- - -
Ethiopia youth
news item

| 13 January 2022

“Let’s talk about sex baby”: Responding to the Needs of Adolescent Girls and Young Women in Africa in the Digital Age

In todays’ digital world, everything is available online. Information, products, and services. 22% of the African population, can access the world at the click of a button and mobile penetration rate in Sub-Saharan Africa is at 44%. The African Union and the World Bank Group have committed to connecting every African individual, business, and government by 2030. 60% of Africa’s population is <25 years. The young Africans can be seen on the streets of Nairobi, Accra, and Johannesburg, swiping left and right, using this readily available digital technology for entertainment, education, and learning. Often, and unsurprisingly, this pursuit for knowledge is centered around sex. This phenomenon has though had a less impressive impact on African girls and young women, who continue to be trapped by taboos and restrictive gender and social norms, unable to access accurate sexual and reproductive health and rights information online. The Mobile Gender Gap means only two out of three women in Africa own a mobile phone, and only a third use mobile data regularly. Retrogressive cultural practices and patriarchal norms though are endemic including early marriage, female genital cutting, sexual cleansing, and wife inheritance, exposing them to innumerable risks. STIs, HIV, gender-based sexual violence and teenage pregnancies are commonplace; and complications from pregnancy and childbirth complications remain the leading cause of death among girls aged 15–19 years globally. Today, as we commemorate the International Day of the Girl Child centered on the ‘Digital Generation’ we want to call attention to the rights’ of the girl child and the unique challenges they face globally. IPPFs Youth Action Movement, a peer-led advocacy platform for young people aged 10-24 years, is showing us how the growing technological space is slowly permitting adolescent girls and young women to access digital devices and seek information about their bodies, menstruation, pregnancy prevention, peer pressure, love, pleasure, relationships, contraception and safe abortion. This became more pronounced during the COVID-19 pandemic, which exacerbated the vulnerabilities of girls and women. In Nigeria, the Planned Parenthood of Nigeria  – began delivering sexual reproductive health services using several digital and online platforms including: Short Message Service (SMS), Facebook, WhatsApp, Instagram, Twitter, Zoom and direct telephone calls. These platforms offered accurate, live interactive information and educational sessions, one-to-one consultations and respective referrals. Young people are additionally reached through the Youth Connect website (https://youthconnect.ppfn.org) and ‘The PPFN e-Health App’ which were both co-designed by young people. In Benin, the Association Béninoise pour la Promotion de la Famille introduced online comprehensive sexuality educations sessions, in response to school closures, based on the IPPF’s Framework for CSE: gender, sexual and reproductive health and HIV, sexual rights and sexual citizenship, pleasure, violence, diversity and relationships. In Togo, the Association Togolaise pour le Bien-Etre Familial launched ‘InfoAdoJeunes’, a multi-functional app that was developed for and by young people, providing critical information about sexual and reproductive health in a fun and engaging manner. The 8 navigation tabs: sexuality education, the menstrual cycle, teleconsultation, web TV, games and quizzes, a chat forum, contraception, and a tab where users can ask an experts questions in real-time. These initiatives are proving to be very successful, and feedback, in particular from the young women and girls, has been very positive! Quick, timely, private, online access to information and consultations around sexual health is fun, convenient, non-judgemental and protects their privacy. A win-win all around! We echo UNFPA: To secure an equal future, girls need equal access to digital tools and information. This is why, on this international day of the Girl Child, IPPF’s renews its commitment and call on governments and support to invest in digital technology to ensure adolescents and young girls in Africa can easily access high-quality, accurate information around their sexual and reproductive health and are empowered to make informed decisions about their bodies and their futures. Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry is the Regional Director of the International Planned Parenthood Federation, Africa Region (IPPFAR) and Monica Mwai is a Youth Intern within the Communications Team. By Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry and Monica Mwai The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is one of the leading providers of quality sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services in Africa and a sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy voice in the region. For more updates on our work, follow IPPF Africa Region on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

Ethiopia youth
news_item

| 13 January 2022

“Let’s talk about sex baby”: Responding to the Needs of Adolescent Girls and Young Women in Africa in the Digital Age

In todays’ digital world, everything is available online. Information, products, and services. 22% of the African population, can access the world at the click of a button and mobile penetration rate in Sub-Saharan Africa is at 44%. The African Union and the World Bank Group have committed to connecting every African individual, business, and government by 2030. 60% of Africa’s population is <25 years. The young Africans can be seen on the streets of Nairobi, Accra, and Johannesburg, swiping left and right, using this readily available digital technology for entertainment, education, and learning. Often, and unsurprisingly, this pursuit for knowledge is centered around sex. This phenomenon has though had a less impressive impact on African girls and young women, who continue to be trapped by taboos and restrictive gender and social norms, unable to access accurate sexual and reproductive health and rights information online. The Mobile Gender Gap means only two out of three women in Africa own a mobile phone, and only a third use mobile data regularly. Retrogressive cultural practices and patriarchal norms though are endemic including early marriage, female genital cutting, sexual cleansing, and wife inheritance, exposing them to innumerable risks. STIs, HIV, gender-based sexual violence and teenage pregnancies are commonplace; and complications from pregnancy and childbirth complications remain the leading cause of death among girls aged 15–19 years globally. Today, as we commemorate the International Day of the Girl Child centered on the ‘Digital Generation’ we want to call attention to the rights’ of the girl child and the unique challenges they face globally. IPPFs Youth Action Movement, a peer-led advocacy platform for young people aged 10-24 years, is showing us how the growing technological space is slowly permitting adolescent girls and young women to access digital devices and seek information about their bodies, menstruation, pregnancy prevention, peer pressure, love, pleasure, relationships, contraception and safe abortion. This became more pronounced during the COVID-19 pandemic, which exacerbated the vulnerabilities of girls and women. In Nigeria, the Planned Parenthood of Nigeria  – began delivering sexual reproductive health services using several digital and online platforms including: Short Message Service (SMS), Facebook, WhatsApp, Instagram, Twitter, Zoom and direct telephone calls. These platforms offered accurate, live interactive information and educational sessions, one-to-one consultations and respective referrals. Young people are additionally reached through the Youth Connect website (https://youthconnect.ppfn.org) and ‘The PPFN e-Health App’ which were both co-designed by young people. In Benin, the Association Béninoise pour la Promotion de la Famille introduced online comprehensive sexuality educations sessions, in response to school closures, based on the IPPF’s Framework for CSE: gender, sexual and reproductive health and HIV, sexual rights and sexual citizenship, pleasure, violence, diversity and relationships. In Togo, the Association Togolaise pour le Bien-Etre Familial launched ‘InfoAdoJeunes’, a multi-functional app that was developed for and by young people, providing critical information about sexual and reproductive health in a fun and engaging manner. The 8 navigation tabs: sexuality education, the menstrual cycle, teleconsultation, web TV, games and quizzes, a chat forum, contraception, and a tab where users can ask an experts questions in real-time. These initiatives are proving to be very successful, and feedback, in particular from the young women and girls, has been very positive! Quick, timely, private, online access to information and consultations around sexual health is fun, convenient, non-judgemental and protects their privacy. A win-win all around! We echo UNFPA: To secure an equal future, girls need equal access to digital tools and information. This is why, on this international day of the Girl Child, IPPF’s renews its commitment and call on governments and support to invest in digital technology to ensure adolescents and young girls in Africa can easily access high-quality, accurate information around their sexual and reproductive health and are empowered to make informed decisions about their bodies and their futures. Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry is the Regional Director of the International Planned Parenthood Federation, Africa Region (IPPFAR) and Monica Mwai is a Youth Intern within the Communications Team. By Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry and Monica Mwai The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is one of the leading providers of quality sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services in Africa and a sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy voice in the region. For more updates on our work, follow IPPF Africa Region on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

YOUTH
news item

| 13 January 2022

Africa Youth Month: Taking Stock of Africa’s Commitments to Young People

It is now slightly more than 15 years since the Assembly of the Heads of States of the African Union adopted the Africa Youth Charter in Banjul, The Gambia. Although this Charter provides a strategic framework towards consolidating an approach for the enforcement of meaningful youth involvement in Africa's development agenda, the ideals of this Charter are yet to be realized by young people in their diversities.  Indeed, Africa's development agenda must be linked to the health and well-being of its young people. The United Nations World Population Prospects has documented an incremental growth in young people between the ages of 15 – 24 in Africa since 1952 and this growth has continued to escalate throughout the years. The report also projects that by 2030, over half of the countries in Africa will have more than a 40 per cent increase in the number of young people. These figures demonstrate the need for more meaningful engagement of young people who will be the driving force behind the continent's development agenda.  The sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) of young people in Africa is an agenda that requires a thorough reflection and a particular prioritization by all stakeholders. Young people's sexual and reproductive health needs are most often overlooked due to a myriad of factors, including customs and taboos which impede their access to contraceptives, parental or spousal consent legislations, Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) services that are inadequate or ill-adapted to cater to the diversity of needs of young people. In addition, adolescents and young people lack information on menstrual hygiene, different types of STIs, contraception, prevention of sexual violence, among other topics. Yet this information is vital in enabling them to make informed decisions and equiping them with skills they need to fully enjoy their SRHR. This problematic situation has been worsened by the COVID-19 pandemic, which has exacerbated the vulnerability of young people, with many exposed to sexual and gender-based violence, sexual exploitation, and as well as the closure of clinics and other emergency support services. As many school closed, adolescent girls and young women have been particularly affected and teenage pregnancies have risen as a result of sexual violence and a lack of information on SRH education.     Consequently, this year, as the African Union dedicates the month of November to celebrate Africa’s Youth under the theme " Defining the Future Today: Youth-Led Solutions for Building the Africa We Want”, it is essential that the continent reflects and acts on its commitment towards young people as highlighted in its development agenda 2063 and specifically in the Africa Youth Charter. Young people in Africa are not vulnerable, but they are made vulnerable when they are not involved, heard, engaged, allowed to lead, able to share their ideas of where they want to see the continent in the following years and provided with the knowledge and information necessary to make their own choices and to determine their destiny, particularly concerning their sexual and reproductive health and rights.    Africa is not short of young people who can lead, provide the change we want, and support advancing Africa's development agenda. In Ghana, the Youth Action Movement (YAM), a nationwide network of young people leading and promoting young people's SRHR, has defined itself as a movement by and for Ghanaian youth. The movement’s advocacy on SRHR information and services and young people has led to an increase in young people taking leadership positions, campaigning and  engaging the government on sexual and reproductive health. The YAM has advocated for a positive change in access to youth friendly services at the community level. This has led to an increase in the number of clinics providing youth-friendly SRHR services in Ghana. The movement has also complemented government efforts by providing SRHR information and services to the general population, particularly adolescents, women, men and vulnerable groups, including persons living with a disability. The YAM is also actively involved in linking young people to services through the outreach programme organized by the Planned Parenthood Association of Ghana programme entitled "YENKASA", meaning ‘let's talk’ in local Twi language. Since its establishment in 2020, the contact center has responded to the SRHR needs and challenges of thousands of young people in Ghana.   The youth in Africa continue to demonstrate that they are capable and ready to be entrusted drivers and partners in Africa’s development agenda, including in the field of SRHR. It is now for Africa’s leaders and institutions to give them the trust and the space that they have strived for and earned.   Anita Nyanjong is the Global Lead, Youth at International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF).  Claudia Lawson is the Youth Action Movement (YAM) President, Ghana.

YOUTH
news_item

| 13 January 2022

Africa Youth Month: Taking Stock of Africa’s Commitments to Young People

It is now slightly more than 15 years since the Assembly of the Heads of States of the African Union adopted the Africa Youth Charter in Banjul, The Gambia. Although this Charter provides a strategic framework towards consolidating an approach for the enforcement of meaningful youth involvement in Africa's development agenda, the ideals of this Charter are yet to be realized by young people in their diversities.  Indeed, Africa's development agenda must be linked to the health and well-being of its young people. The United Nations World Population Prospects has documented an incremental growth in young people between the ages of 15 – 24 in Africa since 1952 and this growth has continued to escalate throughout the years. The report also projects that by 2030, over half of the countries in Africa will have more than a 40 per cent increase in the number of young people. These figures demonstrate the need for more meaningful engagement of young people who will be the driving force behind the continent's development agenda.  The sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) of young people in Africa is an agenda that requires a thorough reflection and a particular prioritization by all stakeholders. Young people's sexual and reproductive health needs are most often overlooked due to a myriad of factors, including customs and taboos which impede their access to contraceptives, parental or spousal consent legislations, Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) services that are inadequate or ill-adapted to cater to the diversity of needs of young people. In addition, adolescents and young people lack information on menstrual hygiene, different types of STIs, contraception, prevention of sexual violence, among other topics. Yet this information is vital in enabling them to make informed decisions and equiping them with skills they need to fully enjoy their SRHR. This problematic situation has been worsened by the COVID-19 pandemic, which has exacerbated the vulnerability of young people, with many exposed to sexual and gender-based violence, sexual exploitation, and as well as the closure of clinics and other emergency support services. As many school closed, adolescent girls and young women have been particularly affected and teenage pregnancies have risen as a result of sexual violence and a lack of information on SRH education.     Consequently, this year, as the African Union dedicates the month of November to celebrate Africa’s Youth under the theme " Defining the Future Today: Youth-Led Solutions for Building the Africa We Want”, it is essential that the continent reflects and acts on its commitment towards young people as highlighted in its development agenda 2063 and specifically in the Africa Youth Charter. Young people in Africa are not vulnerable, but they are made vulnerable when they are not involved, heard, engaged, allowed to lead, able to share their ideas of where they want to see the continent in the following years and provided with the knowledge and information necessary to make their own choices and to determine their destiny, particularly concerning their sexual and reproductive health and rights.    Africa is not short of young people who can lead, provide the change we want, and support advancing Africa's development agenda. In Ghana, the Youth Action Movement (YAM), a nationwide network of young people leading and promoting young people's SRHR, has defined itself as a movement by and for Ghanaian youth. The movement’s advocacy on SRHR information and services and young people has led to an increase in young people taking leadership positions, campaigning and  engaging the government on sexual and reproductive health. The YAM has advocated for a positive change in access to youth friendly services at the community level. This has led to an increase in the number of clinics providing youth-friendly SRHR services in Ghana. The movement has also complemented government efforts by providing SRHR information and services to the general population, particularly adolescents, women, men and vulnerable groups, including persons living with a disability. The YAM is also actively involved in linking young people to services through the outreach programme organized by the Planned Parenthood Association of Ghana programme entitled "YENKASA", meaning ‘let's talk’ in local Twi language. Since its establishment in 2020, the contact center has responded to the SRHR needs and challenges of thousands of young people in Ghana.   The youth in Africa continue to demonstrate that they are capable and ready to be entrusted drivers and partners in Africa’s development agenda, including in the field of SRHR. It is now for Africa’s leaders and institutions to give them the trust and the space that they have strived for and earned.   Anita Nyanjong is the Global Lead, Youth at International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF).  Claudia Lawson is the Youth Action Movement (YAM) President, Ghana.

NIGER
news item

| 13 January 2022

Sommet des filles africaines 2021: l’IPPF réaffirme son engagement dans la lutte contre toute forme de violence à l'égard des femmes et des filles.

La Directrice régionale de la Fédération Internationale pour la Planification Familiale (IPPF) Afrique a activement pris part au au Sommet des filles Africaines à Niamey, au Niger, du 16 au 18 Novembre 2021.  Organisé par la Commission de l’Union Africaine, le Sommet des filles africaines vise à accélérer la réalisation de leurs droits, notamment l’élimination des pratiques néfastes - dont la mutilation génitale féminine, le mariage précoce ou encore le bandages des seins - mais aussi leurs droits à l’éducation et à la santé sexuelle et reproductive. Il s’agit du troisième sommet sur ce thème, la première édition s’étant tenue à Lusaka en Zambie du 26 au 27 Novembre 2015 et le 2ème sommet à Accra au Ghana du 21 au 24 Novembre 2018. Durant la cérémonie d’ouverture, la représentante de l’Envoyée spéciale du Secrétaire Général des Nations Unies sur les questions de violences contre les enfants, Mme Najat Maalla M’Jid, a partagé un message fort : « nous devons garder à l’esprit que les enfants et les jeunes d’Afrique représentent un capital, constituent la source la plus riche d’Afrique, avec une population qui ne cesse d'accroître et qui devrait atteindre 830 millions d’ici 2050». Dans son allocution, le Chef d’Etat du Niger, Mohamed Bazoum a, quant à lui, affirmé que la thématique du sommet confirme « l’engagement des pays africains à œuvrer solidairement pour le développement humain sur le continent en s’appuyant en particulier sur les femmes et les jeunes ». Selon lui, « Nous avons donc, à travers cette rencontre, l’occasion d’analyser, de suivre et de mieux orienter les actions de nos Etats en matière de protection des droits humains des filles qui constituent une frange importante de la population de nos pays ». L’IPPF a pour sa part marqué sa participation à travers l’intervention de la Directrice régionale pour l’Afrique, Mme Marie-Evelyne Pétrus-Barry lors de deux panels, consacrés respectivement aux thèmes: "L’impact de la COVID-19 sur les femmes et les filles: une réponse intégrée" et "Les jeunes s'engagent auprès des États membres pour mettre fin aux pratiques néfastes". Lors de ces échanges, la directrice régionale a réaffirmé « l’engagement de l’IPPF à poursuivre la lutte contre toute forme de violence à l'égard des femmes et des filles, de protéger leurs droits et de garantir la fourniture et l'accès aux services et aux informations nécessaires à la protection de leur santé et de leur bien-être ».  Elle a tenu a souligner l’impact dévastateur des pratiques néfastes sur la santé sexuelle et reproductive des femmes et des filles, ainsi que sur leur santé mentale et psychosociale: “Les mutilations génitales féminines et les mariages d'enfants sont tous deux liés à des taux élevés de mortalité maternelle et à un faible recours à la planification familiale amenant à des grossesses non désirées. Ils privent les femmes de la possibilité d'être éduquées, de devenir des êtres imaginatifs, novateurs et créatifs, de s'ouvrir à de nouvelles possibilités et de profiter, elles et leurs familles, de tous les avantages qu'apporte un emploi décent”.  Elle a également relevé le travail abattu par ses associations membres en matière d’innovation et de capacité de résilience face aux défis de la COVID-19 . « Elles ont, entre autres, développé simultanément la télémédecine, le porte-à-porte et leurs cliniques mobiles pour répondre aux besoins des femmes confinées en matière de SSR, numérisé l'éducation sexuelle pour les jeunes privés d’école, etc. »  Elle a enfin tenu à célébrer l’action des jeunes et à les remercier pour leurs actions en faveur des droits sexuels et reproductifs sur le continent: “Merci jeunes femmes et jeunes hommes, merci pour tout ce que vous faites aujourd’hui, et pour les nombreuses choses que vous allez encore accomplir. Je vous adresse ma grande admiration et je pense que je parle au nom de nombreuses personnes de mon âge lorsque je dis que nous vous admirons et que nous sommes prêts à recevoir votre enseignement”.  Il est du devoir de l’IPPF d’appuyer les jeunes, notamment les jeunes femmes et filles, et de leur apporter tout le soutien dont ils ont besoin pour concrétiser et mettre en action leurs engagements collectifs en faveur des droits sexuels et reproductifs. L’IPPF est et restera à leurs côtés. 

NIGER
news_item

| 18 November 2021

Sommet des filles africaines 2021: l’IPPF réaffirme son engagement dans la lutte contre toute forme de violence à l'égard des femmes et des filles.

La Directrice régionale de la Fédération Internationale pour la Planification Familiale (IPPF) Afrique a activement pris part au au Sommet des filles Africaines à Niamey, au Niger, du 16 au 18 Novembre 2021.  Organisé par la Commission de l’Union Africaine, le Sommet des filles africaines vise à accélérer la réalisation de leurs droits, notamment l’élimination des pratiques néfastes - dont la mutilation génitale féminine, le mariage précoce ou encore le bandages des seins - mais aussi leurs droits à l’éducation et à la santé sexuelle et reproductive. Il s’agit du troisième sommet sur ce thème, la première édition s’étant tenue à Lusaka en Zambie du 26 au 27 Novembre 2015 et le 2ème sommet à Accra au Ghana du 21 au 24 Novembre 2018. Durant la cérémonie d’ouverture, la représentante de l’Envoyée spéciale du Secrétaire Général des Nations Unies sur les questions de violences contre les enfants, Mme Najat Maalla M’Jid, a partagé un message fort : « nous devons garder à l’esprit que les enfants et les jeunes d’Afrique représentent un capital, constituent la source la plus riche d’Afrique, avec une population qui ne cesse d'accroître et qui devrait atteindre 830 millions d’ici 2050». Dans son allocution, le Chef d’Etat du Niger, Mohamed Bazoum a, quant à lui, affirmé que la thématique du sommet confirme « l’engagement des pays africains à œuvrer solidairement pour le développement humain sur le continent en s’appuyant en particulier sur les femmes et les jeunes ». Selon lui, « Nous avons donc, à travers cette rencontre, l’occasion d’analyser, de suivre et de mieux orienter les actions de nos Etats en matière de protection des droits humains des filles qui constituent une frange importante de la population de nos pays ». L’IPPF a pour sa part marqué sa participation à travers l’intervention de la Directrice régionale pour l’Afrique, Mme Marie-Evelyne Pétrus-Barry lors de deux panels, consacrés respectivement aux thèmes: "L’impact de la COVID-19 sur les femmes et les filles: une réponse intégrée" et "Les jeunes s'engagent auprès des États membres pour mettre fin aux pratiques néfastes". Lors de ces échanges, la directrice régionale a réaffirmé « l’engagement de l’IPPF à poursuivre la lutte contre toute forme de violence à l'égard des femmes et des filles, de protéger leurs droits et de garantir la fourniture et l'accès aux services et aux informations nécessaires à la protection de leur santé et de leur bien-être ».  Elle a tenu a souligner l’impact dévastateur des pratiques néfastes sur la santé sexuelle et reproductive des femmes et des filles, ainsi que sur leur santé mentale et psychosociale: “Les mutilations génitales féminines et les mariages d'enfants sont tous deux liés à des taux élevés de mortalité maternelle et à un faible recours à la planification familiale amenant à des grossesses non désirées. Ils privent les femmes de la possibilité d'être éduquées, de devenir des êtres imaginatifs, novateurs et créatifs, de s'ouvrir à de nouvelles possibilités et de profiter, elles et leurs familles, de tous les avantages qu'apporte un emploi décent”.  Elle a également relevé le travail abattu par ses associations membres en matière d’innovation et de capacité de résilience face aux défis de la COVID-19 . « Elles ont, entre autres, développé simultanément la télémédecine, le porte-à-porte et leurs cliniques mobiles pour répondre aux besoins des femmes confinées en matière de SSR, numérisé l'éducation sexuelle pour les jeunes privés d’école, etc. »  Elle a enfin tenu à célébrer l’action des jeunes et à les remercier pour leurs actions en faveur des droits sexuels et reproductifs sur le continent: “Merci jeunes femmes et jeunes hommes, merci pour tout ce que vous faites aujourd’hui, et pour les nombreuses choses que vous allez encore accomplir. Je vous adresse ma grande admiration et je pense que je parle au nom de nombreuses personnes de mon âge lorsque je dis que nous vous admirons et que nous sommes prêts à recevoir votre enseignement”.  Il est du devoir de l’IPPF d’appuyer les jeunes, notamment les jeunes femmes et filles, et de leur apporter tout le soutien dont ils ont besoin pour concrétiser et mettre en action leurs engagements collectifs en faveur des droits sexuels et reproductifs. L’IPPF est et restera à leurs côtés. 

IPPF EN CI
news item

| 13 January 2022

Ancrage de l’IPPF en l’Afrique de l’Ouest et du Centre : les autorités ivoiriennes donnent leur accord pour l’ouverture d’un bureau sous régional de l’IPPF en Côte d’Ivoire

Abidjan le 10 novembre 2021 – Du 02 au 10 novembre 2021, une mission de haut niveau du bureau régional Afrique de la Fédération Internationale pour la Planification Familiale (IPPF) a séjourné en Côte d’Ivoire. Conduite par sa directrice régionale, Mme Marie-Evelyne Pétrus-Barry, l’objectif principal de la mission était de rencontrer les autorités ivoiriennes et d’aborder la question du projet d’ouverture d’un bureau sous-régional pour l'Afrique de l'Ouest et du centre à Abidjan. En ouvrant ce nouveau bureau, l’IPPF ambitionne de mieux servir ses associations membres, notamment celles des pays francophones d'Afrique de l'Ouest et du Centre, et de répondre à la volonté croissante des bailleurs de fonds de financer des projets et programmes dans cette région. Le Bureau régional de l’IPPF, basé à Nairobi (Kenya), est une organisation internationale de droits humains centrée sur la planification familiale et la santé de la reproduction. Elle est présente dans 39 pays de la région de l’Afrique subsaharienne, dont la Côte d’Ivoire, par le biais d’associations membres opérant localement. Elle représente le plus grand réseau d’associations dédiées aux droits des femmes et de la planification familiale en Afrique. En Côte d’Ivoire, l’Association Ivoirienne pour le Bien-Être Familial (AIBEF) est l’association membre de l’IPPF. En compagnie des responsables de l’AIBEF, la délégation de l’IPPF a rencontré successivement le Ministre Délégué auprès du Ministre d’État, Ministre des Affaires Etrangères, de l’Intégration Africaine et de la Diaspora; M. Alcide DJEDJE ; la Ministre de la Solidarité et de la Lutte contre la pauvreté, Mme Myss Belmonde DOGO ; la Ministre de la Femme, de la Famille et de l’Enfant, Mme Nassénéba TOURÉ ; la Ministre d’État, ministre des Affaires étrangères, de l’Intégration Africaine et de la Diaspora, Mme Kandia KAMISSOKO CAMARA et enfin, le Premier Ministre, Chef du Gouvernement, M. Patrick Jérôme ACHI. Les échanges ont permis à la délégation de présenter le mandat de l’IPPF, ses résultats en Afrique et de solliciter formellement un accord de siège pour le futur bureau sous régional de l’IPPF. Les officiels ivoiriens ont salué le travail de l’IPPF en matière de santé sexuelle et reproductive et exprimé leur enthousiasme à accueillir le nouveau bureau de l’organisation dans le pays. Un accord de principe a été donné par la Ministre d’État, ministre des Affaires étrangères, de l’Intégration Africaine et de la Diaspora, Mme Kandia KAMISSOKO CAMARA et le Premier Ministre, Chef du Gouvernement, M. Patrick Jérôme ACHI en attendant que les différentes équipes s’attellent à la formalisation des étapes administratives d’installation du nouveau bureau.

IPPF EN CI
news_item

| 11 November 2021

Ancrage de l’IPPF en l’Afrique de l’Ouest et du Centre : les autorités ivoiriennes donnent leur accord pour l’ouverture d’un bureau sous régional de l’IPPF en Côte d’Ivoire

Abidjan le 10 novembre 2021 – Du 02 au 10 novembre 2021, une mission de haut niveau du bureau régional Afrique de la Fédération Internationale pour la Planification Familiale (IPPF) a séjourné en Côte d’Ivoire. Conduite par sa directrice régionale, Mme Marie-Evelyne Pétrus-Barry, l’objectif principal de la mission était de rencontrer les autorités ivoiriennes et d’aborder la question du projet d’ouverture d’un bureau sous-régional pour l'Afrique de l'Ouest et du centre à Abidjan. En ouvrant ce nouveau bureau, l’IPPF ambitionne de mieux servir ses associations membres, notamment celles des pays francophones d'Afrique de l'Ouest et du Centre, et de répondre à la volonté croissante des bailleurs de fonds de financer des projets et programmes dans cette région. Le Bureau régional de l’IPPF, basé à Nairobi (Kenya), est une organisation internationale de droits humains centrée sur la planification familiale et la santé de la reproduction. Elle est présente dans 39 pays de la région de l’Afrique subsaharienne, dont la Côte d’Ivoire, par le biais d’associations membres opérant localement. Elle représente le plus grand réseau d’associations dédiées aux droits des femmes et de la planification familiale en Afrique. En Côte d’Ivoire, l’Association Ivoirienne pour le Bien-Être Familial (AIBEF) est l’association membre de l’IPPF. En compagnie des responsables de l’AIBEF, la délégation de l’IPPF a rencontré successivement le Ministre Délégué auprès du Ministre d’État, Ministre des Affaires Etrangères, de l’Intégration Africaine et de la Diaspora; M. Alcide DJEDJE ; la Ministre de la Solidarité et de la Lutte contre la pauvreté, Mme Myss Belmonde DOGO ; la Ministre de la Femme, de la Famille et de l’Enfant, Mme Nassénéba TOURÉ ; la Ministre d’État, ministre des Affaires étrangères, de l’Intégration Africaine et de la Diaspora, Mme Kandia KAMISSOKO CAMARA et enfin, le Premier Ministre, Chef du Gouvernement, M. Patrick Jérôme ACHI. Les échanges ont permis à la délégation de présenter le mandat de l’IPPF, ses résultats en Afrique et de solliciter formellement un accord de siège pour le futur bureau sous régional de l’IPPF. Les officiels ivoiriens ont salué le travail de l’IPPF en matière de santé sexuelle et reproductive et exprimé leur enthousiasme à accueillir le nouveau bureau de l’organisation dans le pays. Un accord de principe a été donné par la Ministre d’État, ministre des Affaires étrangères, de l’Intégration Africaine et de la Diaspora, Mme Kandia KAMISSOKO CAMARA et le Premier Ministre, Chef du Gouvernement, M. Patrick Jérôme ACHI en attendant que les différentes équipes s’attellent à la formalisation des étapes administratives d’installation du nouveau bureau.

YOUTH
news item

| 13 January 2022

Mois de la jeunesse africaine : Faisons le point sur les engagements de l'Afrique envers les jeunes !

Cela fait maintenant un peu plus de 15 ans que l'Assemblée des chefs d'État de l'Union africaine a adopté la Charte africaine de la jeunesse à Banjul, en Gambie. Bien que cette Charte fournisse un cadre stratégique visant à renforcer de manière significative la participation des jeunes dans l'agenda de développement de l'Afrique, les idéaux de cette Charte doivent encore être réalisés par les jeunes, dans toute leur diversité. En effet, le programme de développement de l'Afrique doit être lié à la santé et au bien-être de ses jeunes. Le rapport des Nations unies sur les projections démographiques mondiales fait état d'une augmentation progressive du nombre de jeunes âgés de 15 à 24 ans en Afrique depuis 1952, et cette augmentation n'a cessé de croître au fil des ans. Le rapport prévoit également que d'ici 2030, plus de la moitié des pays d'Afrique connaîtront une augmentation de plus de 40 % du nombre de jeunes. Ces chiffres démontrent la nécessité d'un engagement plus significatif des jeunes qui seront la force motrice de l'agenda de développement du continent. La santé et les droits sexuels et reproductifs (SDSR) des jeunes en Afrique sont un sujet qui nécessite une réflexion approfondie et une priorité particulière de la part de toutes les parties prenantes. Les besoins des jeunes en matière de santé sexuelle et reproductive (SSR) sont le plus souvent négligés en raison d'une myriade de facteurs, notamment les coutumes et les tabous qui entravent leur accès aux contraceptifs, les législations sur le consentement parental ou conjugal, les services de SSR qui sont inadéquats ou mal adaptés pour répondre à la diversité des besoins des jeunes. En outre, les adolescents et les jeunes manquent d'informations sur l'hygiène menstruelle, les différents types d'IST, la contraception, la prévention de la violence sexuelle, entre autres sujets. Ces informations sont pourtant essentielles pour leur permettre de prendre des décisions en connaissance de cause et les doter des compétences dont ils ont besoin pour profiter pleinement de leurs DSSR. Cette situation problématique a été aggravée par la pandémie de COVID-19, qui a exacerbé la vulnérabilité des jeunes, nombre d'entre eux étant exposés à la violence sexuelle et sexiste, à l'exploitation sexuelle, ainsi qu'à la fermeture des cliniques et autres services d'aide d'urgence. Avec la fermeture de nombreuses écoles, les adolescentes et les jeunes femmes ont été particulièrement touchées et les grossesses précoces ont augmenté en raison des violences sexuelles et du manque d'informations sur la SSR.  Par conséquent, cette année, alors que l'Union africaine consacre le mois de novembre à la jeunesse africaine sous le thème "Définir l'avenir aujourd'hui: Des solutions menées par les jeunes pour construire l'Afrique que nous voulons", il est essentiel que le continent réfléchisse et agisse en fonction de son engagement envers les jeunes, tel que souligné dans son agenda 2063 et plus particulièrement dans la Charte africaine de la jeunesse. Les jeunes en Afrique ne sont pas vulnérables, mais on les rend vulnérables lorsqu'ils ne sont pas impliqués, entendus, engagés, autorisés à diriger, capables de partager leurs idées sur ce qu'ils veulent voir du continent dans les années à venir et dotés des connaissances et des informations nécessaires pour faire leurs propres choix et déterminer leur destin, notamment en ce qui concerne leur SDSR.  L'Afrique ne manque pas de jeunes capables de diriger, d'apporter le changement que nous souhaitons et de contribuer à faire avancer le programme de développement de l'Afrique. Au Ghana, le Mouvement d’Action des Jeunes (MAJ), un réseau national de jeunes menant et promouvant la SDSR des jeunes, s'est défini comme un mouvement par et pour la jeunesse ghanéenne. Le plaidoyer du mouvement en faveur de l'information et des services de SDSR et des jeunes a conduit à une augmentation du nombre de jeunes occupant des postes de direction, faisant campagne et engageant le gouvernement sur la SSR. Le MAJ a plaidé pour un changement positif dans l'accès aux services adaptés aux jeunes au niveau communautaire. Cela a conduit à une augmentation du nombre de cliniques offrant des services de SSR adaptés aux jeunes au Ghana. Le mouvement a également complété les efforts du gouvernement en fournissant des informations et des services de SDSR à la population générale, en particulier aux adolescents, aux femmes, aux hommes et aux groupes vulnérables, y compris les personnes vivant avec un handicap. Le MAJ participe aussi activement à la mise en relation des jeunes avec les services par le biais du programme de sensibilisation organisé par le programme de l'Association de planification familiale du Ghana, intitulé "YENKASA", qui signifie "parlons" en langue locale Twi. Depuis sa création en 2020, le centre de contact a répondu aux besoins et aux défis en matière de SDSR de milliers de jeunes au Ghana. Les jeunes d'Afrique continuent de démontrer qu'ils sont capables et prêts à être les moteurs et les partenaires du programme de développement de l'Afrique, y compris dans le domaine de la SDSR. Il appartient maintenant aux dirigeants et aux institutions de l'Afrique de leur accorder la confiance et l'espace qu'ils ont recherchés et mérités. Anita Nyanjong, Lead Global, Jeunes de la Fédération Internationale pour la Planification Familiale, bureau Afrique (IPPFAR) Claudia Lawson, Présidente du Mouvement d’Action des Jeunes du Ghana

YOUTH
news_item

| 01 November 2021

Mois de la jeunesse africaine : Faisons le point sur les engagements de l'Afrique envers les jeunes !

Cela fait maintenant un peu plus de 15 ans que l'Assemblée des chefs d'État de l'Union africaine a adopté la Charte africaine de la jeunesse à Banjul, en Gambie. Bien que cette Charte fournisse un cadre stratégique visant à renforcer de manière significative la participation des jeunes dans l'agenda de développement de l'Afrique, les idéaux de cette Charte doivent encore être réalisés par les jeunes, dans toute leur diversité. En effet, le programme de développement de l'Afrique doit être lié à la santé et au bien-être de ses jeunes. Le rapport des Nations unies sur les projections démographiques mondiales fait état d'une augmentation progressive du nombre de jeunes âgés de 15 à 24 ans en Afrique depuis 1952, et cette augmentation n'a cessé de croître au fil des ans. Le rapport prévoit également que d'ici 2030, plus de la moitié des pays d'Afrique connaîtront une augmentation de plus de 40 % du nombre de jeunes. Ces chiffres démontrent la nécessité d'un engagement plus significatif des jeunes qui seront la force motrice de l'agenda de développement du continent. La santé et les droits sexuels et reproductifs (SDSR) des jeunes en Afrique sont un sujet qui nécessite une réflexion approfondie et une priorité particulière de la part de toutes les parties prenantes. Les besoins des jeunes en matière de santé sexuelle et reproductive (SSR) sont le plus souvent négligés en raison d'une myriade de facteurs, notamment les coutumes et les tabous qui entravent leur accès aux contraceptifs, les législations sur le consentement parental ou conjugal, les services de SSR qui sont inadéquats ou mal adaptés pour répondre à la diversité des besoins des jeunes. En outre, les adolescents et les jeunes manquent d'informations sur l'hygiène menstruelle, les différents types d'IST, la contraception, la prévention de la violence sexuelle, entre autres sujets. Ces informations sont pourtant essentielles pour leur permettre de prendre des décisions en connaissance de cause et les doter des compétences dont ils ont besoin pour profiter pleinement de leurs DSSR. Cette situation problématique a été aggravée par la pandémie de COVID-19, qui a exacerbé la vulnérabilité des jeunes, nombre d'entre eux étant exposés à la violence sexuelle et sexiste, à l'exploitation sexuelle, ainsi qu'à la fermeture des cliniques et autres services d'aide d'urgence. Avec la fermeture de nombreuses écoles, les adolescentes et les jeunes femmes ont été particulièrement touchées et les grossesses précoces ont augmenté en raison des violences sexuelles et du manque d'informations sur la SSR.  Par conséquent, cette année, alors que l'Union africaine consacre le mois de novembre à la jeunesse africaine sous le thème "Définir l'avenir aujourd'hui: Des solutions menées par les jeunes pour construire l'Afrique que nous voulons", il est essentiel que le continent réfléchisse et agisse en fonction de son engagement envers les jeunes, tel que souligné dans son agenda 2063 et plus particulièrement dans la Charte africaine de la jeunesse. Les jeunes en Afrique ne sont pas vulnérables, mais on les rend vulnérables lorsqu'ils ne sont pas impliqués, entendus, engagés, autorisés à diriger, capables de partager leurs idées sur ce qu'ils veulent voir du continent dans les années à venir et dotés des connaissances et des informations nécessaires pour faire leurs propres choix et déterminer leur destin, notamment en ce qui concerne leur SDSR.  L'Afrique ne manque pas de jeunes capables de diriger, d'apporter le changement que nous souhaitons et de contribuer à faire avancer le programme de développement de l'Afrique. Au Ghana, le Mouvement d’Action des Jeunes (MAJ), un réseau national de jeunes menant et promouvant la SDSR des jeunes, s'est défini comme un mouvement par et pour la jeunesse ghanéenne. Le plaidoyer du mouvement en faveur de l'information et des services de SDSR et des jeunes a conduit à une augmentation du nombre de jeunes occupant des postes de direction, faisant campagne et engageant le gouvernement sur la SSR. Le MAJ a plaidé pour un changement positif dans l'accès aux services adaptés aux jeunes au niveau communautaire. Cela a conduit à une augmentation du nombre de cliniques offrant des services de SSR adaptés aux jeunes au Ghana. Le mouvement a également complété les efforts du gouvernement en fournissant des informations et des services de SDSR à la population générale, en particulier aux adolescents, aux femmes, aux hommes et aux groupes vulnérables, y compris les personnes vivant avec un handicap. Le MAJ participe aussi activement à la mise en relation des jeunes avec les services par le biais du programme de sensibilisation organisé par le programme de l'Association de planification familiale du Ghana, intitulé "YENKASA", qui signifie "parlons" en langue locale Twi. Depuis sa création en 2020, le centre de contact a répondu aux besoins et aux défis en matière de SDSR de milliers de jeunes au Ghana. Les jeunes d'Afrique continuent de démontrer qu'ils sont capables et prêts à être les moteurs et les partenaires du programme de développement de l'Afrique, y compris dans le domaine de la SDSR. Il appartient maintenant aux dirigeants et aux institutions de l'Afrique de leur accorder la confiance et l'espace qu'ils ont recherchés et mérités. Anita Nyanjong, Lead Global, Jeunes de la Fédération Internationale pour la Planification Familiale, bureau Afrique (IPPFAR) Claudia Lawson, Présidente du Mouvement d’Action des Jeunes du Ghana

Uganda
news item

| 13 January 2022

Putting All Women at the Centre of our Work, no Matter Where they Live

More than half of Africa’s women live in rural areas. These women and girls, though diverse in their identities and situations, face similar barriers in accessing critical and timely sexual and reproductive health information, services and commodities. They often live at great distances from health facilities, which often turn into perilous and difficult journeys; the services are often inadequate and costly, medical staff are poorly trained or often just absent; services provided lack confidentiality; women are faced with long waiting hours, work and family obligations and the constant fear of stigmatization and discrimination. The list is truly endless. Additionally, those that may need to access health services lack awareness and knowledge of when and where to seek it. Comprehensive Sexuality Education (CSE) is conspicuously absent from school curriculums, and young girls are often unaware of concepts as basic as menstrual hygiene. Rural women and girls, more so that their urban counterparts, also lack knowledge about contraception and safe maternal health practices. They live in largely patriarchal societies, they cannot make independence choices and lack bodily autonomy. They lack choice as to when to have sex, when to have children, whether and if they can use contraception. Not surprisingly, there are up to three times more pregnancies among teenage girls in rural and indigenous areas than in urban populations. This is all the more concerning when complications from pregnancy and childbirth are the leading cause of death among girls aged 15–19 years globally. Women in rural areas also have lower access to safe abortions, given that few healthcare providers are able or willing to provide these services, even where safe abortion is an option. This, coupled with a lack of accurate knowledge of safe abortion and a strong fear of stigmatisation, means many women resort to seeking unsafe abortion services despite knowing about their risks. In Africa, 99% of abortions are unsafe, resulting in one maternal death per 150 cases.   IPPF Africa Regional office works with Member Associations across Africa to deliver critical sexual and reproductive health services through a strong network of clinics, often located in very remote rural areas and many times the only health structure present. These clinics work in coordination with Government health structures, providing most services free-of-cost; and run regular training sessions to ensure medical practitioners have access to up-to-date medical knowledge. They also invest in the health structures of rural government-owned facilities to ensure delivery of high-quality health services. In areas with no health centers, MAs conduct regular mobile health clinics, where they provide integrated reproductive health services to isolated rural populations. Further, models of social franchising, implemented for example by the Family Guidance of Ethiopia (FGAE), have proven to be successful in addressing the needs of many women and girls in remote areas. This kind of model entails a contractual relationship between franchisee and franchiser where the franchisee agrees to produce or market some important SRH products or services in accordance with an overall “Blue Print” devised by the franchiser. To ensure a strong and complete continuum of care, a high number of Community Health Extension Workers (CHEWs) are recruited and trained. They conduct home visits, providing accurate information, basic services, and commodities. Also, with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, new approaches were piloted. The Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia introduced a new initiative teaching women and  adolescent girls’ to self-administer contraceptives, building their skills, knowledge, capacity and confidence to self-manage their contraceptive needs, and reducing their need to access health facilities. All Member Association initiatives prioritize youth-friendly services, which go a long way in ensuring that girls and young women access SRHR information and services and are empowered to make informed decisions, no matter where they live. Through in-and-out-of-school programmes, peer educators under the Youth Action Movement (YAM) provide SRHR information and distribute condoms to young people in rural areas. Through our advocacy efforts at national, regional and global levels, we raise our voices advocating for all women, ensuring that none is left behind. This goes in tandem with SDG 5: achieving gender equality and empowering all women and girls including rural women. We are relentless in holding governments accountable over their commitments to various instruments, including the Maputo Plan of Action (MPoA) and the Abuja Declaration. Through its programmes, IPPFAR is committed to ensuring that all women and girls can fully exercise their reproductive rights. This is why today, on the International Day of Rural Women, we call on all Governments in Africa to invest in access to quality sexual and reproductive health for rural women and girls. For more updates on our work, follow IPPF Africa Region on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

Uganda
news_item

| 15 October 2021

Putting All Women at the Centre of our Work, no Matter Where they Live

More than half of Africa’s women live in rural areas. These women and girls, though diverse in their identities and situations, face similar barriers in accessing critical and timely sexual and reproductive health information, services and commodities. They often live at great distances from health facilities, which often turn into perilous and difficult journeys; the services are often inadequate and costly, medical staff are poorly trained or often just absent; services provided lack confidentiality; women are faced with long waiting hours, work and family obligations and the constant fear of stigmatization and discrimination. The list is truly endless. Additionally, those that may need to access health services lack awareness and knowledge of when and where to seek it. Comprehensive Sexuality Education (CSE) is conspicuously absent from school curriculums, and young girls are often unaware of concepts as basic as menstrual hygiene. Rural women and girls, more so that their urban counterparts, also lack knowledge about contraception and safe maternal health practices. They live in largely patriarchal societies, they cannot make independence choices and lack bodily autonomy. They lack choice as to when to have sex, when to have children, whether and if they can use contraception. Not surprisingly, there are up to three times more pregnancies among teenage girls in rural and indigenous areas than in urban populations. This is all the more concerning when complications from pregnancy and childbirth are the leading cause of death among girls aged 15–19 years globally. Women in rural areas also have lower access to safe abortions, given that few healthcare providers are able or willing to provide these services, even where safe abortion is an option. This, coupled with a lack of accurate knowledge of safe abortion and a strong fear of stigmatisation, means many women resort to seeking unsafe abortion services despite knowing about their risks. In Africa, 99% of abortions are unsafe, resulting in one maternal death per 150 cases.   IPPF Africa Regional office works with Member Associations across Africa to deliver critical sexual and reproductive health services through a strong network of clinics, often located in very remote rural areas and many times the only health structure present. These clinics work in coordination with Government health structures, providing most services free-of-cost; and run regular training sessions to ensure medical practitioners have access to up-to-date medical knowledge. They also invest in the health structures of rural government-owned facilities to ensure delivery of high-quality health services. In areas with no health centers, MAs conduct regular mobile health clinics, where they provide integrated reproductive health services to isolated rural populations. Further, models of social franchising, implemented for example by the Family Guidance of Ethiopia (FGAE), have proven to be successful in addressing the needs of many women and girls in remote areas. This kind of model entails a contractual relationship between franchisee and franchiser where the franchisee agrees to produce or market some important SRH products or services in accordance with an overall “Blue Print” devised by the franchiser. To ensure a strong and complete continuum of care, a high number of Community Health Extension Workers (CHEWs) are recruited and trained. They conduct home visits, providing accurate information, basic services, and commodities. Also, with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, new approaches were piloted. The Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia introduced a new initiative teaching women and  adolescent girls’ to self-administer contraceptives, building their skills, knowledge, capacity and confidence to self-manage their contraceptive needs, and reducing their need to access health facilities. All Member Association initiatives prioritize youth-friendly services, which go a long way in ensuring that girls and young women access SRHR information and services and are empowered to make informed decisions, no matter where they live. Through in-and-out-of-school programmes, peer educators under the Youth Action Movement (YAM) provide SRHR information and distribute condoms to young people in rural areas. Through our advocacy efforts at national, regional and global levels, we raise our voices advocating for all women, ensuring that none is left behind. This goes in tandem with SDG 5: achieving gender equality and empowering all women and girls including rural women. We are relentless in holding governments accountable over their commitments to various instruments, including the Maputo Plan of Action (MPoA) and the Abuja Declaration. Through its programmes, IPPFAR is committed to ensuring that all women and girls can fully exercise their reproductive rights. This is why today, on the International Day of Rural Women, we call on all Governments in Africa to invest in access to quality sexual and reproductive health for rural women and girls. For more updates on our work, follow IPPF Africa Region on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

Ethiopia youth
news item

| 13 January 2022

“Let’s talk about sex baby”: Responding to the Needs of Adolescent Girls and Young Women in Africa in the Digital Age

In todays’ digital world, everything is available online. Information, products, and services. 22% of the African population, can access the world at the click of a button and mobile penetration rate in Sub-Saharan Africa is at 44%. The African Union and the World Bank Group have committed to connecting every African individual, business, and government by 2030. 60% of Africa’s population is <25 years. The young Africans can be seen on the streets of Nairobi, Accra, and Johannesburg, swiping left and right, using this readily available digital technology for entertainment, education, and learning. Often, and unsurprisingly, this pursuit for knowledge is centered around sex. This phenomenon has though had a less impressive impact on African girls and young women, who continue to be trapped by taboos and restrictive gender and social norms, unable to access accurate sexual and reproductive health and rights information online. The Mobile Gender Gap means only two out of three women in Africa own a mobile phone, and only a third use mobile data regularly. Retrogressive cultural practices and patriarchal norms though are endemic including early marriage, female genital cutting, sexual cleansing, and wife inheritance, exposing them to innumerable risks. STIs, HIV, gender-based sexual violence and teenage pregnancies are commonplace; and complications from pregnancy and childbirth complications remain the leading cause of death among girls aged 15–19 years globally. Today, as we commemorate the International Day of the Girl Child centered on the ‘Digital Generation’ we want to call attention to the rights’ of the girl child and the unique challenges they face globally. IPPFs Youth Action Movement, a peer-led advocacy platform for young people aged 10-24 years, is showing us how the growing technological space is slowly permitting adolescent girls and young women to access digital devices and seek information about their bodies, menstruation, pregnancy prevention, peer pressure, love, pleasure, relationships, contraception and safe abortion. This became more pronounced during the COVID-19 pandemic, which exacerbated the vulnerabilities of girls and women. In Nigeria, the Planned Parenthood of Nigeria  – began delivering sexual reproductive health services using several digital and online platforms including: Short Message Service (SMS), Facebook, WhatsApp, Instagram, Twitter, Zoom and direct telephone calls. These platforms offered accurate, live interactive information and educational sessions, one-to-one consultations and respective referrals. Young people are additionally reached through the Youth Connect website (https://youthconnect.ppfn.org) and ‘The PPFN e-Health App’ which were both co-designed by young people. In Benin, the Association Béninoise pour la Promotion de la Famille introduced online comprehensive sexuality educations sessions, in response to school closures, based on the IPPF’s Framework for CSE: gender, sexual and reproductive health and HIV, sexual rights and sexual citizenship, pleasure, violence, diversity and relationships. In Togo, the Association Togolaise pour le Bien-Etre Familial launched ‘InfoAdoJeunes’, a multi-functional app that was developed for and by young people, providing critical information about sexual and reproductive health in a fun and engaging manner. The 8 navigation tabs: sexuality education, the menstrual cycle, teleconsultation, web TV, games and quizzes, a chat forum, contraception, and a tab where users can ask an experts questions in real-time. These initiatives are proving to be very successful, and feedback, in particular from the young women and girls, has been very positive! Quick, timely, private, online access to information and consultations around sexual health is fun, convenient, non-judgemental and protects their privacy. A win-win all around! We echo UNFPA: To secure an equal future, girls need equal access to digital tools and information. This is why, on this international day of the Girl Child, IPPF’s renews its commitment and call on governments and support to invest in digital technology to ensure adolescents and young girls in Africa can easily access high-quality, accurate information around their sexual and reproductive health and are empowered to make informed decisions about their bodies and their futures. Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry is the Regional Director of the International Planned Parenthood Federation, Africa Region (IPPFAR) and Monica Mwai is a Youth Intern within the Communications Team. By Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry and Monica Mwai The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is one of the leading providers of quality sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services in Africa and a sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy voice in the region. For more updates on our work, follow IPPF Africa Region on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

Ethiopia youth
news_item

| 13 January 2022

“Let’s talk about sex baby”: Responding to the Needs of Adolescent Girls and Young Women in Africa in the Digital Age

In todays’ digital world, everything is available online. Information, products, and services. 22% of the African population, can access the world at the click of a button and mobile penetration rate in Sub-Saharan Africa is at 44%. The African Union and the World Bank Group have committed to connecting every African individual, business, and government by 2030. 60% of Africa’s population is <25 years. The young Africans can be seen on the streets of Nairobi, Accra, and Johannesburg, swiping left and right, using this readily available digital technology for entertainment, education, and learning. Often, and unsurprisingly, this pursuit for knowledge is centered around sex. This phenomenon has though had a less impressive impact on African girls and young women, who continue to be trapped by taboos and restrictive gender and social norms, unable to access accurate sexual and reproductive health and rights information online. The Mobile Gender Gap means only two out of three women in Africa own a mobile phone, and only a third use mobile data regularly. Retrogressive cultural practices and patriarchal norms though are endemic including early marriage, female genital cutting, sexual cleansing, and wife inheritance, exposing them to innumerable risks. STIs, HIV, gender-based sexual violence and teenage pregnancies are commonplace; and complications from pregnancy and childbirth complications remain the leading cause of death among girls aged 15–19 years globally. Today, as we commemorate the International Day of the Girl Child centered on the ‘Digital Generation’ we want to call attention to the rights’ of the girl child and the unique challenges they face globally. IPPFs Youth Action Movement, a peer-led advocacy platform for young people aged 10-24 years, is showing us how the growing technological space is slowly permitting adolescent girls and young women to access digital devices and seek information about their bodies, menstruation, pregnancy prevention, peer pressure, love, pleasure, relationships, contraception and safe abortion. This became more pronounced during the COVID-19 pandemic, which exacerbated the vulnerabilities of girls and women. In Nigeria, the Planned Parenthood of Nigeria  – began delivering sexual reproductive health services using several digital and online platforms including: Short Message Service (SMS), Facebook, WhatsApp, Instagram, Twitter, Zoom and direct telephone calls. These platforms offered accurate, live interactive information and educational sessions, one-to-one consultations and respective referrals. Young people are additionally reached through the Youth Connect website (https://youthconnect.ppfn.org) and ‘The PPFN e-Health App’ which were both co-designed by young people. In Benin, the Association Béninoise pour la Promotion de la Famille introduced online comprehensive sexuality educations sessions, in response to school closures, based on the IPPF’s Framework for CSE: gender, sexual and reproductive health and HIV, sexual rights and sexual citizenship, pleasure, violence, diversity and relationships. In Togo, the Association Togolaise pour le Bien-Etre Familial launched ‘InfoAdoJeunes’, a multi-functional app that was developed for and by young people, providing critical information about sexual and reproductive health in a fun and engaging manner. The 8 navigation tabs: sexuality education, the menstrual cycle, teleconsultation, web TV, games and quizzes, a chat forum, contraception, and a tab where users can ask an experts questions in real-time. These initiatives are proving to be very successful, and feedback, in particular from the young women and girls, has been very positive! Quick, timely, private, online access to information and consultations around sexual health is fun, convenient, non-judgemental and protects their privacy. A win-win all around! We echo UNFPA: To secure an equal future, girls need equal access to digital tools and information. This is why, on this international day of the Girl Child, IPPF’s renews its commitment and call on governments and support to invest in digital technology to ensure adolescents and young girls in Africa can easily access high-quality, accurate information around their sexual and reproductive health and are empowered to make informed decisions about their bodies and their futures. Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry is the Regional Director of the International Planned Parenthood Federation, Africa Region (IPPFAR) and Monica Mwai is a Youth Intern within the Communications Team. By Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry and Monica Mwai The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is one of the leading providers of quality sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services in Africa and a sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy voice in the region. For more updates on our work, follow IPPF Africa Region on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

YOUTH
news item

| 13 January 2022

Africa Youth Month: Taking Stock of Africa’s Commitments to Young People

It is now slightly more than 15 years since the Assembly of the Heads of States of the African Union adopted the Africa Youth Charter in Banjul, The Gambia. Although this Charter provides a strategic framework towards consolidating an approach for the enforcement of meaningful youth involvement in Africa's development agenda, the ideals of this Charter are yet to be realized by young people in their diversities.  Indeed, Africa's development agenda must be linked to the health and well-being of its young people. The United Nations World Population Prospects has documented an incremental growth in young people between the ages of 15 – 24 in Africa since 1952 and this growth has continued to escalate throughout the years. The report also projects that by 2030, over half of the countries in Africa will have more than a 40 per cent increase in the number of young people. These figures demonstrate the need for more meaningful engagement of young people who will be the driving force behind the continent's development agenda.  The sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) of young people in Africa is an agenda that requires a thorough reflection and a particular prioritization by all stakeholders. Young people's sexual and reproductive health needs are most often overlooked due to a myriad of factors, including customs and taboos which impede their access to contraceptives, parental or spousal consent legislations, Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) services that are inadequate or ill-adapted to cater to the diversity of needs of young people. In addition, adolescents and young people lack information on menstrual hygiene, different types of STIs, contraception, prevention of sexual violence, among other topics. Yet this information is vital in enabling them to make informed decisions and equiping them with skills they need to fully enjoy their SRHR. This problematic situation has been worsened by the COVID-19 pandemic, which has exacerbated the vulnerability of young people, with many exposed to sexual and gender-based violence, sexual exploitation, and as well as the closure of clinics and other emergency support services. As many school closed, adolescent girls and young women have been particularly affected and teenage pregnancies have risen as a result of sexual violence and a lack of information on SRH education.     Consequently, this year, as the African Union dedicates the month of November to celebrate Africa’s Youth under the theme " Defining the Future Today: Youth-Led Solutions for Building the Africa We Want”, it is essential that the continent reflects and acts on its commitment towards young people as highlighted in its development agenda 2063 and specifically in the Africa Youth Charter. Young people in Africa are not vulnerable, but they are made vulnerable when they are not involved, heard, engaged, allowed to lead, able to share their ideas of where they want to see the continent in the following years and provided with the knowledge and information necessary to make their own choices and to determine their destiny, particularly concerning their sexual and reproductive health and rights.    Africa is not short of young people who can lead, provide the change we want, and support advancing Africa's development agenda. In Ghana, the Youth Action Movement (YAM), a nationwide network of young people leading and promoting young people's SRHR, has defined itself as a movement by and for Ghanaian youth. The movement’s advocacy on SRHR information and services and young people has led to an increase in young people taking leadership positions, campaigning and  engaging the government on sexual and reproductive health. The YAM has advocated for a positive change in access to youth friendly services at the community level. This has led to an increase in the number of clinics providing youth-friendly SRHR services in Ghana. The movement has also complemented government efforts by providing SRHR information and services to the general population, particularly adolescents, women, men and vulnerable groups, including persons living with a disability. The YAM is also actively involved in linking young people to services through the outreach programme organized by the Planned Parenthood Association of Ghana programme entitled "YENKASA", meaning ‘let's talk’ in local Twi language. Since its establishment in 2020, the contact center has responded to the SRHR needs and challenges of thousands of young people in Ghana.   The youth in Africa continue to demonstrate that they are capable and ready to be entrusted drivers and partners in Africa’s development agenda, including in the field of SRHR. It is now for Africa’s leaders and institutions to give them the trust and the space that they have strived for and earned.   Anita Nyanjong is the Global Lead, Youth at International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF).  Claudia Lawson is the Youth Action Movement (YAM) President, Ghana.

YOUTH
news_item

| 13 January 2022

Africa Youth Month: Taking Stock of Africa’s Commitments to Young People

It is now slightly more than 15 years since the Assembly of the Heads of States of the African Union adopted the Africa Youth Charter in Banjul, The Gambia. Although this Charter provides a strategic framework towards consolidating an approach for the enforcement of meaningful youth involvement in Africa's development agenda, the ideals of this Charter are yet to be realized by young people in their diversities.  Indeed, Africa's development agenda must be linked to the health and well-being of its young people. The United Nations World Population Prospects has documented an incremental growth in young people between the ages of 15 – 24 in Africa since 1952 and this growth has continued to escalate throughout the years. The report also projects that by 2030, over half of the countries in Africa will have more than a 40 per cent increase in the number of young people. These figures demonstrate the need for more meaningful engagement of young people who will be the driving force behind the continent's development agenda.  The sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) of young people in Africa is an agenda that requires a thorough reflection and a particular prioritization by all stakeholders. Young people's sexual and reproductive health needs are most often overlooked due to a myriad of factors, including customs and taboos which impede their access to contraceptives, parental or spousal consent legislations, Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) services that are inadequate or ill-adapted to cater to the diversity of needs of young people. In addition, adolescents and young people lack information on menstrual hygiene, different types of STIs, contraception, prevention of sexual violence, among other topics. Yet this information is vital in enabling them to make informed decisions and equiping them with skills they need to fully enjoy their SRHR. This problematic situation has been worsened by the COVID-19 pandemic, which has exacerbated the vulnerability of young people, with many exposed to sexual and gender-based violence, sexual exploitation, and as well as the closure of clinics and other emergency support services. As many school closed, adolescent girls and young women have been particularly affected and teenage pregnancies have risen as a result of sexual violence and a lack of information on SRH education.     Consequently, this year, as the African Union dedicates the month of November to celebrate Africa’s Youth under the theme " Defining the Future Today: Youth-Led Solutions for Building the Africa We Want”, it is essential that the continent reflects and acts on its commitment towards young people as highlighted in its development agenda 2063 and specifically in the Africa Youth Charter. Young people in Africa are not vulnerable, but they are made vulnerable when they are not involved, heard, engaged, allowed to lead, able to share their ideas of where they want to see the continent in the following years and provided with the knowledge and information necessary to make their own choices and to determine their destiny, particularly concerning their sexual and reproductive health and rights.    Africa is not short of young people who can lead, provide the change we want, and support advancing Africa's development agenda. In Ghana, the Youth Action Movement (YAM), a nationwide network of young people leading and promoting young people's SRHR, has defined itself as a movement by and for Ghanaian youth. The movement’s advocacy on SRHR information and services and young people has led to an increase in young people taking leadership positions, campaigning and  engaging the government on sexual and reproductive health. The YAM has advocated for a positive change in access to youth friendly services at the community level. This has led to an increase in the number of clinics providing youth-friendly SRHR services in Ghana. The movement has also complemented government efforts by providing SRHR information and services to the general population, particularly adolescents, women, men and vulnerable groups, including persons living with a disability. The YAM is also actively involved in linking young people to services through the outreach programme organized by the Planned Parenthood Association of Ghana programme entitled "YENKASA", meaning ‘let's talk’ in local Twi language. Since its establishment in 2020, the contact center has responded to the SRHR needs and challenges of thousands of young people in Ghana.   The youth in Africa continue to demonstrate that they are capable and ready to be entrusted drivers and partners in Africa’s development agenda, including in the field of SRHR. It is now for Africa’s leaders and institutions to give them the trust and the space that they have strived for and earned.   Anita Nyanjong is the Global Lead, Youth at International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF).  Claudia Lawson is the Youth Action Movement (YAM) President, Ghana.

NIGER
news item

| 13 January 2022

Sommet des filles africaines 2021: l’IPPF réaffirme son engagement dans la lutte contre toute forme de violence à l'égard des femmes et des filles.

La Directrice régionale de la Fédération Internationale pour la Planification Familiale (IPPF) Afrique a activement pris part au au Sommet des filles Africaines à Niamey, au Niger, du 16 au 18 Novembre 2021.  Organisé par la Commission de l’Union Africaine, le Sommet des filles africaines vise à accélérer la réalisation de leurs droits, notamment l’élimination des pratiques néfastes - dont la mutilation génitale féminine, le mariage précoce ou encore le bandages des seins - mais aussi leurs droits à l’éducation et à la santé sexuelle et reproductive. Il s’agit du troisième sommet sur ce thème, la première édition s’étant tenue à Lusaka en Zambie du 26 au 27 Novembre 2015 et le 2ème sommet à Accra au Ghana du 21 au 24 Novembre 2018. Durant la cérémonie d’ouverture, la représentante de l’Envoyée spéciale du Secrétaire Général des Nations Unies sur les questions de violences contre les enfants, Mme Najat Maalla M’Jid, a partagé un message fort : « nous devons garder à l’esprit que les enfants et les jeunes d’Afrique représentent un capital, constituent la source la plus riche d’Afrique, avec une population qui ne cesse d'accroître et qui devrait atteindre 830 millions d’ici 2050». Dans son allocution, le Chef d’Etat du Niger, Mohamed Bazoum a, quant à lui, affirmé que la thématique du sommet confirme « l’engagement des pays africains à œuvrer solidairement pour le développement humain sur le continent en s’appuyant en particulier sur les femmes et les jeunes ». Selon lui, « Nous avons donc, à travers cette rencontre, l’occasion d’analyser, de suivre et de mieux orienter les actions de nos Etats en matière de protection des droits humains des filles qui constituent une frange importante de la population de nos pays ». L’IPPF a pour sa part marqué sa participation à travers l’intervention de la Directrice régionale pour l’Afrique, Mme Marie-Evelyne Pétrus-Barry lors de deux panels, consacrés respectivement aux thèmes: "L’impact de la COVID-19 sur les femmes et les filles: une réponse intégrée" et "Les jeunes s'engagent auprès des États membres pour mettre fin aux pratiques néfastes". Lors de ces échanges, la directrice régionale a réaffirmé « l’engagement de l’IPPF à poursuivre la lutte contre toute forme de violence à l'égard des femmes et des filles, de protéger leurs droits et de garantir la fourniture et l'accès aux services et aux informations nécessaires à la protection de leur santé et de leur bien-être ».  Elle a tenu a souligner l’impact dévastateur des pratiques néfastes sur la santé sexuelle et reproductive des femmes et des filles, ainsi que sur leur santé mentale et psychosociale: “Les mutilations génitales féminines et les mariages d'enfants sont tous deux liés à des taux élevés de mortalité maternelle et à un faible recours à la planification familiale amenant à des grossesses non désirées. Ils privent les femmes de la possibilité d'être éduquées, de devenir des êtres imaginatifs, novateurs et créatifs, de s'ouvrir à de nouvelles possibilités et de profiter, elles et leurs familles, de tous les avantages qu'apporte un emploi décent”.  Elle a également relevé le travail abattu par ses associations membres en matière d’innovation et de capacité de résilience face aux défis de la COVID-19 . « Elles ont, entre autres, développé simultanément la télémédecine, le porte-à-porte et leurs cliniques mobiles pour répondre aux besoins des femmes confinées en matière de SSR, numérisé l'éducation sexuelle pour les jeunes privés d’école, etc. »  Elle a enfin tenu à célébrer l’action des jeunes et à les remercier pour leurs actions en faveur des droits sexuels et reproductifs sur le continent: “Merci jeunes femmes et jeunes hommes, merci pour tout ce que vous faites aujourd’hui, et pour les nombreuses choses que vous allez encore accomplir. Je vous adresse ma grande admiration et je pense que je parle au nom de nombreuses personnes de mon âge lorsque je dis que nous vous admirons et que nous sommes prêts à recevoir votre enseignement”.  Il est du devoir de l’IPPF d’appuyer les jeunes, notamment les jeunes femmes et filles, et de leur apporter tout le soutien dont ils ont besoin pour concrétiser et mettre en action leurs engagements collectifs en faveur des droits sexuels et reproductifs. L’IPPF est et restera à leurs côtés. 

NIGER
news_item

| 18 November 2021

Sommet des filles africaines 2021: l’IPPF réaffirme son engagement dans la lutte contre toute forme de violence à l'égard des femmes et des filles.

La Directrice régionale de la Fédération Internationale pour la Planification Familiale (IPPF) Afrique a activement pris part au au Sommet des filles Africaines à Niamey, au Niger, du 16 au 18 Novembre 2021.  Organisé par la Commission de l’Union Africaine, le Sommet des filles africaines vise à accélérer la réalisation de leurs droits, notamment l’élimination des pratiques néfastes - dont la mutilation génitale féminine, le mariage précoce ou encore le bandages des seins - mais aussi leurs droits à l’éducation et à la santé sexuelle et reproductive. Il s’agit du troisième sommet sur ce thème, la première édition s’étant tenue à Lusaka en Zambie du 26 au 27 Novembre 2015 et le 2ème sommet à Accra au Ghana du 21 au 24 Novembre 2018. Durant la cérémonie d’ouverture, la représentante de l’Envoyée spéciale du Secrétaire Général des Nations Unies sur les questions de violences contre les enfants, Mme Najat Maalla M’Jid, a partagé un message fort : « nous devons garder à l’esprit que les enfants et les jeunes d’Afrique représentent un capital, constituent la source la plus riche d’Afrique, avec une population qui ne cesse d'accroître et qui devrait atteindre 830 millions d’ici 2050». Dans son allocution, le Chef d’Etat du Niger, Mohamed Bazoum a, quant à lui, affirmé que la thématique du sommet confirme « l’engagement des pays africains à œuvrer solidairement pour le développement humain sur le continent en s’appuyant en particulier sur les femmes et les jeunes ». Selon lui, « Nous avons donc, à travers cette rencontre, l’occasion d’analyser, de suivre et de mieux orienter les actions de nos Etats en matière de protection des droits humains des filles qui constituent une frange importante de la population de nos pays ». L’IPPF a pour sa part marqué sa participation à travers l’intervention de la Directrice régionale pour l’Afrique, Mme Marie-Evelyne Pétrus-Barry lors de deux panels, consacrés respectivement aux thèmes: "L’impact de la COVID-19 sur les femmes et les filles: une réponse intégrée" et "Les jeunes s'engagent auprès des États membres pour mettre fin aux pratiques néfastes". Lors de ces échanges, la directrice régionale a réaffirmé « l’engagement de l’IPPF à poursuivre la lutte contre toute forme de violence à l'égard des femmes et des filles, de protéger leurs droits et de garantir la fourniture et l'accès aux services et aux informations nécessaires à la protection de leur santé et de leur bien-être ».  Elle a tenu a souligner l’impact dévastateur des pratiques néfastes sur la santé sexuelle et reproductive des femmes et des filles, ainsi que sur leur santé mentale et psychosociale: “Les mutilations génitales féminines et les mariages d'enfants sont tous deux liés à des taux élevés de mortalité maternelle et à un faible recours à la planification familiale amenant à des grossesses non désirées. Ils privent les femmes de la possibilité d'être éduquées, de devenir des êtres imaginatifs, novateurs et créatifs, de s'ouvrir à de nouvelles possibilités et de profiter, elles et leurs familles, de tous les avantages qu'apporte un emploi décent”.  Elle a également relevé le travail abattu par ses associations membres en matière d’innovation et de capacité de résilience face aux défis de la COVID-19 . « Elles ont, entre autres, développé simultanément la télémédecine, le porte-à-porte et leurs cliniques mobiles pour répondre aux besoins des femmes confinées en matière de SSR, numérisé l'éducation sexuelle pour les jeunes privés d’école, etc. »  Elle a enfin tenu à célébrer l’action des jeunes et à les remercier pour leurs actions en faveur des droits sexuels et reproductifs sur le continent: “Merci jeunes femmes et jeunes hommes, merci pour tout ce que vous faites aujourd’hui, et pour les nombreuses choses que vous allez encore accomplir. Je vous adresse ma grande admiration et je pense que je parle au nom de nombreuses personnes de mon âge lorsque je dis que nous vous admirons et que nous sommes prêts à recevoir votre enseignement”.  Il est du devoir de l’IPPF d’appuyer les jeunes, notamment les jeunes femmes et filles, et de leur apporter tout le soutien dont ils ont besoin pour concrétiser et mettre en action leurs engagements collectifs en faveur des droits sexuels et reproductifs. L’IPPF est et restera à leurs côtés. 

IPPF EN CI
news item

| 13 January 2022

Ancrage de l’IPPF en l’Afrique de l’Ouest et du Centre : les autorités ivoiriennes donnent leur accord pour l’ouverture d’un bureau sous régional de l’IPPF en Côte d’Ivoire

Abidjan le 10 novembre 2021 – Du 02 au 10 novembre 2021, une mission de haut niveau du bureau régional Afrique de la Fédération Internationale pour la Planification Familiale (IPPF) a séjourné en Côte d’Ivoire. Conduite par sa directrice régionale, Mme Marie-Evelyne Pétrus-Barry, l’objectif principal de la mission était de rencontrer les autorités ivoiriennes et d’aborder la question du projet d’ouverture d’un bureau sous-régional pour l'Afrique de l'Ouest et du centre à Abidjan. En ouvrant ce nouveau bureau, l’IPPF ambitionne de mieux servir ses associations membres, notamment celles des pays francophones d'Afrique de l'Ouest et du Centre, et de répondre à la volonté croissante des bailleurs de fonds de financer des projets et programmes dans cette région. Le Bureau régional de l’IPPF, basé à Nairobi (Kenya), est une organisation internationale de droits humains centrée sur la planification familiale et la santé de la reproduction. Elle est présente dans 39 pays de la région de l’Afrique subsaharienne, dont la Côte d’Ivoire, par le biais d’associations membres opérant localement. Elle représente le plus grand réseau d’associations dédiées aux droits des femmes et de la planification familiale en Afrique. En Côte d’Ivoire, l’Association Ivoirienne pour le Bien-Être Familial (AIBEF) est l’association membre de l’IPPF. En compagnie des responsables de l’AIBEF, la délégation de l’IPPF a rencontré successivement le Ministre Délégué auprès du Ministre d’État, Ministre des Affaires Etrangères, de l’Intégration Africaine et de la Diaspora; M. Alcide DJEDJE ; la Ministre de la Solidarité et de la Lutte contre la pauvreté, Mme Myss Belmonde DOGO ; la Ministre de la Femme, de la Famille et de l’Enfant, Mme Nassénéba TOURÉ ; la Ministre d’État, ministre des Affaires étrangères, de l’Intégration Africaine et de la Diaspora, Mme Kandia KAMISSOKO CAMARA et enfin, le Premier Ministre, Chef du Gouvernement, M. Patrick Jérôme ACHI. Les échanges ont permis à la délégation de présenter le mandat de l’IPPF, ses résultats en Afrique et de solliciter formellement un accord de siège pour le futur bureau sous régional de l’IPPF. Les officiels ivoiriens ont salué le travail de l’IPPF en matière de santé sexuelle et reproductive et exprimé leur enthousiasme à accueillir le nouveau bureau de l’organisation dans le pays. Un accord de principe a été donné par la Ministre d’État, ministre des Affaires étrangères, de l’Intégration Africaine et de la Diaspora, Mme Kandia KAMISSOKO CAMARA et le Premier Ministre, Chef du Gouvernement, M. Patrick Jérôme ACHI en attendant que les différentes équipes s’attellent à la formalisation des étapes administratives d’installation du nouveau bureau.

IPPF EN CI
news_item

| 11 November 2021

Ancrage de l’IPPF en l’Afrique de l’Ouest et du Centre : les autorités ivoiriennes donnent leur accord pour l’ouverture d’un bureau sous régional de l’IPPF en Côte d’Ivoire

Abidjan le 10 novembre 2021 – Du 02 au 10 novembre 2021, une mission de haut niveau du bureau régional Afrique de la Fédération Internationale pour la Planification Familiale (IPPF) a séjourné en Côte d’Ivoire. Conduite par sa directrice régionale, Mme Marie-Evelyne Pétrus-Barry, l’objectif principal de la mission était de rencontrer les autorités ivoiriennes et d’aborder la question du projet d’ouverture d’un bureau sous-régional pour l'Afrique de l'Ouest et du centre à Abidjan. En ouvrant ce nouveau bureau, l’IPPF ambitionne de mieux servir ses associations membres, notamment celles des pays francophones d'Afrique de l'Ouest et du Centre, et de répondre à la volonté croissante des bailleurs de fonds de financer des projets et programmes dans cette région. Le Bureau régional de l’IPPF, basé à Nairobi (Kenya), est une organisation internationale de droits humains centrée sur la planification familiale et la santé de la reproduction. Elle est présente dans 39 pays de la région de l’Afrique subsaharienne, dont la Côte d’Ivoire, par le biais d’associations membres opérant localement. Elle représente le plus grand réseau d’associations dédiées aux droits des femmes et de la planification familiale en Afrique. En Côte d’Ivoire, l’Association Ivoirienne pour le Bien-Être Familial (AIBEF) est l’association membre de l’IPPF. En compagnie des responsables de l’AIBEF, la délégation de l’IPPF a rencontré successivement le Ministre Délégué auprès du Ministre d’État, Ministre des Affaires Etrangères, de l’Intégration Africaine et de la Diaspora; M. Alcide DJEDJE ; la Ministre de la Solidarité et de la Lutte contre la pauvreté, Mme Myss Belmonde DOGO ; la Ministre de la Femme, de la Famille et de l’Enfant, Mme Nassénéba TOURÉ ; la Ministre d’État, ministre des Affaires étrangères, de l’Intégration Africaine et de la Diaspora, Mme Kandia KAMISSOKO CAMARA et enfin, le Premier Ministre, Chef du Gouvernement, M. Patrick Jérôme ACHI. Les échanges ont permis à la délégation de présenter le mandat de l’IPPF, ses résultats en Afrique et de solliciter formellement un accord de siège pour le futur bureau sous régional de l’IPPF. Les officiels ivoiriens ont salué le travail de l’IPPF en matière de santé sexuelle et reproductive et exprimé leur enthousiasme à accueillir le nouveau bureau de l’organisation dans le pays. Un accord de principe a été donné par la Ministre d’État, ministre des Affaires étrangères, de l’Intégration Africaine et de la Diaspora, Mme Kandia KAMISSOKO CAMARA et le Premier Ministre, Chef du Gouvernement, M. Patrick Jérôme ACHI en attendant que les différentes équipes s’attellent à la formalisation des étapes administratives d’installation du nouveau bureau.

YOUTH
news item

| 13 January 2022

Mois de la jeunesse africaine : Faisons le point sur les engagements de l'Afrique envers les jeunes !

Cela fait maintenant un peu plus de 15 ans que l'Assemblée des chefs d'État de l'Union africaine a adopté la Charte africaine de la jeunesse à Banjul, en Gambie. Bien que cette Charte fournisse un cadre stratégique visant à renforcer de manière significative la participation des jeunes dans l'agenda de développement de l'Afrique, les idéaux de cette Charte doivent encore être réalisés par les jeunes, dans toute leur diversité. En effet, le programme de développement de l'Afrique doit être lié à la santé et au bien-être de ses jeunes. Le rapport des Nations unies sur les projections démographiques mondiales fait état d'une augmentation progressive du nombre de jeunes âgés de 15 à 24 ans en Afrique depuis 1952, et cette augmentation n'a cessé de croître au fil des ans. Le rapport prévoit également que d'ici 2030, plus de la moitié des pays d'Afrique connaîtront une augmentation de plus de 40 % du nombre de jeunes. Ces chiffres démontrent la nécessité d'un engagement plus significatif des jeunes qui seront la force motrice de l'agenda de développement du continent. La santé et les droits sexuels et reproductifs (SDSR) des jeunes en Afrique sont un sujet qui nécessite une réflexion approfondie et une priorité particulière de la part de toutes les parties prenantes. Les besoins des jeunes en matière de santé sexuelle et reproductive (SSR) sont le plus souvent négligés en raison d'une myriade de facteurs, notamment les coutumes et les tabous qui entravent leur accès aux contraceptifs, les législations sur le consentement parental ou conjugal, les services de SSR qui sont inadéquats ou mal adaptés pour répondre à la diversité des besoins des jeunes. En outre, les adolescents et les jeunes manquent d'informations sur l'hygiène menstruelle, les différents types d'IST, la contraception, la prévention de la violence sexuelle, entre autres sujets. Ces informations sont pourtant essentielles pour leur permettre de prendre des décisions en connaissance de cause et les doter des compétences dont ils ont besoin pour profiter pleinement de leurs DSSR. Cette situation problématique a été aggravée par la pandémie de COVID-19, qui a exacerbé la vulnérabilité des jeunes, nombre d'entre eux étant exposés à la violence sexuelle et sexiste, à l'exploitation sexuelle, ainsi qu'à la fermeture des cliniques et autres services d'aide d'urgence. Avec la fermeture de nombreuses écoles, les adolescentes et les jeunes femmes ont été particulièrement touchées et les grossesses précoces ont augmenté en raison des violences sexuelles et du manque d'informations sur la SSR.  Par conséquent, cette année, alors que l'Union africaine consacre le mois de novembre à la jeunesse africaine sous le thème "Définir l'avenir aujourd'hui: Des solutions menées par les jeunes pour construire l'Afrique que nous voulons", il est essentiel que le continent réfléchisse et agisse en fonction de son engagement envers les jeunes, tel que souligné dans son agenda 2063 et plus particulièrement dans la Charte africaine de la jeunesse. Les jeunes en Afrique ne sont pas vulnérables, mais on les rend vulnérables lorsqu'ils ne sont pas impliqués, entendus, engagés, autorisés à diriger, capables de partager leurs idées sur ce qu'ils veulent voir du continent dans les années à venir et dotés des connaissances et des informations nécessaires pour faire leurs propres choix et déterminer leur destin, notamment en ce qui concerne leur SDSR.  L'Afrique ne manque pas de jeunes capables de diriger, d'apporter le changement que nous souhaitons et de contribuer à faire avancer le programme de développement de l'Afrique. Au Ghana, le Mouvement d’Action des Jeunes (MAJ), un réseau national de jeunes menant et promouvant la SDSR des jeunes, s'est défini comme un mouvement par et pour la jeunesse ghanéenne. Le plaidoyer du mouvement en faveur de l'information et des services de SDSR et des jeunes a conduit à une augmentation du nombre de jeunes occupant des postes de direction, faisant campagne et engageant le gouvernement sur la SSR. Le MAJ a plaidé pour un changement positif dans l'accès aux services adaptés aux jeunes au niveau communautaire. Cela a conduit à une augmentation du nombre de cliniques offrant des services de SSR adaptés aux jeunes au Ghana. Le mouvement a également complété les efforts du gouvernement en fournissant des informations et des services de SDSR à la population générale, en particulier aux adolescents, aux femmes, aux hommes et aux groupes vulnérables, y compris les personnes vivant avec un handicap. Le MAJ participe aussi activement à la mise en relation des jeunes avec les services par le biais du programme de sensibilisation organisé par le programme de l'Association de planification familiale du Ghana, intitulé "YENKASA", qui signifie "parlons" en langue locale Twi. Depuis sa création en 2020, le centre de contact a répondu aux besoins et aux défis en matière de SDSR de milliers de jeunes au Ghana. Les jeunes d'Afrique continuent de démontrer qu'ils sont capables et prêts à être les moteurs et les partenaires du programme de développement de l'Afrique, y compris dans le domaine de la SDSR. Il appartient maintenant aux dirigeants et aux institutions de l'Afrique de leur accorder la confiance et l'espace qu'ils ont recherchés et mérités. Anita Nyanjong, Lead Global, Jeunes de la Fédération Internationale pour la Planification Familiale, bureau Afrique (IPPFAR) Claudia Lawson, Présidente du Mouvement d’Action des Jeunes du Ghana

YOUTH
news_item

| 01 November 2021

Mois de la jeunesse africaine : Faisons le point sur les engagements de l'Afrique envers les jeunes !

Cela fait maintenant un peu plus de 15 ans que l'Assemblée des chefs d'État de l'Union africaine a adopté la Charte africaine de la jeunesse à Banjul, en Gambie. Bien que cette Charte fournisse un cadre stratégique visant à renforcer de manière significative la participation des jeunes dans l'agenda de développement de l'Afrique, les idéaux de cette Charte doivent encore être réalisés par les jeunes, dans toute leur diversité. En effet, le programme de développement de l'Afrique doit être lié à la santé et au bien-être de ses jeunes. Le rapport des Nations unies sur les projections démographiques mondiales fait état d'une augmentation progressive du nombre de jeunes âgés de 15 à 24 ans en Afrique depuis 1952, et cette augmentation n'a cessé de croître au fil des ans. Le rapport prévoit également que d'ici 2030, plus de la moitié des pays d'Afrique connaîtront une augmentation de plus de 40 % du nombre de jeunes. Ces chiffres démontrent la nécessité d'un engagement plus significatif des jeunes qui seront la force motrice de l'agenda de développement du continent. La santé et les droits sexuels et reproductifs (SDSR) des jeunes en Afrique sont un sujet qui nécessite une réflexion approfondie et une priorité particulière de la part de toutes les parties prenantes. Les besoins des jeunes en matière de santé sexuelle et reproductive (SSR) sont le plus souvent négligés en raison d'une myriade de facteurs, notamment les coutumes et les tabous qui entravent leur accès aux contraceptifs, les législations sur le consentement parental ou conjugal, les services de SSR qui sont inadéquats ou mal adaptés pour répondre à la diversité des besoins des jeunes. En outre, les adolescents et les jeunes manquent d'informations sur l'hygiène menstruelle, les différents types d'IST, la contraception, la prévention de la violence sexuelle, entre autres sujets. Ces informations sont pourtant essentielles pour leur permettre de prendre des décisions en connaissance de cause et les doter des compétences dont ils ont besoin pour profiter pleinement de leurs DSSR. Cette situation problématique a été aggravée par la pandémie de COVID-19, qui a exacerbé la vulnérabilité des jeunes, nombre d'entre eux étant exposés à la violence sexuelle et sexiste, à l'exploitation sexuelle, ainsi qu'à la fermeture des cliniques et autres services d'aide d'urgence. Avec la fermeture de nombreuses écoles, les adolescentes et les jeunes femmes ont été particulièrement touchées et les grossesses précoces ont augmenté en raison des violences sexuelles et du manque d'informations sur la SSR.  Par conséquent, cette année, alors que l'Union africaine consacre le mois de novembre à la jeunesse africaine sous le thème "Définir l'avenir aujourd'hui: Des solutions menées par les jeunes pour construire l'Afrique que nous voulons", il est essentiel que le continent réfléchisse et agisse en fonction de son engagement envers les jeunes, tel que souligné dans son agenda 2063 et plus particulièrement dans la Charte africaine de la jeunesse. Les jeunes en Afrique ne sont pas vulnérables, mais on les rend vulnérables lorsqu'ils ne sont pas impliqués, entendus, engagés, autorisés à diriger, capables de partager leurs idées sur ce qu'ils veulent voir du continent dans les années à venir et dotés des connaissances et des informations nécessaires pour faire leurs propres choix et déterminer leur destin, notamment en ce qui concerne leur SDSR.  L'Afrique ne manque pas de jeunes capables de diriger, d'apporter le changement que nous souhaitons et de contribuer à faire avancer le programme de développement de l'Afrique. Au Ghana, le Mouvement d’Action des Jeunes (MAJ), un réseau national de jeunes menant et promouvant la SDSR des jeunes, s'est défini comme un mouvement par et pour la jeunesse ghanéenne. Le plaidoyer du mouvement en faveur de l'information et des services de SDSR et des jeunes a conduit à une augmentation du nombre de jeunes occupant des postes de direction, faisant campagne et engageant le gouvernement sur la SSR. Le MAJ a plaidé pour un changement positif dans l'accès aux services adaptés aux jeunes au niveau communautaire. Cela a conduit à une augmentation du nombre de cliniques offrant des services de SSR adaptés aux jeunes au Ghana. Le mouvement a également complété les efforts du gouvernement en fournissant des informations et des services de SDSR à la population générale, en particulier aux adolescents, aux femmes, aux hommes et aux groupes vulnérables, y compris les personnes vivant avec un handicap. Le MAJ participe aussi activement à la mise en relation des jeunes avec les services par le biais du programme de sensibilisation organisé par le programme de l'Association de planification familiale du Ghana, intitulé "YENKASA", qui signifie "parlons" en langue locale Twi. Depuis sa création en 2020, le centre de contact a répondu aux besoins et aux défis en matière de SDSR de milliers de jeunes au Ghana. Les jeunes d'Afrique continuent de démontrer qu'ils sont capables et prêts à être les moteurs et les partenaires du programme de développement de l'Afrique, y compris dans le domaine de la SDSR. Il appartient maintenant aux dirigeants et aux institutions de l'Afrique de leur accorder la confiance et l'espace qu'ils ont recherchés et mérités. Anita Nyanjong, Lead Global, Jeunes de la Fédération Internationale pour la Planification Familiale, bureau Afrique (IPPFAR) Claudia Lawson, Présidente du Mouvement d’Action des Jeunes du Ghana

Uganda
news item

| 13 January 2022

Putting All Women at the Centre of our Work, no Matter Where they Live

More than half of Africa’s women live in rural areas. These women and girls, though diverse in their identities and situations, face similar barriers in accessing critical and timely sexual and reproductive health information, services and commodities. They often live at great distances from health facilities, which often turn into perilous and difficult journeys; the services are often inadequate and costly, medical staff are poorly trained or often just absent; services provided lack confidentiality; women are faced with long waiting hours, work and family obligations and the constant fear of stigmatization and discrimination. The list is truly endless. Additionally, those that may need to access health services lack awareness and knowledge of when and where to seek it. Comprehensive Sexuality Education (CSE) is conspicuously absent from school curriculums, and young girls are often unaware of concepts as basic as menstrual hygiene. Rural women and girls, more so that their urban counterparts, also lack knowledge about contraception and safe maternal health practices. They live in largely patriarchal societies, they cannot make independence choices and lack bodily autonomy. They lack choice as to when to have sex, when to have children, whether and if they can use contraception. Not surprisingly, there are up to three times more pregnancies among teenage girls in rural and indigenous areas than in urban populations. This is all the more concerning when complications from pregnancy and childbirth are the leading cause of death among girls aged 15–19 years globally. Women in rural areas also have lower access to safe abortions, given that few healthcare providers are able or willing to provide these services, even where safe abortion is an option. This, coupled with a lack of accurate knowledge of safe abortion and a strong fear of stigmatisation, means many women resort to seeking unsafe abortion services despite knowing about their risks. In Africa, 99% of abortions are unsafe, resulting in one maternal death per 150 cases.   IPPF Africa Regional office works with Member Associations across Africa to deliver critical sexual and reproductive health services through a strong network of clinics, often located in very remote rural areas and many times the only health structure present. These clinics work in coordination with Government health structures, providing most services free-of-cost; and run regular training sessions to ensure medical practitioners have access to up-to-date medical knowledge. They also invest in the health structures of rural government-owned facilities to ensure delivery of high-quality health services. In areas with no health centers, MAs conduct regular mobile health clinics, where they provide integrated reproductive health services to isolated rural populations. Further, models of social franchising, implemented for example by the Family Guidance of Ethiopia (FGAE), have proven to be successful in addressing the needs of many women and girls in remote areas. This kind of model entails a contractual relationship between franchisee and franchiser where the franchisee agrees to produce or market some important SRH products or services in accordance with an overall “Blue Print” devised by the franchiser. To ensure a strong and complete continuum of care, a high number of Community Health Extension Workers (CHEWs) are recruited and trained. They conduct home visits, providing accurate information, basic services, and commodities. Also, with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, new approaches were piloted. The Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia introduced a new initiative teaching women and  adolescent girls’ to self-administer contraceptives, building their skills, knowledge, capacity and confidence to self-manage their contraceptive needs, and reducing their need to access health facilities. All Member Association initiatives prioritize youth-friendly services, which go a long way in ensuring that girls and young women access SRHR information and services and are empowered to make informed decisions, no matter where they live. Through in-and-out-of-school programmes, peer educators under the Youth Action Movement (YAM) provide SRHR information and distribute condoms to young people in rural areas. Through our advocacy efforts at national, regional and global levels, we raise our voices advocating for all women, ensuring that none is left behind. This goes in tandem with SDG 5: achieving gender equality and empowering all women and girls including rural women. We are relentless in holding governments accountable over their commitments to various instruments, including the Maputo Plan of Action (MPoA) and the Abuja Declaration. Through its programmes, IPPFAR is committed to ensuring that all women and girls can fully exercise their reproductive rights. This is why today, on the International Day of Rural Women, we call on all Governments in Africa to invest in access to quality sexual and reproductive health for rural women and girls. For more updates on our work, follow IPPF Africa Region on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.

Uganda
news_item

| 15 October 2021

Putting All Women at the Centre of our Work, no Matter Where they Live

More than half of Africa’s women live in rural areas. These women and girls, though diverse in their identities and situations, face similar barriers in accessing critical and timely sexual and reproductive health information, services and commodities. They often live at great distances from health facilities, which often turn into perilous and difficult journeys; the services are often inadequate and costly, medical staff are poorly trained or often just absent; services provided lack confidentiality; women are faced with long waiting hours, work and family obligations and the constant fear of stigmatization and discrimination. The list is truly endless. Additionally, those that may need to access health services lack awareness and knowledge of when and where to seek it. Comprehensive Sexuality Education (CSE) is conspicuously absent from school curriculums, and young girls are often unaware of concepts as basic as menstrual hygiene. Rural women and girls, more so that their urban counterparts, also lack knowledge about contraception and safe maternal health practices. They live in largely patriarchal societies, they cannot make independence choices and lack bodily autonomy. They lack choice as to when to have sex, when to have children, whether and if they can use contraception. Not surprisingly, there are up to three times more pregnancies among teenage girls in rural and indigenous areas than in urban populations. This is all the more concerning when complications from pregnancy and childbirth are the leading cause of death among girls aged 15–19 years globally. Women in rural areas also have lower access to safe abortions, given that few healthcare providers are able or willing to provide these services, even where safe abortion is an option. This, coupled with a lack of accurate knowledge of safe abortion and a strong fear of stigmatisation, means many women resort to seeking unsafe abortion services despite knowing about their risks. In Africa, 99% of abortions are unsafe, resulting in one maternal death per 150 cases.   IPPF Africa Regional office works with Member Associations across Africa to deliver critical sexual and reproductive health services through a strong network of clinics, often located in very remote rural areas and many times the only health structure present. These clinics work in coordination with Government health structures, providing most services free-of-cost; and run regular training sessions to ensure medical practitioners have access to up-to-date medical knowledge. They also invest in the health structures of rural government-owned facilities to ensure delivery of high-quality health services. In areas with no health centers, MAs conduct regular mobile health clinics, where they provide integrated reproductive health services to isolated rural populations. Further, models of social franchising, implemented for example by the Family Guidance of Ethiopia (FGAE), have proven to be successful in addressing the needs of many women and girls in remote areas. This kind of model entails a contractual relationship between franchisee and franchiser where the franchisee agrees to produce or market some important SRH products or services in accordance with an overall “Blue Print” devised by the franchiser. To ensure a strong and complete continuum of care, a high number of Community Health Extension Workers (CHEWs) are recruited and trained. They conduct home visits, providing accurate information, basic services, and commodities. Also, with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, new approaches were piloted. The Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia introduced a new initiative teaching women and  adolescent girls’ to self-administer contraceptives, building their skills, knowledge, capacity and confidence to self-manage their contraceptive needs, and reducing their need to access health facilities. All Member Association initiatives prioritize youth-friendly services, which go a long way in ensuring that girls and young women access SRHR information and services and are empowered to make informed decisions, no matter where they live. Through in-and-out-of-school programmes, peer educators under the Youth Action Movement (YAM) provide SRHR information and distribute condoms to young people in rural areas. Through our advocacy efforts at national, regional and global levels, we raise our voices advocating for all women, ensuring that none is left behind. This goes in tandem with SDG 5: achieving gender equality and empowering all women and girls including rural women. We are relentless in holding governments accountable over their commitments to various instruments, including the Maputo Plan of Action (MPoA) and the Abuja Declaration. Through its programmes, IPPFAR is committed to ensuring that all women and girls can fully exercise their reproductive rights. This is why today, on the International Day of Rural Women, we call on all Governments in Africa to invest in access to quality sexual and reproductive health for rural women and girls. For more updates on our work, follow IPPF Africa Region on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube.