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IPPF/Tommy Trenchard

Resources

Latest resources from across the federation and our partners

Spotlight

A selection of resources from across the Federation

Hear us roar
Resource

IPPF Africa Region Quarterly Newsletter - Jan to March 2022

29 March 2022

Stanley Ngara
Resource

| 14 January 2022

Meet Kenya’s King of Condoms, Stanley Ngara

1 December 2021, World AIDS Day. Stanley Ngara, from Kenya, is commonly known as the ‘King of Condom’. Stanley spends his days educating people about safe sex practices and distributing condoms. He distributes condoms -for free- to different groups of people among them youth, sex workers, boda boda riders, university students, market traders and even drug users. Stanley is passionate about raising awareness on issues of sexual reproductive health and rights (SRHR), including HIV and AIDS. IPPF Africa Region met Stanley during one of his regular outreach activities in his home area of Kiambu County, located in Kenya’s Central region, and brings you his story. IPPF supports champions like Stanley, who are committed to raising awareness on different SRHR issues in their communities. On this World AIDS Day 2021, we celebrate Stanley and all other SRHR champions who are making significant contributions in the society, more so towards the attainment of the health goals in their countries. See the long version of Stanley's story: Meet Kenya’s Celebrated 'King of Condoms', Stanley Ngara This feature was co-produced by IPPF Africa Region and Darbrun Production Company (Nairobi). See also: “I Wish I Should not Have to Choose Between Condoms and a Meal”, says Kiandutu Slum’s Shoe Fixer

Stanley Ngara
Resource

| 14 January 2022

Meet Kenya’s King of Condoms, Stanley Ngara

1 December 2021, World AIDS Day. Stanley Ngara, from Kenya, is commonly known as the ‘King of Condom’. Stanley spends his days educating people about safe sex practices and distributing condoms. He distributes condoms -for free- to different groups of people among them youth, sex workers, boda boda riders, university students, market traders and even drug users. Stanley is passionate about raising awareness on issues of sexual reproductive health and rights (SRHR), including HIV and AIDS. IPPF Africa Region met Stanley during one of his regular outreach activities in his home area of Kiambu County, located in Kenya’s Central region, and brings you his story. IPPF supports champions like Stanley, who are committed to raising awareness on different SRHR issues in their communities. On this World AIDS Day 2021, we celebrate Stanley and all other SRHR champions who are making significant contributions in the society, more so towards the attainment of the health goals in their countries. See the long version of Stanley's story: Meet Kenya’s Celebrated 'King of Condoms', Stanley Ngara This feature was co-produced by IPPF Africa Region and Darbrun Production Company (Nairobi). See also: “I Wish I Should not Have to Choose Between Condoms and a Meal”, says Kiandutu Slum’s Shoe Fixer

wish
Resource

| 13 January 2022

Stories of change: Women’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Programme (WISH)

In 2018, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) launched the UK Aid funded Women’s Integrated Sexual Health (WISH) programme to improve equitable access to contraceptives and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), prioritising the most underserved women and particularly adolescent girls, the most economically disadvantaged, and marginalised populations in 16 countries across Asia and Africa. Options’ role in the IPPF-led programme has been to work with governments and civil society partners in seven countries in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia to promote increased public investment in SRHR through evidence, advocacy and accountability. COVID-19 has tested the WISH’s adaptive programming model, which took steps to minimise interruptions to routine SRH services during the pandemic and helped built system resilience. These stories of change share lessons learned on how WISH’s focus on developing an enabling environment has contributed to better SRH and family planning outcomes in Bangladesh, Pakistan and Zambia, where the programme’s work has recently been completed, and focus on the themes of intersectionality, resilience and working in partnership. Dowload the document: Stories of change: Women’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Programme (WISH)

wish
Resource

| 13 January 2022

Stories of change: Women’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Programme (WISH)

In 2018, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) launched the UK Aid funded Women’s Integrated Sexual Health (WISH) programme to improve equitable access to contraceptives and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), prioritising the most underserved women and particularly adolescent girls, the most economically disadvantaged, and marginalised populations in 16 countries across Asia and Africa. Options’ role in the IPPF-led programme has been to work with governments and civil society partners in seven countries in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia to promote increased public investment in SRHR through evidence, advocacy and accountability. COVID-19 has tested the WISH’s adaptive programming model, which took steps to minimise interruptions to routine SRH services during the pandemic and helped built system resilience. These stories of change share lessons learned on how WISH’s focus on developing an enabling environment has contributed to better SRH and family planning outcomes in Bangladesh, Pakistan and Zambia, where the programme’s work has recently been completed, and focus on the themes of intersectionality, resilience and working in partnership. Dowload the document: Stories of change: Women’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Programme (WISH)

ABIDJAN
Resource

| 13 January 2022

Visite de la directrice Régionale de l'IPPF Afrique en Côte d'Ivoire

Les temps forts de la mission de haut niveau du bureau régional Afrique de la Fédération internationale pour la planification familiale (IPPF) en Côte d'Ivoire, du 2 au 10 novembre 2021, pour discuter du projet d'ouverture d'un bureau sous-régional pour l'Afrique occidentale et centrale à Abidjan.

ABIDJAN
Resource

| 13 January 2022

Visite de la directrice Régionale de l'IPPF Afrique en Côte d'Ivoire

Les temps forts de la mission de haut niveau du bureau régional Afrique de la Fédération internationale pour la planification familiale (IPPF) en Côte d'Ivoire, du 2 au 10 novembre 2021, pour discuter du projet d'ouverture d'un bureau sous-régional pour l'Afrique occidentale et centrale à Abidjan.

ABIDJAN
Resource

| 13 January 2022

IPPF Africa Region Director's visit to Côte d'Ivoire

Highlights of the high-level mission of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) Africa Regional Office in Côte d'Ivoire, from 2 to 10 November 2021, to discuss the project of opening a sub-regional office for West and Central Africa in Abidjan.

ABIDJAN
Resource

| 13 January 2022

IPPF Africa Region Director's visit to Côte d'Ivoire

Highlights of the high-level mission of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) Africa Regional Office in Côte d'Ivoire, from 2 to 10 November 2021, to discuss the project of opening a sub-regional office for West and Central Africa in Abidjan.

Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting: Times Are Changing
Resource

| 13 January 2022

Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting: Times Are Changing

Female genital cutting or mutilation, also known as FGC or FGM, involves partial or total removal of the external female genitalia, or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons. It is typically performed on girls under 15 years of age although this varies across communities and can sometimes be carried out during the first weeks of life or occasionally in adulthood. Female genital cutting is a serious reproductive health concern and a human rights violation. It has devastating short- and long-term consequences on the lives of women and girls and their communities. Female genital cutting can lead to hemorrhaging, infections, damage to adjoining organs, infertility, complications during pregnancy and childbirth, psychological trauma, and even death. Worldwide, between 100 million and 140 million women have been cut, and 3 million more are at risk each year. Women are subjected to female genital cutting in 28 countries in Africa – this includes Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda in East and Southern Africa. Female genital cutting is a practice that is deeply-rooted in tradition in communities where it is practiced and passed on through generations. It is frequently based on the belief that the practice helps control a girl’s sexuality and ensures her virginity until marriage or helps prepare her for marriage. Female genital cutting is becoming less common, with more than 24,000 communities around the world declaring abandonment of the practice. Locally-led efforts that help recognize the harm of female genital cutting through community discussions are making a difference as more and more families decide not to cut their daughters.

Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting: Times Are Changing
Resource

| 13 January 2022

Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting: Times Are Changing

Female genital cutting or mutilation, also known as FGC or FGM, involves partial or total removal of the external female genitalia, or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons. It is typically performed on girls under 15 years of age although this varies across communities and can sometimes be carried out during the first weeks of life or occasionally in adulthood. Female genital cutting is a serious reproductive health concern and a human rights violation. It has devastating short- and long-term consequences on the lives of women and girls and their communities. Female genital cutting can lead to hemorrhaging, infections, damage to adjoining organs, infertility, complications during pregnancy and childbirth, psychological trauma, and even death. Worldwide, between 100 million and 140 million women have been cut, and 3 million more are at risk each year. Women are subjected to female genital cutting in 28 countries in Africa – this includes Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda in East and Southern Africa. Female genital cutting is a practice that is deeply-rooted in tradition in communities where it is practiced and passed on through generations. It is frequently based on the belief that the practice helps control a girl’s sexuality and ensures her virginity until marriage or helps prepare her for marriage. Female genital cutting is becoming less common, with more than 24,000 communities around the world declaring abandonment of the practice. Locally-led efforts that help recognize the harm of female genital cutting through community discussions are making a difference as more and more families decide not to cut their daughters.

Dr Aproko
Resource

| 13 January 2022

Creative session between Dr Aproko and the Youth Action Movement of Nigeria on SRHR

In order to increase African youth awareness on specific issues related to sexual and reproductive health and rights, IPPFAR engaged the services of Influencer Aproko Dr. for a 1-month digital campaign including the production and dissemination of various video content. This video highlights the creative session between Dr Aproko and the Youth Action Movement of Nigeria on sexual reproductive health and education. The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organization in Africa, and the leading sexual and reproductive health and rights advocacy voice in the region. Headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, the overarching goal of IPPFAR is to increase access to SRHR services to the most vulnerable youth, men and women in sub-Saharan Africa.

Dr Aproko
Resource

| 13 January 2022

Creative session between Dr Aproko and the Youth Action Movement of Nigeria on SRHR

In order to increase African youth awareness on specific issues related to sexual and reproductive health and rights, IPPFAR engaged the services of Influencer Aproko Dr. for a 1-month digital campaign including the production and dissemination of various video content. This video highlights the creative session between Dr Aproko and the Youth Action Movement of Nigeria on sexual reproductive health and education. The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organization in Africa, and the leading sexual and reproductive health and rights advocacy voice in the region. Headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, the overarching goal of IPPFAR is to increase access to SRHR services to the most vulnerable youth, men and women in sub-Saharan Africa.

Stanley Ngara
Resource

| 14 January 2022

Meet Kenya’s King of Condoms, Stanley Ngara

1 December 2021, World AIDS Day. Stanley Ngara, from Kenya, is commonly known as the ‘King of Condom’. Stanley spends his days educating people about safe sex practices and distributing condoms. He distributes condoms -for free- to different groups of people among them youth, sex workers, boda boda riders, university students, market traders and even drug users. Stanley is passionate about raising awareness on issues of sexual reproductive health and rights (SRHR), including HIV and AIDS. IPPF Africa Region met Stanley during one of his regular outreach activities in his home area of Kiambu County, located in Kenya’s Central region, and brings you his story. IPPF supports champions like Stanley, who are committed to raising awareness on different SRHR issues in their communities. On this World AIDS Day 2021, we celebrate Stanley and all other SRHR champions who are making significant contributions in the society, more so towards the attainment of the health goals in their countries. See the long version of Stanley's story: Meet Kenya’s Celebrated 'King of Condoms', Stanley Ngara This feature was co-produced by IPPF Africa Region and Darbrun Production Company (Nairobi). See also: “I Wish I Should not Have to Choose Between Condoms and a Meal”, says Kiandutu Slum’s Shoe Fixer

Stanley Ngara
Resource

| 14 January 2022

Meet Kenya’s King of Condoms, Stanley Ngara

1 December 2021, World AIDS Day. Stanley Ngara, from Kenya, is commonly known as the ‘King of Condom’. Stanley spends his days educating people about safe sex practices and distributing condoms. He distributes condoms -for free- to different groups of people among them youth, sex workers, boda boda riders, university students, market traders and even drug users. Stanley is passionate about raising awareness on issues of sexual reproductive health and rights (SRHR), including HIV and AIDS. IPPF Africa Region met Stanley during one of his regular outreach activities in his home area of Kiambu County, located in Kenya’s Central region, and brings you his story. IPPF supports champions like Stanley, who are committed to raising awareness on different SRHR issues in their communities. On this World AIDS Day 2021, we celebrate Stanley and all other SRHR champions who are making significant contributions in the society, more so towards the attainment of the health goals in their countries. See the long version of Stanley's story: Meet Kenya’s Celebrated 'King of Condoms', Stanley Ngara This feature was co-produced by IPPF Africa Region and Darbrun Production Company (Nairobi). See also: “I Wish I Should not Have to Choose Between Condoms and a Meal”, says Kiandutu Slum’s Shoe Fixer

wish
Resource

| 13 January 2022

Stories of change: Women’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Programme (WISH)

In 2018, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) launched the UK Aid funded Women’s Integrated Sexual Health (WISH) programme to improve equitable access to contraceptives and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), prioritising the most underserved women and particularly adolescent girls, the most economically disadvantaged, and marginalised populations in 16 countries across Asia and Africa. Options’ role in the IPPF-led programme has been to work with governments and civil society partners in seven countries in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia to promote increased public investment in SRHR through evidence, advocacy and accountability. COVID-19 has tested the WISH’s adaptive programming model, which took steps to minimise interruptions to routine SRH services during the pandemic and helped built system resilience. These stories of change share lessons learned on how WISH’s focus on developing an enabling environment has contributed to better SRH and family planning outcomes in Bangladesh, Pakistan and Zambia, where the programme’s work has recently been completed, and focus on the themes of intersectionality, resilience and working in partnership. Dowload the document: Stories of change: Women’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Programme (WISH)

wish
Resource

| 13 January 2022

Stories of change: Women’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Programme (WISH)

In 2018, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) launched the UK Aid funded Women’s Integrated Sexual Health (WISH) programme to improve equitable access to contraceptives and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), prioritising the most underserved women and particularly adolescent girls, the most economically disadvantaged, and marginalised populations in 16 countries across Asia and Africa. Options’ role in the IPPF-led programme has been to work with governments and civil society partners in seven countries in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia to promote increased public investment in SRHR through evidence, advocacy and accountability. COVID-19 has tested the WISH’s adaptive programming model, which took steps to minimise interruptions to routine SRH services during the pandemic and helped built system resilience. These stories of change share lessons learned on how WISH’s focus on developing an enabling environment has contributed to better SRH and family planning outcomes in Bangladesh, Pakistan and Zambia, where the programme’s work has recently been completed, and focus on the themes of intersectionality, resilience and working in partnership. Dowload the document: Stories of change: Women’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Programme (WISH)

ABIDJAN
Resource

| 13 January 2022

Visite de la directrice Régionale de l'IPPF Afrique en Côte d'Ivoire

Les temps forts de la mission de haut niveau du bureau régional Afrique de la Fédération internationale pour la planification familiale (IPPF) en Côte d'Ivoire, du 2 au 10 novembre 2021, pour discuter du projet d'ouverture d'un bureau sous-régional pour l'Afrique occidentale et centrale à Abidjan.

ABIDJAN
Resource

| 13 January 2022

Visite de la directrice Régionale de l'IPPF Afrique en Côte d'Ivoire

Les temps forts de la mission de haut niveau du bureau régional Afrique de la Fédération internationale pour la planification familiale (IPPF) en Côte d'Ivoire, du 2 au 10 novembre 2021, pour discuter du projet d'ouverture d'un bureau sous-régional pour l'Afrique occidentale et centrale à Abidjan.

ABIDJAN
Resource

| 13 January 2022

IPPF Africa Region Director's visit to Côte d'Ivoire

Highlights of the high-level mission of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) Africa Regional Office in Côte d'Ivoire, from 2 to 10 November 2021, to discuss the project of opening a sub-regional office for West and Central Africa in Abidjan.

ABIDJAN
Resource

| 13 January 2022

IPPF Africa Region Director's visit to Côte d'Ivoire

Highlights of the high-level mission of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) Africa Regional Office in Côte d'Ivoire, from 2 to 10 November 2021, to discuss the project of opening a sub-regional office for West and Central Africa in Abidjan.

Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting: Times Are Changing
Resource

| 13 January 2022

Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting: Times Are Changing

Female genital cutting or mutilation, also known as FGC or FGM, involves partial or total removal of the external female genitalia, or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons. It is typically performed on girls under 15 years of age although this varies across communities and can sometimes be carried out during the first weeks of life or occasionally in adulthood. Female genital cutting is a serious reproductive health concern and a human rights violation. It has devastating short- and long-term consequences on the lives of women and girls and their communities. Female genital cutting can lead to hemorrhaging, infections, damage to adjoining organs, infertility, complications during pregnancy and childbirth, psychological trauma, and even death. Worldwide, between 100 million and 140 million women have been cut, and 3 million more are at risk each year. Women are subjected to female genital cutting in 28 countries in Africa – this includes Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda in East and Southern Africa. Female genital cutting is a practice that is deeply-rooted in tradition in communities where it is practiced and passed on through generations. It is frequently based on the belief that the practice helps control a girl’s sexuality and ensures her virginity until marriage or helps prepare her for marriage. Female genital cutting is becoming less common, with more than 24,000 communities around the world declaring abandonment of the practice. Locally-led efforts that help recognize the harm of female genital cutting through community discussions are making a difference as more and more families decide not to cut their daughters.

Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting: Times Are Changing
Resource

| 13 January 2022

Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting: Times Are Changing

Female genital cutting or mutilation, also known as FGC or FGM, involves partial or total removal of the external female genitalia, or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons. It is typically performed on girls under 15 years of age although this varies across communities and can sometimes be carried out during the first weeks of life or occasionally in adulthood. Female genital cutting is a serious reproductive health concern and a human rights violation. It has devastating short- and long-term consequences on the lives of women and girls and their communities. Female genital cutting can lead to hemorrhaging, infections, damage to adjoining organs, infertility, complications during pregnancy and childbirth, psychological trauma, and even death. Worldwide, between 100 million and 140 million women have been cut, and 3 million more are at risk each year. Women are subjected to female genital cutting in 28 countries in Africa – this includes Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda in East and Southern Africa. Female genital cutting is a practice that is deeply-rooted in tradition in communities where it is practiced and passed on through generations. It is frequently based on the belief that the practice helps control a girl’s sexuality and ensures her virginity until marriage or helps prepare her for marriage. Female genital cutting is becoming less common, with more than 24,000 communities around the world declaring abandonment of the practice. Locally-led efforts that help recognize the harm of female genital cutting through community discussions are making a difference as more and more families decide not to cut their daughters.

Dr Aproko
Resource

| 13 January 2022

Creative session between Dr Aproko and the Youth Action Movement of Nigeria on SRHR

In order to increase African youth awareness on specific issues related to sexual and reproductive health and rights, IPPFAR engaged the services of Influencer Aproko Dr. for a 1-month digital campaign including the production and dissemination of various video content. This video highlights the creative session between Dr Aproko and the Youth Action Movement of Nigeria on sexual reproductive health and education. The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organization in Africa, and the leading sexual and reproductive health and rights advocacy voice in the region. Headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, the overarching goal of IPPFAR is to increase access to SRHR services to the most vulnerable youth, men and women in sub-Saharan Africa.

Dr Aproko
Resource

| 13 January 2022

Creative session between Dr Aproko and the Youth Action Movement of Nigeria on SRHR

In order to increase African youth awareness on specific issues related to sexual and reproductive health and rights, IPPFAR engaged the services of Influencer Aproko Dr. for a 1-month digital campaign including the production and dissemination of various video content. This video highlights the creative session between Dr Aproko and the Youth Action Movement of Nigeria on sexual reproductive health and education. The International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Region (IPPFAR) is the leading sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service delivery organization in Africa, and the leading sexual and reproductive health and rights advocacy voice in the region. Headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, the overarching goal of IPPFAR is to increase access to SRHR services to the most vulnerable youth, men and women in sub-Saharan Africa.