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IPPF/Tommy Trenchard

Resources

Latest resources from across the federation and our partners

Spotlight

A selection of resources from across the Federation

IPPF Regions' Achievements in 2023

Africa

Resource

Africa's Health Champions: IPPF Regions' Achievements in 2023

IPPF Africa Region has released its 2023 achievements video highlighting impactful work across the continent this past year. The 2-minute video gives a snapshot of IPPF's support for expanding access to family planning, advancing sexual and reproductive health rights through advocacy, supporting gender, equality, providing comprehensive sexuality education for youth, increasing access to safe abortion care, and eliminating harmful practices.
Reproductive Health Uganda
Resource

| 13 October 2016

Keeping Young Ugandans Healthy

The Access, Services and Knowledge (ASK): what young people want, what young people need’ programme targets young people (10-24 years) including underserved groups, with a specific focus on uptake of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services in the countries of Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, Ghana and Senegal. ASK aims to ensure that young people not only receive direct information on sexual and reproductive health and rights so that they can make independent informed decisions. The ASK programme is a joint effort by 7 organisations: IPPF Rutgers WPF, Simavi, Amref Flying Doctors, Choice, dance4life and Stop Aids Now! Child Helpline International is engaged in the programme as a technical partner.

Reproductive Health Uganda
Resource

| 13 October 2016

Keeping Young Ugandans Healthy

The Access, Services and Knowledge (ASK): what young people want, what young people need’ programme targets young people (10-24 years) including underserved groups, with a specific focus on uptake of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services in the countries of Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, Ghana and Senegal. ASK aims to ensure that young people not only receive direct information on sexual and reproductive health and rights so that they can make independent informed decisions. The ASK programme is a joint effort by 7 organisations: IPPF Rutgers WPF, Simavi, Amref Flying Doctors, Choice, dance4life and Stop Aids Now! Child Helpline International is engaged in the programme as a technical partner.

Monitoring officer with app
Resource

| 13 October 2016

Ensuring people can get the contraception they want

"We capture the data directly into this app. It maps out what the demand will be and ensures that we never run out of those supplies." Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria (PPFN)'s Monitoring and Evaluation Officer, Babatunde, is responsible for ensuring the supply of contraceptives for all the cluster facilities. "My job entails the use of a mobile app built for direct data information capture (DDIC). I created an account for each of the 10 facilities that were under the Clusterplus Model. ClusterPLUS is something of a hybrid. It was built on the foundation of PPFN’s previous work but added new thinking, including ideas developed by IPPF member associations in Kenya and Uganda, who helped PPFN adapt them for Nigeria. At its heart is a simple concept - partnership. The closer you can get to local communities, the better you work with national and local government and more you try to build local ownership, the better. "Before I stock up their store, I audit their supplies and can review their monthly report via the app. I put this into the mobile app as well as the commodities I have supplied them. Every two months, the app forecasts what a particular facility will need based on the contraceptive demand,” says Babatunde. "I provided training on the mobile app for the store keepers at the facilities we worked with. All through the nine months of the Clusterplus Project, no facility ever ran out. This meant family planning methods were always available to those that needed them.” Babatunde has developed a wealth of knowledge about family planning and the many methods available. Clients favoured long-acting methods Implanol and the IUCD.

Monitoring officer with app
Resource

| 13 October 2016

Ensuring people can get the contraception they want

"We capture the data directly into this app. It maps out what the demand will be and ensures that we never run out of those supplies." Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria (PPFN)'s Monitoring and Evaluation Officer, Babatunde, is responsible for ensuring the supply of contraceptives for all the cluster facilities. "My job entails the use of a mobile app built for direct data information capture (DDIC). I created an account for each of the 10 facilities that were under the Clusterplus Model. ClusterPLUS is something of a hybrid. It was built on the foundation of PPFN’s previous work but added new thinking, including ideas developed by IPPF member associations in Kenya and Uganda, who helped PPFN adapt them for Nigeria. At its heart is a simple concept - partnership. The closer you can get to local communities, the better you work with national and local government and more you try to build local ownership, the better. "Before I stock up their store, I audit their supplies and can review their monthly report via the app. I put this into the mobile app as well as the commodities I have supplied them. Every two months, the app forecasts what a particular facility will need based on the contraceptive demand,” says Babatunde. "I provided training on the mobile app for the store keepers at the facilities we worked with. All through the nine months of the Clusterplus Project, no facility ever ran out. This meant family planning methods were always available to those that needed them.” Babatunde has developed a wealth of knowledge about family planning and the many methods available. Clients favoured long-acting methods Implanol and the IUCD.

Planned Parenthood Association of Ghana
Resource

| 05 October 2016

A Bright Future: Lanterns for Women's Empowerment

Women’s empowerment is key to ensuring their health and well-being. A partnership between public, private and civil society found a unique way to address health and gender inequalities in one of the most disadvantageous communities in the Northern regions of Ghana. This pilot project introduced solar lanterns, health and economic interventions to 20 villages. The project was effective because it brought together Japan’s ODA, private sector technology and IPPF’s community-based activities to challenge structural barriers and harmful gender norms. In doing so, we have done more than bring ‘light’ where there was once ‘darkness’. This intervention has transformed the lives of women, their families and their community.

Planned Parenthood Association of Ghana
Resource

| 05 October 2016

A Bright Future: Lanterns for Women's Empowerment

Women’s empowerment is key to ensuring their health and well-being. A partnership between public, private and civil society found a unique way to address health and gender inequalities in one of the most disadvantageous communities in the Northern regions of Ghana. This pilot project introduced solar lanterns, health and economic interventions to 20 villages. The project was effective because it brought together Japan’s ODA, private sector technology and IPPF’s community-based activities to challenge structural barriers and harmful gender norms. In doing so, we have done more than bring ‘light’ where there was once ‘darkness’. This intervention has transformed the lives of women, their families and their community.

Financial Statement 2015 cover
Resource

| 17 June 2016

Financial Statement 2015

IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$126.2 million to US$116.2 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$5.8 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$6.2 million and reduced donations in kind of US$0.6 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$4m with the balance of US$0.9 million decrease in other income and trading activities. The total decrease is split between restricted and unrestricted funds by US$2.3 million and US$7.6 million respectively. With the exception of Norway and Japan, all government (more significantly Australia and Sweden) donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 14% on a like for like basis compared to 2014. Total expenditure has decreased from US$137.5 million to US$131.8 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$84.2 million to US$85.6 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$53.3 million to US$46.2 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$1.9 million) and the use of US$8.9m designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$2.3m); support for resource mobilization at regional and central level (US$1.5 million); campaign and advocacy for UN Liaison office (US$0.9 million); scale up fund for SGBV support to MAs (US$0.5 million); contingency spend on various activities (US$0.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-by-year basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted net operating expenditure of US$13.4 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$2.1 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$15.6 million. After taking into account actuarial gain on the defined benefit pension scheme and investment losses the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$13.6 million. The level of unrestricted income received was approximately US$4 million less than forecast primarily due to the strength of the US dollar versus donor currencies and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$2m million). This resulted in a decrease in general reserves to US$21.9 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$73.3 million.

Financial Statement 2015 cover
Resource

| 17 June 2016

Financial Statement 2015

IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$126.2 million to US$116.2 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$5.8 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$6.2 million and reduced donations in kind of US$0.6 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$4m with the balance of US$0.9 million decrease in other income and trading activities. The total decrease is split between restricted and unrestricted funds by US$2.3 million and US$7.6 million respectively. With the exception of Norway and Japan, all government (more significantly Australia and Sweden) donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 14% on a like for like basis compared to 2014. Total expenditure has decreased from US$137.5 million to US$131.8 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$84.2 million to US$85.6 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$53.3 million to US$46.2 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$1.9 million) and the use of US$8.9m designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$2.3m); support for resource mobilization at regional and central level (US$1.5 million); campaign and advocacy for UN Liaison office (US$0.9 million); scale up fund for SGBV support to MAs (US$0.5 million); contingency spend on various activities (US$0.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-by-year basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted net operating expenditure of US$13.4 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$2.1 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$15.6 million. After taking into account actuarial gain on the defined benefit pension scheme and investment losses the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$13.6 million. The level of unrestricted income received was approximately US$4 million less than forecast primarily due to the strength of the US dollar versus donor currencies and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$2m million). This resulted in a decrease in general reserves to US$21.9 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$73.3 million.

Financial Statement
Resource

| 17 June 2015

Financial Statement 2014

Financial Statements for 2014 Executive Summary IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$136.1 million to US$126.1 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$2.2 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$8.0 million and reduced donations in kind of US$2.2 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$2.9 million. The total decrease is equally split between unrestricted and restricted income at US$5 million each. With the exception of Australia, all government donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 9% on a like for like basis compared to 2013. Total expenditure has risen from US$132.8 million to US$137.6 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$76.8 million to US$84.3 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$56.0 million to US$53.3 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$3.6 million) and the use of designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$1.7 million); provision of support to Member Associations (MAs) to scale up services (US$0.9 million); development of the new strategic framework (US$0.4 million); international advocacy and supporting IPPF Vision 2020 campaign to place sexual reproductive health (SRH) and rights at the centre of the sustainable development agenda (US$0.8 million); and support for resource mobilization at a regional and central level (US$1.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-byyear basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted deficit of US$4.6 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$6.9 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$11.5 million. After taking into account actuarial losses on the defined benefit pension scheme the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$15.1 million. The level of unrestricted income received was as forecast in the 2014 budget and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$6.4 million). This resulted in a small increase in general reserves to US$24.0 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$85.9 million.   "The unrestricted funding that our major donors have provided to us over the long term has enabled the Federation’s Member Associations to build sustainable programmes of delivery and advocacy impacting positively the lives of millions of people."

Financial Statement
Resource

| 17 June 2015

Financial Statement 2014

Financial Statements for 2014 Executive Summary IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$136.1 million to US$126.1 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$2.2 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$8.0 million and reduced donations in kind of US$2.2 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$2.9 million. The total decrease is equally split between unrestricted and restricted income at US$5 million each. With the exception of Australia, all government donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 9% on a like for like basis compared to 2013. Total expenditure has risen from US$132.8 million to US$137.6 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$76.8 million to US$84.3 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$56.0 million to US$53.3 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$3.6 million) and the use of designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$1.7 million); provision of support to Member Associations (MAs) to scale up services (US$0.9 million); development of the new strategic framework (US$0.4 million); international advocacy and supporting IPPF Vision 2020 campaign to place sexual reproductive health (SRH) and rights at the centre of the sustainable development agenda (US$0.8 million); and support for resource mobilization at a regional and central level (US$1.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-byyear basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted deficit of US$4.6 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$6.9 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$11.5 million. After taking into account actuarial losses on the defined benefit pension scheme the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$15.1 million. The level of unrestricted income received was as forecast in the 2014 budget and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$6.4 million). This resulted in a small increase in general reserves to US$24.0 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$85.9 million.   "The unrestricted funding that our major donors have provided to us over the long term has enabled the Federation’s Member Associations to build sustainable programmes of delivery and advocacy impacting positively the lives of millions of people."

Strategic framework 2022-2028
Resource

| 06 May 2015

IPPF's Strategic Framework: 2023-2028

  For 70 years IPPF has championed and delivered quality services, comprehensive information and advocated for just laws so that more people in more places under more circumstances may realize their sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR). Started with an act of international solidarity between activists from just a handful of countries, IPPF has since grown into a broad and diverse community of services providers and advocates that stretches around the Earth. Our very existence manifests just how the demand for dignity in sexual and reproductive health and rights is universal to people the world over. But that world is changing rapidly. Tough challenges must be confronted – the toxic legacies of longstanding racism, sexism and homophobia, for example; the deepening impacts of the climate crisis, violence, and inequalities; the escalating consequences of new technologies, population displacements, and habitat destruction. Wherever such dynamics impact people’s lives, IPPF knows enjoyment of SRHR is impacted too. Whenever people confront humanitarian crises, we know their SRHR are thrust into crisis too. Whoever is subject to prejudice, bigotry, or exclusion, has their access to SRHR also eroded. We know that the worst consequences of those injustices are borne by young people in the poorest of communities, in the toughest of places, facing the fewest opportunities. To be impactful in a world of change, IPPF must change too. That is what Strategy 2028 is all about: changing IPPF so it is well equipped to uphold SRHR for those who are left out, locked out or left behind. Our Strategy 2028 sets out a familiar path but in a new direction over far tougher terrain to that clear destination. We will walk that path shoulder to shoulder with young people, and with individuals and communities bearing the full brunt of stigma and prejudice. At each step, we will defend, protect, and celebrate safety, pleasure and wellbeing in sex and reproduction. At every turn, we will denounce powers and authorities who, through policy, practice, and law, undermine dignity and human rights in those intimate realms. And, as IPPF, we will be accountable for who we are, what we do and how we do it. That is our Strategy 2028. It is with immense pride that the IPPF Board of Trustees shares this strategic itinerary with you. We very much hope you will travel this road with us – in your own realities, communities, and contexts. Let’s do that together. Let’s come together, for sexual and reproductive dignity for all - for each and every one of us, to the exclusion of none of us, in the interests of all of us. Kate Gilmore, Chair, BoT, IPPF   Download the Strategic Framework in English Download the Strategic Framework in French

Strategic framework 2022-2028
Resource

| 06 May 2015

IPPF's Strategic Framework: 2023-2028

  For 70 years IPPF has championed and delivered quality services, comprehensive information and advocated for just laws so that more people in more places under more circumstances may realize their sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR). Started with an act of international solidarity between activists from just a handful of countries, IPPF has since grown into a broad and diverse community of services providers and advocates that stretches around the Earth. Our very existence manifests just how the demand for dignity in sexual and reproductive health and rights is universal to people the world over. But that world is changing rapidly. Tough challenges must be confronted – the toxic legacies of longstanding racism, sexism and homophobia, for example; the deepening impacts of the climate crisis, violence, and inequalities; the escalating consequences of new technologies, population displacements, and habitat destruction. Wherever such dynamics impact people’s lives, IPPF knows enjoyment of SRHR is impacted too. Whenever people confront humanitarian crises, we know their SRHR are thrust into crisis too. Whoever is subject to prejudice, bigotry, or exclusion, has their access to SRHR also eroded. We know that the worst consequences of those injustices are borne by young people in the poorest of communities, in the toughest of places, facing the fewest opportunities. To be impactful in a world of change, IPPF must change too. That is what Strategy 2028 is all about: changing IPPF so it is well equipped to uphold SRHR for those who are left out, locked out or left behind. Our Strategy 2028 sets out a familiar path but in a new direction over far tougher terrain to that clear destination. We will walk that path shoulder to shoulder with young people, and with individuals and communities bearing the full brunt of stigma and prejudice. At each step, we will defend, protect, and celebrate safety, pleasure and wellbeing in sex and reproduction. At every turn, we will denounce powers and authorities who, through policy, practice, and law, undermine dignity and human rights in those intimate realms. And, as IPPF, we will be accountable for who we are, what we do and how we do it. That is our Strategy 2028. It is with immense pride that the IPPF Board of Trustees shares this strategic itinerary with you. We very much hope you will travel this road with us – in your own realities, communities, and contexts. Let’s do that together. Let’s come together, for sexual and reproductive dignity for all - for each and every one of us, to the exclusion of none of us, in the interests of all of us. Kate Gilmore, Chair, BoT, IPPF   Download the Strategic Framework in English Download the Strategic Framework in French

Reproductive Health Uganda
Resource

| 13 October 2016

Keeping Young Ugandans Healthy

The Access, Services and Knowledge (ASK): what young people want, what young people need’ programme targets young people (10-24 years) including underserved groups, with a specific focus on uptake of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services in the countries of Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, Ghana and Senegal. ASK aims to ensure that young people not only receive direct information on sexual and reproductive health and rights so that they can make independent informed decisions. The ASK programme is a joint effort by 7 organisations: IPPF Rutgers WPF, Simavi, Amref Flying Doctors, Choice, dance4life and Stop Aids Now! Child Helpline International is engaged in the programme as a technical partner.

Reproductive Health Uganda
Resource

| 13 October 2016

Keeping Young Ugandans Healthy

The Access, Services and Knowledge (ASK): what young people want, what young people need’ programme targets young people (10-24 years) including underserved groups, with a specific focus on uptake of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services in the countries of Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, Ghana and Senegal. ASK aims to ensure that young people not only receive direct information on sexual and reproductive health and rights so that they can make independent informed decisions. The ASK programme is a joint effort by 7 organisations: IPPF Rutgers WPF, Simavi, Amref Flying Doctors, Choice, dance4life and Stop Aids Now! Child Helpline International is engaged in the programme as a technical partner.

Monitoring officer with app
Resource

| 13 October 2016

Ensuring people can get the contraception they want

"We capture the data directly into this app. It maps out what the demand will be and ensures that we never run out of those supplies." Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria (PPFN)'s Monitoring and Evaluation Officer, Babatunde, is responsible for ensuring the supply of contraceptives for all the cluster facilities. "My job entails the use of a mobile app built for direct data information capture (DDIC). I created an account for each of the 10 facilities that were under the Clusterplus Model. ClusterPLUS is something of a hybrid. It was built on the foundation of PPFN’s previous work but added new thinking, including ideas developed by IPPF member associations in Kenya and Uganda, who helped PPFN adapt them for Nigeria. At its heart is a simple concept - partnership. The closer you can get to local communities, the better you work with national and local government and more you try to build local ownership, the better. "Before I stock up their store, I audit their supplies and can review their monthly report via the app. I put this into the mobile app as well as the commodities I have supplied them. Every two months, the app forecasts what a particular facility will need based on the contraceptive demand,” says Babatunde. "I provided training on the mobile app for the store keepers at the facilities we worked with. All through the nine months of the Clusterplus Project, no facility ever ran out. This meant family planning methods were always available to those that needed them.” Babatunde has developed a wealth of knowledge about family planning and the many methods available. Clients favoured long-acting methods Implanol and the IUCD.

Monitoring officer with app
Resource

| 13 October 2016

Ensuring people can get the contraception they want

"We capture the data directly into this app. It maps out what the demand will be and ensures that we never run out of those supplies." Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria (PPFN)'s Monitoring and Evaluation Officer, Babatunde, is responsible for ensuring the supply of contraceptives for all the cluster facilities. "My job entails the use of a mobile app built for direct data information capture (DDIC). I created an account for each of the 10 facilities that were under the Clusterplus Model. ClusterPLUS is something of a hybrid. It was built on the foundation of PPFN’s previous work but added new thinking, including ideas developed by IPPF member associations in Kenya and Uganda, who helped PPFN adapt them for Nigeria. At its heart is a simple concept - partnership. The closer you can get to local communities, the better you work with national and local government and more you try to build local ownership, the better. "Before I stock up their store, I audit their supplies and can review their monthly report via the app. I put this into the mobile app as well as the commodities I have supplied them. Every two months, the app forecasts what a particular facility will need based on the contraceptive demand,” says Babatunde. "I provided training on the mobile app for the store keepers at the facilities we worked with. All through the nine months of the Clusterplus Project, no facility ever ran out. This meant family planning methods were always available to those that needed them.” Babatunde has developed a wealth of knowledge about family planning and the many methods available. Clients favoured long-acting methods Implanol and the IUCD.

Planned Parenthood Association of Ghana
Resource

| 05 October 2016

A Bright Future: Lanterns for Women's Empowerment

Women’s empowerment is key to ensuring their health and well-being. A partnership between public, private and civil society found a unique way to address health and gender inequalities in one of the most disadvantageous communities in the Northern regions of Ghana. This pilot project introduced solar lanterns, health and economic interventions to 20 villages. The project was effective because it brought together Japan’s ODA, private sector technology and IPPF’s community-based activities to challenge structural barriers and harmful gender norms. In doing so, we have done more than bring ‘light’ where there was once ‘darkness’. This intervention has transformed the lives of women, their families and their community.

Planned Parenthood Association of Ghana
Resource

| 05 October 2016

A Bright Future: Lanterns for Women's Empowerment

Women’s empowerment is key to ensuring their health and well-being. A partnership between public, private and civil society found a unique way to address health and gender inequalities in one of the most disadvantageous communities in the Northern regions of Ghana. This pilot project introduced solar lanterns, health and economic interventions to 20 villages. The project was effective because it brought together Japan’s ODA, private sector technology and IPPF’s community-based activities to challenge structural barriers and harmful gender norms. In doing so, we have done more than bring ‘light’ where there was once ‘darkness’. This intervention has transformed the lives of women, their families and their community.

Financial Statement 2015 cover
Resource

| 17 June 2016

Financial Statement 2015

IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$126.2 million to US$116.2 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$5.8 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$6.2 million and reduced donations in kind of US$0.6 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$4m with the balance of US$0.9 million decrease in other income and trading activities. The total decrease is split between restricted and unrestricted funds by US$2.3 million and US$7.6 million respectively. With the exception of Norway and Japan, all government (more significantly Australia and Sweden) donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 14% on a like for like basis compared to 2014. Total expenditure has decreased from US$137.5 million to US$131.8 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$84.2 million to US$85.6 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$53.3 million to US$46.2 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$1.9 million) and the use of US$8.9m designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$2.3m); support for resource mobilization at regional and central level (US$1.5 million); campaign and advocacy for UN Liaison office (US$0.9 million); scale up fund for SGBV support to MAs (US$0.5 million); contingency spend on various activities (US$0.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-by-year basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted net operating expenditure of US$13.4 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$2.1 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$15.6 million. After taking into account actuarial gain on the defined benefit pension scheme and investment losses the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$13.6 million. The level of unrestricted income received was approximately US$4 million less than forecast primarily due to the strength of the US dollar versus donor currencies and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$2m million). This resulted in a decrease in general reserves to US$21.9 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$73.3 million.

Financial Statement 2015 cover
Resource

| 17 June 2016

Financial Statement 2015

IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$126.2 million to US$116.2 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$5.8 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$6.2 million and reduced donations in kind of US$0.6 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$4m with the balance of US$0.9 million decrease in other income and trading activities. The total decrease is split between restricted and unrestricted funds by US$2.3 million and US$7.6 million respectively. With the exception of Norway and Japan, all government (more significantly Australia and Sweden) donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 14% on a like for like basis compared to 2014. Total expenditure has decreased from US$137.5 million to US$131.8 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$84.2 million to US$85.6 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$53.3 million to US$46.2 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$1.9 million) and the use of US$8.9m designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$2.3m); support for resource mobilization at regional and central level (US$1.5 million); campaign and advocacy for UN Liaison office (US$0.9 million); scale up fund for SGBV support to MAs (US$0.5 million); contingency spend on various activities (US$0.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-by-year basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted net operating expenditure of US$13.4 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$2.1 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$15.6 million. After taking into account actuarial gain on the defined benefit pension scheme and investment losses the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$13.6 million. The level of unrestricted income received was approximately US$4 million less than forecast primarily due to the strength of the US dollar versus donor currencies and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$2m million). This resulted in a decrease in general reserves to US$21.9 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$73.3 million.

Financial Statement
Resource

| 17 June 2015

Financial Statement 2014

Financial Statements for 2014 Executive Summary IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$136.1 million to US$126.1 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$2.2 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$8.0 million and reduced donations in kind of US$2.2 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$2.9 million. The total decrease is equally split between unrestricted and restricted income at US$5 million each. With the exception of Australia, all government donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 9% on a like for like basis compared to 2013. Total expenditure has risen from US$132.8 million to US$137.6 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$76.8 million to US$84.3 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$56.0 million to US$53.3 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$3.6 million) and the use of designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$1.7 million); provision of support to Member Associations (MAs) to scale up services (US$0.9 million); development of the new strategic framework (US$0.4 million); international advocacy and supporting IPPF Vision 2020 campaign to place sexual reproductive health (SRH) and rights at the centre of the sustainable development agenda (US$0.8 million); and support for resource mobilization at a regional and central level (US$1.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-byyear basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted deficit of US$4.6 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$6.9 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$11.5 million. After taking into account actuarial losses on the defined benefit pension scheme the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$15.1 million. The level of unrestricted income received was as forecast in the 2014 budget and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$6.4 million). This resulted in a small increase in general reserves to US$24.0 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$85.9 million.   "The unrestricted funding that our major donors have provided to us over the long term has enabled the Federation’s Member Associations to build sustainable programmes of delivery and advocacy impacting positively the lives of millions of people."

Financial Statement
Resource

| 17 June 2015

Financial Statement 2014

Financial Statements for 2014 Executive Summary IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$136.1 million to US$126.1 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$2.2 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$8.0 million and reduced donations in kind of US$2.2 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$2.9 million. The total decrease is equally split between unrestricted and restricted income at US$5 million each. With the exception of Australia, all government donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 9% on a like for like basis compared to 2013. Total expenditure has risen from US$132.8 million to US$137.6 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$76.8 million to US$84.3 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$56.0 million to US$53.3 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$3.6 million) and the use of designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$1.7 million); provision of support to Member Associations (MAs) to scale up services (US$0.9 million); development of the new strategic framework (US$0.4 million); international advocacy and supporting IPPF Vision 2020 campaign to place sexual reproductive health (SRH) and rights at the centre of the sustainable development agenda (US$0.8 million); and support for resource mobilization at a regional and central level (US$1.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-byyear basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted deficit of US$4.6 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$6.9 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$11.5 million. After taking into account actuarial losses on the defined benefit pension scheme the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$15.1 million. The level of unrestricted income received was as forecast in the 2014 budget and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$6.4 million). This resulted in a small increase in general reserves to US$24.0 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$85.9 million.   "The unrestricted funding that our major donors have provided to us over the long term has enabled the Federation’s Member Associations to build sustainable programmes of delivery and advocacy impacting positively the lives of millions of people."

Strategic framework 2022-2028
Resource

| 06 May 2015

IPPF's Strategic Framework: 2023-2028

  For 70 years IPPF has championed and delivered quality services, comprehensive information and advocated for just laws so that more people in more places under more circumstances may realize their sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR). Started with an act of international solidarity between activists from just a handful of countries, IPPF has since grown into a broad and diverse community of services providers and advocates that stretches around the Earth. Our very existence manifests just how the demand for dignity in sexual and reproductive health and rights is universal to people the world over. But that world is changing rapidly. Tough challenges must be confronted – the toxic legacies of longstanding racism, sexism and homophobia, for example; the deepening impacts of the climate crisis, violence, and inequalities; the escalating consequences of new technologies, population displacements, and habitat destruction. Wherever such dynamics impact people’s lives, IPPF knows enjoyment of SRHR is impacted too. Whenever people confront humanitarian crises, we know their SRHR are thrust into crisis too. Whoever is subject to prejudice, bigotry, or exclusion, has their access to SRHR also eroded. We know that the worst consequences of those injustices are borne by young people in the poorest of communities, in the toughest of places, facing the fewest opportunities. To be impactful in a world of change, IPPF must change too. That is what Strategy 2028 is all about: changing IPPF so it is well equipped to uphold SRHR for those who are left out, locked out or left behind. Our Strategy 2028 sets out a familiar path but in a new direction over far tougher terrain to that clear destination. We will walk that path shoulder to shoulder with young people, and with individuals and communities bearing the full brunt of stigma and prejudice. At each step, we will defend, protect, and celebrate safety, pleasure and wellbeing in sex and reproduction. At every turn, we will denounce powers and authorities who, through policy, practice, and law, undermine dignity and human rights in those intimate realms. And, as IPPF, we will be accountable for who we are, what we do and how we do it. That is our Strategy 2028. It is with immense pride that the IPPF Board of Trustees shares this strategic itinerary with you. We very much hope you will travel this road with us – in your own realities, communities, and contexts. Let’s do that together. Let’s come together, for sexual and reproductive dignity for all - for each and every one of us, to the exclusion of none of us, in the interests of all of us. Kate Gilmore, Chair, BoT, IPPF   Download the Strategic Framework in English Download the Strategic Framework in French

Strategic framework 2022-2028
Resource

| 06 May 2015

IPPF's Strategic Framework: 2023-2028

  For 70 years IPPF has championed and delivered quality services, comprehensive information and advocated for just laws so that more people in more places under more circumstances may realize their sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR). Started with an act of international solidarity between activists from just a handful of countries, IPPF has since grown into a broad and diverse community of services providers and advocates that stretches around the Earth. Our very existence manifests just how the demand for dignity in sexual and reproductive health and rights is universal to people the world over. But that world is changing rapidly. Tough challenges must be confronted – the toxic legacies of longstanding racism, sexism and homophobia, for example; the deepening impacts of the climate crisis, violence, and inequalities; the escalating consequences of new technologies, population displacements, and habitat destruction. Wherever such dynamics impact people’s lives, IPPF knows enjoyment of SRHR is impacted too. Whenever people confront humanitarian crises, we know their SRHR are thrust into crisis too. Whoever is subject to prejudice, bigotry, or exclusion, has their access to SRHR also eroded. We know that the worst consequences of those injustices are borne by young people in the poorest of communities, in the toughest of places, facing the fewest opportunities. To be impactful in a world of change, IPPF must change too. That is what Strategy 2028 is all about: changing IPPF so it is well equipped to uphold SRHR for those who are left out, locked out or left behind. Our Strategy 2028 sets out a familiar path but in a new direction over far tougher terrain to that clear destination. We will walk that path shoulder to shoulder with young people, and with individuals and communities bearing the full brunt of stigma and prejudice. At each step, we will defend, protect, and celebrate safety, pleasure and wellbeing in sex and reproduction. At every turn, we will denounce powers and authorities who, through policy, practice, and law, undermine dignity and human rights in those intimate realms. And, as IPPF, we will be accountable for who we are, what we do and how we do it. That is our Strategy 2028. It is with immense pride that the IPPF Board of Trustees shares this strategic itinerary with you. We very much hope you will travel this road with us – in your own realities, communities, and contexts. Let’s do that together. Let’s come together, for sexual and reproductive dignity for all - for each and every one of us, to the exclusion of none of us, in the interests of all of us. Kate Gilmore, Chair, BoT, IPPF   Download the Strategic Framework in English Download the Strategic Framework in French