in Nigeria, the Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria (PPFN) is involved in various efforts aimed at increasing access to cervical screening and treatment in the country. PPFN’s efforts are geared towards closing the gap in cancer care in the country, complementing Government and other stakeholders’ efforts to increase access to life-saving preventive services, diagnosis, treatment and care. Recipients of PPFN’s cervical cancer services include women living with HIV, who are six times more likely to develop cervical cancer compared to women without HIV. PPFN uses the Visual Inspection of the Cervix with Acetic Acid (VIA) screening and cryotherapy treatment approaches across its 45 clinics spread over 36 states in Nigeria. It also offers these services in over 100 associate health facilities across the country. Eliminating the cost barrier Dr. Abubakar Okai Aku, a PPFN healthcare service provider says cancer services at all PPFN and associate health facilities are offered at an affordable, subsidized cost which enables more women to access the services. High medical fees are a significant barrier to people’s access to healthcare. Additionally, PPFN conducts mobile outreach clinics offering a wide range of sexual reproductive health services, including cancer services, to vulnerable communities in hard-to-reach, poor and marginalized areas. These areas, mostly in the countryside, have no proper road infrastructure and have few and poorly equipped health facilities. In some areas, insecurity challenges hinder access to health services. “PPFN accesses these areas by working with local Governmental authorities, the primary healthcare system and local community structures that include community health volunteers, chiefs, religious leaders and other gatekeepers to enhance our outreach work,” says Dr. Abubakar. He notes that since many women in these areas cannot afford the services, PPFN offers the services for free. Referrals are also made to PPFN’s nearest static clinics, as well as Government health facilities - with whom the organization collaborates closely.   Husband’s permission to access health services PPFN’s work in the community is however not without challenges. According to Dr. Abubakar, they must contend with cultural factors that hinder women’s access to reproductive health services. For example, some men do not allow their female partners or household members to go to the clinic without their permission and when they allow them to, they would only allow it under certain conditions. “The husbands tell the service providers to first come to their house and explain the services they wish to offer to their wife or wives. Sometimes they grant permission, other times they don’t. Many women in rural communities are often not in full control  of their own health. Since many don’t work, they not only have to ask their husbands for permission to go to the clinic or attend mobile outreaches, but they also need money for transport and for treatment. To this end, PPFN works with male champions in the community, sensitizing them on the need to empower women and enabling them to take charge of their own health,” says Dr. Abubakar. Dr. Abubakar also notes that misinformation, stigma and ostracization around women’s cancers also prevents many women from seeking cancer screening, treatment and care services. “We have seen women present with cancers at an advanced stage, leading to negative health outcomes. PPFN diligently works with local community structures to dispel myths and rumors about cancer, educating them and encouraging them to seek prevention and treatment services,” he says. PPFN is committed to addressing gaps with regard to cervical cancer prevention, treatment and care services in the country. Learn more: Closing the Cervical Cancer Care Gap in Nigeria. Maryanne W. Waweru is the Communications Officer, IPPF Africa Regional Office. For more updates on our work, follow IPPF Africa Region on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

Dr Aproko
13 January 2022

Creative session between Dr Aproko and the Youth Action Movement of Nigeria on SRHR

In order to increase African youth awareness on specific issues related to sexual and reproductive health and rights, IPPFAR engaged the services of Influencer Aproko Dr. for a 1-month digital campaign including the production and dissemination of various video content. This video highlights the creative session between Dr Aproko and the Youth Action Movement of Nigeria on sexual reproductive health and education. The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organization in Africa, and the leading sexual and reproductive health and rights advocacy voice in the region. Headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, the overarching goal of IPPFAR is to increase access to SRHR services to the most vulnerable youth, men and women in sub-Saharan Africa.

Establishing Digital Health Interventions in Nigeria
17 June 2021

Adapting Family Planning Services in Times of Crisis: Establishing Digital Health Interventions in Nigeria

The COVID-19 pandemic caused great disruptions in the lives and livelihoods of millions of people across the world. Among the most affected sectors was that of health, where the pandemic led to an overwhelming stretch in service delivery. This necessitated an urgent shift in regular service delivery models. In Nigeria, as was the case in most countries, many people were unable to access health facilities owing to the mobility restrictive measures imposed by the government in attempts to control the spread of the disease. COVID-19 constraints saw healthcare organizations such as Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria (PPFN) - IPPF’s Member Association in the country - limit the hours and days clients could access services at its static clinics. Mobile health outreaches were no longer possible, and people were cautious about visiting hospitals. Additionally, health workers desired to attend to fewer clients for their own precautionary measures. This called for a review of the traditional face to face model that clinicians traditionally provided to clients, necessitating their adoption of digital and mobile technologies for health service delivery. COVID-19 accelerated the shift towards the digital world, with PPFN tapping into this opportunity. Harnessing the power of digital and mobile technologies, PPFN implemented new Digital Health Interventions (DHIs) to ensure sustained provision of sexual reproductive health (SRH) information and services during the pandemic. Download the complete case study here: Establishing Digital Health Interventions in Nigeria

Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria

As the statistics show, Nigeria faces considerable sexual and reproductive health (SRH) challenges. Established over 25 years ago, the Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria (PPFN) is one of the country’s most experienced SRH organizations and nationally, it delivers around 10% of all family planning services. Its work extends to voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) in HIV and AIDS, antenatal and post-natal care, post-abortion care, infertility diagnosis and counselling, and education and counselling on sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV and AIDS.

PPFN’s network of service delivery points is substantial: it has over 2,300 distinct service points. This includes 68 permanent clinics, 1,558 associated clinics and 27 community-based services (CBSs). The team consists of 110 permanent staff, over 750 volunteers and a Youth Action Movement membership of 350. Working together, they deliver a phenomenal number of sexual health services.

PPFN partners closely with the Nigerian government to deliver services and providing technical guidance on policy development and implementation. It works in collaboration with other non-governmental organizations (NGO) and with private sector companies including The Central Bank of Nigeria, the National Agency for the Control of AIDS, Allied Products Plc and Nigeria Breweries. PPFN receives financial support from the UNDP, the Global HIV/AIDS Initiative, Pathfinder Nigeria, and IPPF’s Japan Trust Fund.